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The Art of making Colloidal Silver / Silver Ions / Electrically Isolated Silver

abeland1

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This is a bigger deal than Ebola ever was. It is already here, and it's growing — mushrooms for mushrooms.
A deadly, drug-resistant fungus is infecting patients in hospitals and nursing homes around the world. The germ, a fungus called _Candida auris_, preys on people with weakened immune systems, and it is quietly spreading across the globe. Over the last 5 years, it has hit a neonatal unit in Venezuela, swept through a hospital in Spain, forced a prestigious British medical center to shut down its intensive care unit, and taken root in India, Pakistan and South Africa. Recently _C. auris_ reached New York, New Jersey and Illinois, leading the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to add it to a list of germs deemed "urgent threats." _C. auris_ is so tenacious, in part, because it is impervious to major antifungal medications, making it a new example of one of the world's most intractable health threats: the rise of drug-resistant infections.
For decades, public health experts have warned that the overuse of antibiotics was reducing the effectiveness of drugs that have lengthened life spans by curing bacterial infections once commonly fatal. But lately, there has been an explosion of resistant fungi as well, adding a new and frightening dimension to a phenomenon that is undermining a pillar of modern medicine. "It's an enormous problem," said Matthew Fisher, a professor of fungal epidemiology at Imperial College London, who was a co-author of a recent scientific review on the rise of resistant fungi. "We depend on being able to treat those patients with antifungals." Simply put, fungi, just like bacteria, are evolving defenses to survive modern medicines. Yet even as world health leaders have pleaded for more restraint in prescribing antimicrobial drugs to combat bacteria and fungi -- convening the United Nations General Assembly in 2016 to manage an emerging crisis -- gluttonous overuse of them in hospitals, clinics and farming has continued.
Resistant germs are often called "superbugs," but this is simplistic because they don't typically kill everyone. Instead, they are most lethal to people with immature or compromised immune systems, including newborns and the elderly, smokers, diabetics and people with autoimmune disorders who take steroids that suppress the body's defenses. Scientists say that unless more effective new medicines are developed and unnecessary use of antimicrobial drugs is sharply curbed, risk will spread to healthier populations. A study that the British government funded projects that if policies are not put in place to slow the rise of drug resistance, 10 million people could die worldwide of all such infections in 2050, eclipsing the 8 million expected to die that year from cancer. But In the United States, 2 million people contract resistant infections annually, and 23 000 die from them, according to the official CDC estimate. That number was based on 2010 figures; more recent estimates from researchers at Washington University School of Medicine put the death toll at 162 000. Worldwide fatalities from resistant infections are estimated at 700 000.
Antibiotics and antifungals are both essential to combat infections in people, but antibiotics are also used widely to prevent disease in farm animals, and antifungals are also applied to prevent agricultural plants from rotting. Some scientists cite evidence that rampant use of fungicides on crops is contributing to the surge in drug-resistant fungi infecting humans.
Yet as the problem grows, it is little understood by the public, in part because the very existence of resistant infections is often cloaked in secrecy. With bacteria and fungi alike, hospitals and local governments are reluctant to disclose outbreaks for fear of being seen as infection hubs. Even the CDC, under its agreement with states, is allowed tomake public the location or name of hospitals involved in outbreaks. State governments have in many cases declined to publicly share information beyond acknowledging that they have had cases. All the while, the germs are easily spread, carried on hands and equipment inside hospitals; ferried on meat and manure-fertilized vegetables from farms; transported across borders by travelers and onexports and imports; and transferred by patients from nursing home to hospital and back. Other prominent strains of the fungus _Candida_ -- one of the most common causes of bloodstream infections in hospitals -- have not developed significant resistance to drugs, but more than 90 percent of _C. auris_ infections are resistant to at least one drug, and 30 percent are resistant to 2 or more drugs, the CDC said. Dr. Lynn Sosa, Connecticut's deputy state epidemiologist, said she now saw _C. auris_ as "the top" threat among resistant infections. "It's pretty much unbeatable and difficult to identity," she said. Nearly half of patients who contract _C. auris_ die within 90 days,according to the CDC. Yet the world's experts have not nailed down where it came from in the 1st place. "It is a creature from the black lagoon," said Dr. Tom Chiller, who heads the fungal branch at the CDC, which is spearheading a global detective effort to find treatments and stop the spread. "It bubbled up, and now it is everywhere."
On 24 Jun 2016, the CDC blasted a nationwide warning to hospitals and medical groups and set up an email address, <candidaauris@cdc.gov>, to field queries. Dr. Snigdha Vallabhaneni, a key member of the fungal team, expected to get a trickle, "maybe a message every month." Instead, within weeks, her inbox exploded. In the United States, 587cases of people having contracted _C. auris_ have been reported, concentrated with 309 in New York, 104 in New Jersey and 144 in Illinois, according to the CDC. Most cases in the United States have been in nursing homes in New York City, Chicago and New Jersey.
As the CDC works to limit the spread of drug-resistant _C. auris_, its investigators have been trying to answer the vexing question: Where in good the world did it come from? The 1st time doctors encountered _C. auris_ was in the ear of a woman in Japan in 2009 (auris is Latin for ear). It seemed innocuous at the time, a cousin of common, easily treated fungal infections. Three years later, it appeared in an unusual test result in the lab of Dr. Jacques Meis, a microbiologist in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, who was analyzing a bloodstream infection in 18 patients from 2 hospitals in India. Soon, new clusters of _C. auris_ seemed to emerge with each passing month in different parts of the world. The CDC investigators theorized that _C. auris_ started in Asia and spread across the globe.
But when the agency compared the entire genome of _auris_ samples from India and Pakistan, Venezuela, South Africa and Japan, it found that its origin was not a single place, and there was not a single _auris_ strain. The genome sequencing showed that there were 4 distinctive versions of the fungus, with differences so profound that they space suggested that these strains had diverged thousands of years ago and emerged as resistant pathogens from harmless environmental strains in 4 different places at the same time. "Somehow, it made a jump almost seemingly simultaneously, and seemed to spread, and it is drug resistant, which is really mind-boggling," Dr. Vallabhaneni said.
There are different theories as to what happened with _C. auris_. Dr. Meis, the Dutch researcher, said he believed that drug-resistant fungi were developing thanks to heavy use of fungicides on crops. Dr. Meis became intrigued by resistant fungi when he heard about the case of a 63-year-old patient in the Netherlands who died in 2005 from a fungus called _Aspergillus_. It proved resistant to a front-line antifungal treatment called itraconazole. That drug is a virtual copy of the azole pesticides that are used to dust crops the world over and account for more than 1/3rd of all fungicide sales.A 2013 paper in Plos Pathogens said that it appeared to be no coincidence that drug-resistant _Aspergillus_ was showing up in the environment where the azole fungicides were used [1]. The fungus appeared in 12 percent of Dutch soil samples, for example, but also in "flower beds, compost, leaves, plant seeds, soil samples of tea gardens, paddy fields, hospital surroundings, and aerial samples of hospitals." Dr. Meis visited the CDC last summer [2018] to share research and theorize that the same thing is happening with _C. auris_, which is also found in the soil: Azoles have created an environment so hostile that the fungi are evolving, with resistant strains surviving. This is similar to concerns that resistant bacteria are growing because of excessive use of antibiotics in livestock for health andgrowth promotion. As with antibiotics in farm animals, azoles are used widely on crops. "On everything, potatoes, beans, wheat, anything you can think of, tomatoes, onions," said Dr. Rhodes, the infectious disease specialist who worked on the London outbreak. "We are driving this with the use of antifungicides on crops." Dr. Chiller theorizes that _C. auris_ may have benefited from the heavy use of fungicides. His idea is that _C. auris_ actually has existed for thousands of years, hidden in the world's crevices, a not particularly aggressive bug. But as azoles began destroying more prevalent fungi, an opportunity arrived for _C. auris_ to enter the breach, a germ that had the ability to readily resist fungicides now suitable for a world in which fungi less able to resist are under attack. The mystery of _C. auris_'s emergence remains unsolved, and its origin seems, for the moment, to be less important than stopping its spread.
For now, the uncertainty around _C. auris_ has led to a climate of fear, and sometimes denial.
[Byline: Matt Richtel, Andrew Jacobs]
<https://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1003633>.]
 

the_shootist

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Hey guys, I've been reviewing this thread and am now suffering from information overload and need some guidance. I am convinced that you guys are onto something very important here and would like to build my own system for making colloidal silver. I purchased a 32oz bottle of sovereign silver just to have some on hand (and it's pricey). I want to make my own but want to do it right based on all the information I WAS able to absorb, like being sure what I'm making is not just silver soup and will have the properties which maximize effectiveness (small particle size, proper PPM, etc).

Can one of you experts (I use that term with the utmost respect) guide me through the maze of Youtube videos and endless homemade webpages to the information I should know for what equipment I should get to make colloidal silver and properly test it?

Please feel free to message me also!

Thanks in advance guys!!!
 

Weatherman

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Just buy the Atlasnova Ultra. I did - TWICE! Best quality EIS available, and so simple to use that videos would be boring to watch.
 

the_shootist

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GOLDBRIX

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How is this one any different other than the smaller bottle? I'm trying to justify the cost

https://www.atlasnova.com/product/one-and-half-pint-colloidal-silver-generator-ultra-csg-ultra-1hp/
t_s, You do not even have to go w/ the smaller Ultra version.
I bought the AtlasNova CSG-1 and used that before I even knew Arnold was a board member here. I used it for years and could still be using it but I decided to move move up to the Half Gallon Ultra unit.
The CSG-1 is ideal for those new to Colloidal Silver (most of us now call it Electrically Isolated Silver - EIS).
With the CSG-1 all you need to supply is a drinking glass,or a Ball/canning jar - Jelly size, and distilled water.
A TDS or EIC meter is helpful but not necessary. For my first year and a half I went by judging color to get a Wild-Ass- Guess of how much ppms the unit had generated over the time period. The color YELLOW was good identification of 10-15 ppms and the process would be done in 8-10 hours from the start.
For $50.00 or $60.00 you get a rig that will make GALLONS (at a jar at a time) for pennies.
IDK what size Sov. Sil. you bought but you are still paying DOLLARS per OUNCE instead of Pennies per Gallon.

As a novice just starting I'd do what I did START with one of the CSG-1 versions.
OBTW AtlasNova did not even have a plug in version when I started. I learned to jerry-rig an old cellphone charger I had laying around. A year or two later Arnold came up with the plug-in version.

NOTE: I am in no way connected, compensated, or receive money for my opinion of AtlasNova products.
DYODD.
 

the_shootist

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IDK what size Sov. Sil. you bought but you are still paying DOLLARS per OUNCE instead of Pennies per Gallon.
Trust me, I got that message. I got the 32oz size bottle and yeah, it was almost $70 so I'm going to make my own. I just wanted to reach out to you gentlemen for guidance. The last thing I want to do is happily make gallons of electrified water that doesn't do anything :)
 

abeland1

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Last edited:

abeland1

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This is very helpful, thank you. Is this your company and are these your products sir?
I only design and hang out here. My significant other, Alvine, tests the products, writes the instructions, is the webmaster and packs and ships.
 

GOLDBRIX

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So Arnold is the tinkerer and Alvine turns tinkering into business. ;)
:gold: :troll:
 

the_shootist

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I only design and hang out here. My significant other, Alvine, tests the products, writes the instructions, is the webmaster and packs and ships.
Well, thank you for being here! Well done BTW, great looking product! Still assessing but I believe we'll be doing business in the near future!
 

the_shootist

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I've placed my order. Looks like I'll be making my our brew now! :2 thumbs up:
Received my CSG kit yesterday and i'm thrilled! Everything I need to make Colloidal Silver. Well packaged, well constructed with plenty of great documentation. Good honest value for your money!

I highly recommend Atlasnova's product offerings if you're thinking about making your own Colloidal Silver!! :2 thumbs up:
 

abeland1

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southfork

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Received my CSG kit yesterday and i'm thrilled! Everything I need to make Colloidal Silver. Well packaged, well constructed with plenty of great documentation. Good honest value for your money!

I highly recommend Atlasnova's product offerings if you're thinking about making your own Colloidal Silver!! :2 thumbs up:
Have you used the unit yet??