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Tesla in ‘Code Red Situation’ as Sell-Off Exceeds 20%

Casey Jones

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Hmm I've never even heard of a Lada. Pretty sure those didnt cost 90k though. They made a good niche sports car but that's about it. It's like a poor man's Lambo. Nothing more nothing less.
Lada was a Russian car, of course. Lada means "Beloved" in Russian. The name of the State cooperative that made those cars was known as VAZ

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lada

Their first non-military car was a cast-off Fiat model - the rear-wheel-drive 124. Fiat sold the USSR the design, rights and tooling - the whole plant, less the building, to set up in Siberia somewhere.

And that was the only car the Soviet non-Party people could buy - if they could get Party permission and raise the money.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lada_Riva

They were imported to Canada, but not the US. Although it was close - the USSR actually tried to get American EPA approval for importation; and had a list of potential dealers.

The Lada was every bit as trashy as the Yugo - another Fiat model sold to another Communist government ministry, in that case, Yugoslavia. The Yugo was based on the Fiat 127 - and interestingly, Zastava and VAZ would make parts for each other, since there was a lot of design similarity in things like steering columns, wiring harnesses and the like.

I've seen three Ladas, when in Canada (I used to be there a lot) - one was dead in a service plaza on the QEW; another was stalled on the side of the road on the Trans-Canada Highway in Alberta. A third was parked in a yard, FOR SALE, in Toronto.
 

Voodoo

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Does the name Benz ring a bell? Still around.
Car manufacturing is a very hard game to break into because of the massive work & capex of scaling production.
Tesla is the first US carmaker to disrupt 100 years of dominance by the big 3.
What did Ford do? Scale.

Nobody innovates and scales like Tesla. At full capacity, Giga Shanghai will be the highest output car factory in the world - until it's surpassed by Giga Texas. They are building 3 of the highest output car factories in the world simultaneously.

They already co-own the largest battery factory in the world (giga Nevada) and their new prototype line in Fremont will have the 13th largest cell production in the world. Then they will scale to 10x the production of Giga Nevada, which is already the largest cell factory in the world.

If you want to understand Tesla you have to understand the speed at which they are innovating and scaling.

Two nice bounces off the 50dma, but lacking in conviction. Will the wedge break up or down? View attachment 181853
Yeah all that capacity with little demand. How do you not see that ending in disaster? All he's doing is scamming local governments for whatever graft he can get to keep the thing going. Those factories will never be used to any extent.
 

gnome

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Yeah all that capacity with little demand. How do you not see that ending in disaster? All he's doing is scamming local governments for whatever graft he can get to keep the thing going. Those factories will never be used to any extent.
For 12 years every car they have made has been sold before it was made - without a single advertisement.
There is massive pent up demand for Cybertruck (a half million pre-orders and the factory isn't built yet).
There are waiting lists for new Model S Plaid, Tesla Semi, new Roadster...
The $25k economy car will be one the most awaited vehicles ever built.
 

Cigarlover

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I actually like Musk. Gotta give him credit for Space X as well. I look at those reusable rockets landing and still think that shit is fake but apparently it isn't.

I know battery day is right around the corner and I know his cars sell like hotcakes but still, a PE of 1200 seems a bit over the top. Thats like 300 years worth of earnings.
Once all the factories are online whats the production number that they can do annually? At what profit margin?
25k for a car? Thats still about 10 times what I pay for a decent used vehicle.
If the stock traded at 100 thats still a PE of 200-250 and still a bit high IMO unless someone can convince me that all these factories and battery day is gonna drop that PE down to 50 or so.
For now they seem to be miles ahead of the competition but hard to justify that stock price. Seems like a bit of irrational exuberance to me but hey, none of us expected this thing to break 1000 let alone 2500.
 

Buck

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There is massive pent up demand for Cybertruck (a half million pre-orders and the factory isn't built yet).
here's some quotes from a few years back:

$144k for the lithium required to make the battery packs

15k lbs of battery weight...idk, 44k total haul weight, minus 15k...that's a lot less produce/ widgets, each load will have to generate an equal amount in energy saved...or it's a dead loss and no company survives on a dead loss, oh, wait, there's Amazon, lol, all the others (snicker)

It will use the equivalent of 4 thousand homes worth of power to recharge



Not Going To Happen the way the batteries are being made, today, and tomorrow, and the day after, and the year after, and the 5 years after...maybe, perhaps at the 10 year point, but, there is No Truck Today, so, any technology changes from tomorrow will only lead to results that will come from tomorrow also

here's some logic, logic only:
Bank My Society On Your Dream of A Future?
You're a Foolish Man...you only want my money


and another page has turned...
 

Uglytruth

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Sorry I don't know if I read it here or somewhere else....

Article said EV "companies" will wash out and in the end be like computers. Nothing but specialty components made and assembled by a "manufacturer".

An example is GE will make electric motors, Tesla might make batteries, GM might make suspensions and chassis, Ford might make body panels, Chrysler does interiors, another wiring harnesses. It will be a lot more efficient that way....... leading to a whole new business model going forward.

Think about it there will be no more HP wars, turbo models, 4, 6, 8 cylinder models........... it will be totally different.

That could possibly lead to inner changeble battery packs. Pull into a energy station & in 5 minutes you are out with a fresh fully charged battery pack. Old one goes into the charging station ti be used the next day when charged by some green energy wet dream.

Also battery packs could be chipped so they know where they are at all times tracking your every move. Hey fatass your BMI is 37 and you have been to the dairy queen 3 times this week....... we will digitally not let you buy anything by cutting off your digits or tax you for being fat.......
 

Voodoo

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The fact that you are completely at their whim to drive anywhere is a no go for me. That was proven last week when their network was down. You cant even unlock the thing.
 

Joe King

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That was proven last week when their network was down. You cant even unlock the thing.
What? Got more info on that? Yes, imo that would be an absolute deal breaker.
 

Joe King

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Also battery packs could be chipped so they know where they are at all times tracking your every move.
Aren't the cars themselves already "chipped"?
 

Buck

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That could possibly lead to inner changeble battery packs.
watch a YT video of someone changing out their battery pack on their Prius, or whatever...it's a huge chore, it's a massive amount of absolute dead weight and 'spark' anything and you could get electrocuted or leave something exposed and you'll get corrosion and heat

these cars are built around the battery packs, not the other way around

not yet anyway so, we're at a minimum of 10 - 20 years out from that ideology even getting on-line
 

gnome

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I actually like Musk. Gotta give him credit for Space X as well. I look at those reusable rockets landing and still think that shit is fake but apparently it isn't.

I know battery day is right around the corner and I know his cars sell like hotcakes but still, a PE of 1200 seems a bit over the top. Thats like 300 years worth of earnings.
Once all the factories are online whats the production number that they can do annually? At what profit margin?
25k for a car? Thats still about 10 times what I pay for a decent used vehicle.
If the stock traded at 100 thats still a PE of 200-250 and still a bit high IMO unless someone can convince me that all these factories and battery day is gonna drop that PE down to 50 or so.
For now they seem to be miles ahead of the competition but hard to justify that stock price. Seems like a bit of irrational exuberance to me but hey, none of us expected this thing to break 1000 let alone 2500.
Battery day was Tuesday. The new battery packs are projected to cost 56% less, increase range by 54% and capex to build the battery plant will be 69% less than current battery plants. That's when they are full production. Currently they have produced over 10,000 cells.
In 2030 they are targeting 20M vehicles per year (roughly equivalent to Toyota & VW combined).

Target of 3 terawatt hours of battery production by 2030. Half for storage and half for autos. To put that number the entire battery production of the world is currently 180GWh, projected to be 2.7 terawatt hours in 2030. Eventually Tesla's energy business (solar & storage) will likely be bigger than auto business.

Tesla's Q1 margins were 25.5% per car, which are some of the best in auto industry - and those margins are growing even as they are building 3 factories simultaneously and doing massive R&D on multiple fronts.

If they actually live up to their projections, they may be looking at $1T in revenue.

 

gnome

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I actually like Musk. Gotta give him credit for Space X as well. I look at those reusable rockets landing and still think that shit is fake but apparently it isn't.

I know battery day is right around the corner and I know his cars sell like hotcakes but still, a PE of 1200 seems a bit over the top. Thats like 300 years worth of earnings.
Once all the factories are online whats the production number that they can do annually? At what profit margin?
25k for a car? Thats still about 10 times what I pay for a decent used vehicle.
If the stock traded at 100 thats still a PE of 200-250 and still a bit high IMO unless someone can convince me that all these factories and battery day is gonna drop that PE down to 50 or so.
For now they seem to be miles ahead of the competition but hard to justify that stock price. Seems like a bit of irrational exuberance to me but hey, none of us expected this thing to break 1000 let alone 2500.
Battery day was Tuesday. The new battery packs are projected to cost 56% less, increase range by 54% and capex to build the battery plant will be 69% less than current battery plants. That's when they are full production. Currently they have produced over 10,000 cells.
In 2030 they are targeting 20M vehicles per year (roughly equivalent to Toyota & VW combined).

Target of 3 terawatt hours of battery production by 2030. Half for storage and half for autos. To put that number the entire battery production of the world is currently 180GWh, projected to be 2.7 terawatt hours in 2030. Eventually Tesla's energy business (solar & storage) will likely be bigger than auto business.

Tesla's Q1 margins were 25.5% per car, which are some of the best in auto industry - and those margins are growing even as they are building 3 factories simultaneously and doing massive R&D on multiple fronts.

If they actually live up to their projections, they may be looking at $1T in revenue.

 

Zed

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We are on the verge of what may well become a depression.

So...

There is that.

Give it a decade or so.
 

Uglytruth

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these cars are built around the battery packs, not the other way around
That's because they all want to come out on "top"......... therefore universal battery packs won't exist until there are fewer players.
Think of it like a battery drill. Everyone has their own battery pack. Zero interchangeability between brands yet they are all 9.6v or 12V or 14.4v or 18v or whatever........

Now think of a flashlight with AAA, AA, C D 6V batteries...........

In my mind they are like a couple of (square) oxygen bottles on a universal mount. Running low on energy you pull into a charging station & have the ability to rapid charge (a whole different scam like ATM's with fees) to get you to your next charger island, home, work, store, restaurant, etc...... (a whole different scam like ATM's with fees) or if going on a long trip it measures how much charge you used from the last battery, gives you a credit for that energy & installs a fully loaded battery in just a few minutes like an instant oil change into a universal mounting system. Of course it is all digital billing for your energy use. (see where this is going with everything being mandatory digital for everyone) Batteries are all owned by 1 megacorp. Soon cars will be also or you will pull into the Tesla station for Tesla batteries, GM for GM batteries or maybe some other megacorp that services all makes and models......... all mega corp owned. Mega corp will consume megacorp until there is just one to work for, buy from, be controlled by........ or blackballed............... you are nothing but a grain of wheat to be harvested until you can no longer produce and are discarded as a burden to the system they created & control.

Remember it is always about control. Apple's Wazniack was complaining how everything is this monthly subscription, gated services to fleece the sheeple at every turn business model now. This would take every oucce of control away from you & give EVERYTHING to them and trackable.....
 

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Plus these aren't just battery packs. As noted above the cars are built around the batteries. They weigh 1400-1700 lbs on the Teslas. You cant just swap those in and out.
 

Uglytruth

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Plus these aren't just battery packs. As noted above the cars are built around the batteries. They weigh 1400-1700 lbs on the Teslas. You cant just swap those in and out.
Maybe not now.............. but give it time......... this is at the very very beginning....
 

Buck

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Maybe not now.............. but give it time......... this is at the very very beginning....
actually, No

Henry discarded this notion of using batteries for his cars....that was over 100 years ago...

of all the technologies we have, batteries are one of the oldest, and basically, today, besides all the exotic materials which are not available to scale, our battery technology is old-school

i've often wondered why?
100 years and the best we have is exotic materials, not more efficiency, or a permanent set-up where they 'last for ever', no, we got old school stuff because all the worlds genius' could not improve on that, those designs

and Eloy isn't any smarter than any of the rest of the genius'


idk, isn't this like doing the same thin over and over again, only getting the same results?
 

Buck

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only we're doing it with a Marketing Arm...oh boy!

You Don't Just Need One, You Need TWO!
 

gnome

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Challenging resistance at $450. ($2250 pre split). Waiting on quarterly numbers report.


Screen Shot 2020-10-01 at 10.22.11 AM.png
 

Voodoo

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RSI is very weak for making a new possible short-term high. I think the hype and the stupid easy money train is slowing down. The large town around the state just launched some Battery powered city buses. I was looking for some details but it was just noted as a partnership with Mid-American Energy (think Buffet and his subsidized wind mills) with 3/4 paid for by government grants. Double the up front costs and only goes 150 miles but the bus should be about as ideal as you can get for a battery powered vehicle. Not a good combo for the long haul trucks.

Oh and the article claimed that the DOE says the first electric car was built around here in 1890. Yep, some game changing 130 year old tech.
 
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Buck

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the first electric car was built around here in 1890.
liquid gold: it flows, can be handled easily across all venues and pound per pound, there are no more BTU's in anything else, except Nuclear, than there is in a gallon of crude oil

God's Gift to Man...and yet, here we are

(spit)
 

gnome

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RSI is very weak for making a new possible short-term high. I think the hype and the stupid easy money train is slowing down. The large town around the state just launched some Battery powered city buses. I was looking for some details but it was just noted as a partnership with Mid-American Energy (think Buffet and his subsidized wind mills) with 3/4 paid for by government grants. Double the up front costs and only goes 150 miles but the bus should be about as ideal as you can get for a battery powered vehicle. Not a good combo for the long haul trucks.

Oh and the article claimed that the DOE says the first electric car was built around here in 1890. Yep, some game changing 130 year old tech.
The action feels weak, and probably falls back once more to 50dma.
Even record deliveries for the quarter may result in a pullback if they don't hit 40% growth YOY.
Meanwhile, rest of the auto industry is looking at -10% deliveries YOY.

Electric busses are some of the lowest hanging fruit for electrification because they don't need a long range and excel at stopping and starting (regenerative braking, no wasting fuel while idling). Easy to install superchargers at depots. Massive savings on fuel and maintenance over lifetime of vehicle. As for long haul trucks, Tesla semi is advertised at 500 mile range. Prototypes are currently on the road delivering Teslas, presumably testing the new batteries. WalMart just tripled their order, though mass production is still a ways away.

Pro-industry source, but FWIW

"And while electric buses are still more expensive that fossil fueled buses, electric buses can provide cost savings over the long run. An average diesel transit bus costs around $500,000, compared with $750,000 for an electric bus, and a diesel school bus costs around $110,000 compared with $230,000 for an electric school bus, according to the report.

Over its lifetime, however, an electric bus could save $400,000 in fuel expenses and $125,000 in averted maintenance costs, according to figures from bus manufacturer New Flyer that were cited in the report. Electric buses could provide fuel and maintenance savings of up to $50,000 a year over fossil fuel powered buses, resulting in a five year payback period, according to estimates from another bus manufacturer, Proterra, cited in the report. Electric buses have significantly fewer parts than fossil fuel buses. They do not have an exhaust system, their braking systems last longer, and they do not require oil changes.

In addition, if a bus is equipped with vehicle-to-grid (V2G) capabilities, it could potentially generate up to $6,000 a year in V2G revenues, depending on a utility’s rates."

https://www.publicpower.org/periodical/article/electric-buses-mass-transit-seen-cost-effective
 

Buck

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iirc:
There were a few cities that received EV Buses for use and evaluation

i read, on line, a review of one of these cities and 5 yrs, i don't remember exactly, these buses were parked in a lot due to their inability to 'keep up' with the rest of the ICE fleet, broken down, parts unavailable, etc, no follow-through

The first few were 'money dumps', as i'll suspect gen 2 will attempt to be, and one of POTUS Trumps departments, will put an end to it...

 

Casey Jones

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I question the cost-savings; I'm not sure of the logistics of making an electric-bus fleet work; and I'm unconvinced by one of these Leftist agitation groups pushing numbers which almost-certainly are between skewed and fraudulent.

First, the time involved in charging. Now, a bus, weighing about 8-10 tons, is going to need a LOT more energy to move it. A diesel bus gets, in typical service, between four and six miles a gallon of fuel. Electric power doesn't overturn laws of physics - so there's going to have to be ten times the power potential in an electric bus as in a Tesla.

That means, ten times the charging current, as well. Can they safely charge such a large battery pack so fast/

Then, the time. Years ago I was a bus driver. Different buses for different routes, and different kinds of service - peak/rush-hour versus crosstown bus routes and Park-N-Ride and Intercity (it was a multicounty transit district). The rush-hour peak fleet would come in, nights, between 2000 and 2100 hours. The hostlers would take them; sweep them out, fuel them, check any trouble reports, and have them ready for morning rush hour about 0400. Commuter service started at about 0530 in some areas; and first the buses had to be staged at the city's edges - deadheaded out to the furthermost parts of the routes.

That's not a lot of time.

Rush hour service would stop around 9 or so; and then the peak service buses would come into the garage...be parked, not serviced, until 1500 hours. Same drill, except staging would be around the downtown stops.

So I don't see how plug-in buses can work, unless the transit agencies increases the fleet, maybe doubles it, so as to have a cushion when there's undercharged buses. Even rotating the buses, short-runs, long-runs, won't work - intercity coaches can't be used on local loop service; loop buses can't be sent to Park-N-Rides; and rush-hour peak route buses tend to be the oldest in the fleet. Newer buses are run on the visible, high-use routes on main streets.

Nope. In a few places they can be used, but as a niche service. Here, with a state university in town, the buses that run campus routes, are all electric. Gives the Snowflakes a tingle. But then, we're a city of FedGov, State and university employees. A city of desk jockeys and paper pushers; and those who serve them. That's not a normal situation.
 

Voodoo

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iirc:
There were a few cities that received EV Buses for use and evaluation

i read, on line, a review of one of these cities and 5 yrs, i don't remember exactly, these buses were parked in a lot due to their inability to 'keep up' with the rest of the ICE fleet, broken down, parts unavailable, etc, no follow-through

The first few were 'money dumps', as i'll suspect gen 2 will attempt to be, and one of POTUS Trumps departments, will put an end to it...

I read through the Proterea website, who appears to be the ones building public buses. They just released Gen 5. Of course no one is buying these things without big grant money. But those specs hardly impress. These things aren't taking over anything. The life cycle problems of lithium batteries are hard to overcome. Even with optimal electronic management. Just sitting in hot weather is hard on them.
 

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What about heating and cooling a huge glass bread box with open doors a large part of the time?
 

Casey Jones

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I read through the Proterea website, who appears to be the ones building public buses. They just released Gen 5. Of course no one is buying these things without big grant money. But those specs hardly impress. These things aren't taking over anything. The life cycle problems of lithium batteries are hard to overcome. Even with optimal electronic management. Just sitting in hot weather is hard on them.
Imagine the fireball when an Li-I bus battery pack catches fire. TEN TIMES the size of a Tesla pack.

And imagine the panic when 70 riders try to pile out of two doors. Even with a conventional bus fire, that progresses relatively slowly, panic and disorder are common enough that often riders get hurt or killed. That's allowing for two-to-five-minutes time for exit before smoke becomes overwhelming.
 

Casey Jones

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What about heating and cooling a huge glass bread box with open doors a large part of the time?
Air conditioning, I'm guessing, would have to either be left off or only used in real heat emergencies. Or...imagine this!...they'd have to have an auxiliary generator onboard to drive the HVAC system!

That would feed into Snowflake logic.
 

Voodoo

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Imagine the fireball when an Li-I bus battery pack catches fire. TEN TIMES the size of a Tesla pack.

And imagine the panic when 70 riders try to pile out of two doors. Even with a conventional bus fire, that progresses relatively slowly, panic and disorder are common enough that often riders get hurt or killed. That's allowing for two-to-five-minutes time for exit before smoke becomes overwhelming.
That's what truly scares me about these things. People have no idea the amount of energy sitting a foot below them. That company talked about school buses as well and that really would concern me letting my kids ride on an electric bus.

These packs are huge and have to be liquid cooled (gee why is that?). They seem to have done more safety designing than Tesla (because I've not seen one of these buses catch fire yet) but I don't trust them. Especially as they age.

https://www.proterra.com/proterra-powered/battery-technology/

1601656532421.png
 
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Buck

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That's what truly scares me about these things. People have no idea the amount of energy sitting a foot below them. That company talked about school buses as well and that really would concern me letting my kids ride on an electric bus.

These packs are huge and have to be liquid cooled (gee why is that?). They seem to have done more safety designing than Tesla (because I've not seen one of these buses catch fire yet) but I don't trust them. Especially as they age.

https://www.proterra.com/proterra-powered/battery-technology/

View attachment 182813
and on an ICE bus, normally a fire would be located at the rear, the engine area, or at one of the wheels, from a brake issues, etc, and that places the fire outside the 'danger zone'...that places the escape doors in the clear unless it's the RF wheel that's ablaze

but, in an EV, large sections of the floorboard can catch on fire
 

Casey Jones

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I just had a thought.

Imagine a TSLA truck...carrying gasoline or diesel fuel, or other volatile cargo. A city bus weighs about 8 tons - a loaded tractor-trailer is up to about 40 tons. Bigger, more intensive, battery packs.

Stupids do what stupids do, on the road; and Tesla-truck go crash. Batteries have a runaway...now you have lithium and diesel and plenty of up-close-and-immobile spectators.

HOW the HELL did we get here? This is complete insanity.
 

Buck

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Q:
If everything is electric, and your car fails to 'go', due to dead batteries, and you're in a parking lot at the local mall, the spot does not have a charge cord, you call AAA who shows up in their electric van and they hook their cables up to your car, where do they hook up the other end of the cables?
 

Casey Jones

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Q:
If everything is electric, and your car fails to 'go', due to dead batteries, and you're in a parking lot at the local mall, the spot does not have a charge cord, you call AAA who shows up in their electric van and they hook their cables up to your car, where do they hook up the other end of the cables?
They tow it out.

At a high-three-figure service charge.

And, if the towing company has crony connections...they'll be allowed to run DIESEL tow trucks, instead of stupid, useless electric toys. Because they need to get the job DONE.
 

MrLucky

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^^ If you have a Tesla, they may just send a car out to get you. Then send a tow truck to pickup your car & take it to be repaired. All part of their service plan.
 

Buck

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^^ If you have a Tesla, they may just send a car out to get you. Then send a tow truck to pickup your car & take it to be repaired. All part of their service plan.
they just might do that, or contract to an Uber who might be closer, then put you up in a motel for the night, etc...

but nothing is free
 

Voodoo

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I just had a thought.

Imagine a TSLA truck...carrying gasoline or diesel fuel, or other volatile cargo. A city bus weighs about 8 tons - a loaded tractor-trailer is up to about 40 tons. Bigger, more intensive, battery packs.

Stupids do what stupids do, on the road; and Tesla-truck go crash. Batteries have a runaway...now you have lithium and diesel and plenty of up-close-and-immobile spectators.

HOW the HELL did we get here? This is complete insanity.
Via a complete farce that CO2 is raising global temperatures while ignoring the output of a giant ball of fusion. These people are Insane.
 

gnome

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Beating estimates, Q3 sets a new record for deliveries and stock is down nearly 7%.
Meanwhile, the auto industry as a whole deliveries down 10% YOY.
 

Casey Jones

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they just might do that, or contract to an Uber who might be closer, then put you up in a motel for the night, etc...

but nothing is free
There's plenty of online stories of Teslas that didn't get serviced, didn't get picked up, DID get lost in the system.

But some people believe every bit of bullshit out of St. Elon's filthy mouth.
 

Buck

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There's plenty of online stories of Teslas that didn't get serviced, didn't get picked up, DID get lost in the system.

But some people believe every bit of bullshit out of St. Elon's filthy mouth.
LOL
and somehow i'm thinking that every one of them 'paid for it'
 

gnome

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Not just cars. Don't sleep on the energy storage division. Musk says it may end up larger than vehicles - and his target for vehicles in 2030 is 20M cars per year.

New Tesla 4680 cells will presumably go into vehicles first, but once production is ramped to terawatts they will go into commercial and residential storage - at dramatically less cost than current pricing, which is already industry lowest.

Tesla is running away with the energy storage market.

https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-powerwall-2-dominates-us-energy-storage-market/
Tesla Powerwall 2 is completely dominating the US home energy storage market: report
Simon Alvarez
BySimon AlvarezPosted on October 9, 2020

A recently-published report from EnergySage, an online comparison-shopping marketplace for rooftop solar and energy storage systems, has revealed something quite incredible. Despite Tesla Energy’s understated ramp, the Powerwall 2 has actually been dominating the United States’ residential battery storage market — and the competition is not even close.

Tesla Energy’s domination is due in no small part to the Powerwall 2’s pricing, which makes it the least expensive storage option on a per-kWh stored basis.

The findings about Tesla’s humble residential battery unit were shared by EnergySage in its eleventh semiannual Solar Marketplace Intel Report, which covers the 12-month period from July 2019 to June 2020. This time around, the company decided to look into transaction-level battery storage data from its Solar Marketplace. These included information about energy storage solutions that are usually being quoted to homeowners.

Screen Shot 2020-10-10 at 9.10.33 AM.png


Based on EnergySage’s report, over half of the battery storage quotes in the platform included a Tesla Powerwall. This made Tesla’s humble residential battery unit the most-quoted battery storage option in the platform by a wide margin.

As noted in a report from PV Magazine USA, part of the reason behind the Powerwall 2’s domination of the energy storage segment is Tesla’s aggressive pricing, which undercuts competitors to a significant degree. On a cost per kWh stored basis, Tesla offers the cheapest battery storage option in EnergySage’s Marketplace, with its strongest competitor, LG Chem, offering alternatives that are over 30% more expensive. Other competitors are far more disadvantaged against the Powerwall 2 on a cost per kWh basis.

“To date, the two most widely quoted storage brands on the EnergySage Marketplace are Tesla and LG Chem, in line with installation data from California’s Self Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) over the last few years. Presently, over half of all quotes on EnergySage are for the Tesla Powerwall 2. Looking at installed costs, Tesla is also the lowest cost offering on a dollar per kilowatt-hour ($/kWh) basis. Interestingly, two companies who use lithium iron phosphate (LFP) battery chemistries–Enphase and sonnen–see the highest $/kWh costs in the Marketplace,” the report noted.

The Powerwall 2 may be Tesla’s most humble battery storage unit, but it holds a lot of potential. Boasting an integrated DC/AC converter, off-grid capabilities, and mobile app support, the Powerwall 2 has all the elements of a classic Tesla product. The battery unit, just like the company’s electric cars, receives over-the-air updates, optimizing its performance and adding new features. Among these is Storm Watch, which maximizes energy storage during inclement weather and other conditions that may threaten the power grid.

EnergySage’s full Solar Marketplace Intel Report could be accessed below.