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Six Kinds of United States Paper Currency

Argent Dragon

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#1
Six Kinds of United States Paper Currency



On 10 July 1929 the United States replaced its large size currency, like the Series 1923 Silver Certificate One Dollar bill above (click on the image for the reverse design), with small size notes, like the corresponding Series 1928 note following:



The purpose of this change was simply to save some money on paper, but the timing inadvertently signified a new era in United States money. When the change was made there were no less than six kinds of United States paper currency, but only three months later the stock market crash ushered in the era of the Great Depression, during which three of those kinds of currency would disappear. Thirty years later, two of the remaining kinds of currency would also disappear, leaving only one.


The six kinds of currency in 1929, colored coded with the colors of their seals and serial numbers, and with the denominations they were issued in series 1928 and 1929 (though not always in those years themselves), were:



  • United States Notes (Series 1928: $1 $2 $5) Go!
  • Gold Certificates (Series 1928: $10 $20 $50 $100 $500 $1000 $5000 $10,000) Go!
  • National Bank Notes (Series 1929: $5 $10 $20 $50 $100) Go!
  • Silver Certificates (Series 1928: $1) Go!
  • Federal Reserve Bank Notes (Series 1929: $5 $10 $20 $50 $100) Go!
  • Federal Reserve Notes (Series 1928: $5 $10 $20 $50 $100 $500 $1000 $5000 $10,000) Go!

The three kinds of currency that remained after the Depression were:



  • United States Notes (Series 1953: $2 $5) Go!
  • Silver Certificates (Series 1953: $5 $10 -- Series 1957: $1) Go!
  • Federal Reserve Notes (Series 1950: $5 $10 $20 $50 $100) Go!

And all that remained by 1970 were:



  • Federal Reserve Notes (Series 1969: $1 $5 $10 $20 $50 $100 -- Series 1976: $2) Go!.

Source >> http://www.friesian.com/notes.htm
 

RUSH2112

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I do like American paper notes. They have a distinct smell and feel. They also look like real money.

Our Canadian polymer notes are bland, have no smell, slip out of everyplace you put them, won't fold and I don't feel any wealthier having them. We did have some nice notes until the Goldman Sachs trained, Bank of Canada man took charge.

Same idiot that melted down what was left most of our gold coinage rather than sell it at a profit to it's own citizens.
 

pitw

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#3
Not to mention the polymer makes such terrible pooh wipe.
 

latemetal

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I do like American paper notes. They have a distinct smell and feel. They also look like real money.

Our Canadian polymer notes are bland, have no smell, slip out of everyplace you put them, won't fold and I don't feel any wealthier having them. We did have some nice notes until the Goldman Sachs trained, Bank of Canada man took charge.

Same idiot that melted down what was left most of our gold coinage rather than sell it at a profit to it's own citizens.
If I stick this money in my wallet, what happens? Can I tuck them in G-strings...
 

Joe King

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#7
Federal Reserve Notes (Series 1950: $5 $10 $20 $50 $100) Go!
I got a 1950 series B $10 FRN in change the other day. I like those especially well as the only difference between 1950 series notes and current notes is that they removed the redeem-ability language from them. Which makes them great for "show and tell" to people.

Show both to someone and ask them, what do you think they gave in exchange for that one? Great conversation starter.

Edited to add: When I got it in change, I noticed it as soon as she opened the drawer. It's nice green colored back sitting on top of the tens in the drawer. She had it put it in there upside down.



And all that remained by 1970 were:
  • Federal Reserve Notes (Series 1969: $1 $5 $10 $20 $50 $100 -- Series 1976: $2) Go!.
Just one to go!