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The Holy Grail Of Electric Vehicle Charging

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#1
The Holy Grail Of Electric Vehicle Charging
Alex Kimani




For all their hype and techno-wizardry, EVs still bow down to their gas-powered cousins when it comes to driving range, not to mention that they take much longer to refuel. But what if you could not only charge your EV wirelessly but also be able to do it on the fly? Suddenly, the EV glass ceiling would be forever shattered, leaving piston heads green with envy. That’s why a new technology that allows EV drivers to recharge their batteries on the go is bound to thrill EV buffs everywhere.


Stanford University researchers have unveiled a wireless charging technology that employs magnetism to seamlessly charge EVs, drones, and robots during operation.


But read on before you rush to ditch your gas-guzzler for a brand new Tesla Model 3.


Charging on the go


The scientists made their first breakthrough three years ago when they developed a wireless charger capable of transmitting electricity even as the distance to the receiver keeps changing. They were able to pull this off by using an amplifier and a feedback resistor that allowed the charging system to continuously adjust its operating frequency on the go.


That was a breakthrough given that wireless charging is highly sensitive to the relative movement of the device with respect to the power source during charging. Previous attempts to overcome this limitation employed nonlinear parity-time symmetric circuits to deliver robust wireless power. However, these systems experience huge power losses making them too inefficient for practical uses.


Unfortunately, Stanford’s first iteration also suffered from a similar handicap--it consumed too much power to generate the required amplification.


Their latest work, however, achieves much higher efficiencies by using a power-efficient switch-mode amplifier system that incorporates current-sensing feedback in a parity–time-symmetric circuit.


This arrangement maintains a constant effective load impedance across the switch-mode amplifier, thus allowing the amplifier to maintain high efficiency of up to 92% during charging.


Scaling the New Technology


Despite the impressive charging efficiency, Stanford’s prototype has only been demonstrated over a distance of 2-3 feet for the transmission of just 10 watts. This is nowhere near enough to charge your average EV, with Tesla superchargers typically spouting out ~250kW.


But don’t feel discouraged.


Shanhui Fan and Sid Assawaworrarit, the Stanford engineers who built the system, have said there “aren’t any fundamental obstacles” that would prevent their technology from scaling to transmit tens or even hundreds of kilowatts necessary to charge an EV.


Further, they have said they are “already within the range of practical usefulness” needed for recharging gadgets like robots during operation.


Game Changer for EV Industry


Over the past decade, EVs have made the remarkable leap from a curious fad widely viewed as a rich man’s toy to a mainstream technology that’s giving piston heads some serious food for thought. A big part of this success can be chalked up to great advances in battery technology that has made EVs more affordable and brought them closer to achieving cost parity with ICEs.


Still, many people considering the switch to EVs cite range limitations as their biggest concern.


Wireless charging--the most prevalent subset of wireless power transmission--is now a popular consumer technology commonly used by smartphone makers, including Apple, Samsung, LG, Nokia, and Google, among others. Indeed, wireless charging is now used in healthcare, manufacturing, and automotive industries and even the burgeoning Internet of Things (IoT) industry.


However, all these technologies employ charging pads that only work when the devices are stationary. Charging an EV wirelessly is a cool trick you can use to impress your buddies but does not improve the value proposition of owning an EV a whole lot.


That makes the tech by Stanford engineers a major leap forward because it gives us hope that one day drivers will be able to recharge their vehicles without having to stop for 30-60 minutes.


We don’t know yet whether the Stanford charging technology will be able to work over the entire 63-75 mile radius that’s typical between Tesla superchargers. But even increasing the typical driving range by 20-30% might prove enough to be a game changer for the EV industry.


By Alex Kimani for Oilprice.com




Alex Kimani is a veteran finance writer, investor, engineer and researcher for Safehaven.com.



http://www.silverbearcafe.com/private/05.20/grail.html




oilprice.com​
 

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#3
Back in the early days of vehicles one had to spin a hand crank that produced the charge to start the engine. I forgot what the contraption was called ( Dynamo ? IDK) . My great Jr. High Science teacher had one, just about the size of your hand.
While teaching us about electricity he'd bet a candy bar that nobody could hold the two attached wires for just one spin of the crank. He never lost the candy bar.
Anyway I always wondered why a set of those "dynamos(?)" could not be placed on a vehicle one on each wheel, and keep a charge constantly going to an electric motor to run the car ?

If anybody recalls what the spark generator's is really called please feel free to provide it in a reply.
 

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#4
Back in the early days of vehicles one had to spin a hand crank that produced the charge to start the engine. I forgot what the contraption was called ( Dynamo ? IDK) . My great Jr. High Science teacher had one, just about the size of your hand.
While teaching us about electricity he'd bet a candy bar that nobody could hold the two attached wires for just one spin of the crank. He never lost the candy bar.
Anyway I always wondered why a set of those "dynamos(?)" could not be placed on a vehicle one on each wheel, and keep a charge constantly going to an electric motor to run the car ?

If anybody recalls what the spark generator's is really called please feel free to provide it in a reply.
"Dynamo" is an older term for "generator".

Cars no longer use generators (inefficient, stone age) -- they now have alternators.

My Daddy had to hand-crank our car to start it when I wuz a kid. During the War, it was simply not possible to get a new battery for your car. Ours was under a wooden floor-board trap door on the passenger side and had 3 cells (6V).

Since the battery was zippo, the crank was necessary. He showed me how you pulled it; you started with the handle at the 6 o'clock position, and yanked quickly upward to 12, letting go at the very top. If you did NOT let go, and the engine kicked back (often did, timing sucked in those days) you could get a busted hand when the crank came back.

LATE EDIT ADD -- I fergot to address your second question. Putting a generator (of any ilk) on each wheel would make a pretty good braking system. When a generator has a load put on it, the generator becomes harder to turn. <-- If it didn't, you'd have a perpetual motion/perpetual energy source.***

***You could plug a generator onto a wheel, and turn the wheel... which would turn the generator... which would turn the wheel. <-- We are working on this. ;-)
 
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D-FENZ

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I fergot to address your second question. Putting a generator (of any ilk) on each wheel would make a pretty good braking system. When a generator has a load put on it, the generator becomes harder to turn. <-- If it didn't, you'd have a perpetual motion/perpetual energy source.***
They already use this regenerative braking technology on some hybrids and electric vehicles. At present it adds a lot to the cost of the vehicle and you still need friction brakes too. But given time and tech advances it will become more efficient and common.
 

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"Dynamo" is an older term for "generator".

Cars no longer use generators (inefficient, stone age) -- they now have alternators.

My Daddy had to hand-crank our car to start it when I wuz a kid. During the War, it was simply not possible to get a new battery for your car. Ours was under a wooden floor-board trap door on the passenger side and had 3 cells (6V).

Since the battery was zippo, the crank was necessary. He showed me how you pulled it; you started with the handle at the 6 o'clock position, and yanked quickly upward to 12, letting go at the very top. If you did NOT let go, and the engine kicked back (often did, timing sucked in those days) you could get a busted hand when the crank came back.

LATE EDIT ADD -- I fergot to address your second question. Putting a generator (of any ilk) on each wheel would make a pretty good braking system. When a generator has a load put on it, the generator becomes harder to turn. <-- If it didn't, you'd have a perpetual motion/perpetual energy source.***

***You could plug a generator onto a wheel, and turn the wheel... which would turn the generator... which would turn the wheel. <-- We are working on this. ;-)
So as a kid when we would push start a car up to 35mph, was that tripping a generator or were they already alternators in the '60 ?
 

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TAEZZAR

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That sounds familiar. THANKS TAEZ.
The only reason I knew is because we had a magneto failure in our friend's Cessna 170. We were down in Baja, at 8K feet when we lost a couple hundred RPM We were close to Loreto, our destination, when it happened.
Airplanes have 2 magnetos, as a redundant safety factor. In order to get the new one timed properly, we had to "prop" the engine while holding the wires to determine the point of creating the spark. it took several shocking try's to get it right. BTW, he would have gotten the candy bar.
magneto failure.png
 

Unca Walt

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#12
A magneto is that thingy that supplies the voltage for the spark plugs. Very little current, so you can't charge a battery with one.

A generator has to have a high push-and-rotation speed (and by nature they are big, heavy, clumsy mothas) while an alternator does not require nearly as much speed to efficiently charge the battery.

So as a kid when we would push start a car up to 35mph, was that tripping a generator or were they already alternators in the '60 ?
Thass 'xackly what you were doing. Except that 35MPH number is if you are push-starting an automagic transmission car. You gotta get going that fast before your spark-juicer gets the message. With a standard shift, get your bud to push the car even at a slow walk.

Pop the clutch, which sends a jolt through your sparkety plugs, and you have a running motor.

Regarding the 35MPH thing: A guy asked a lady to give him a push to 35MPH. She backed up, and drove into the ass of his car at that speed. :bang head::beer::blond:
 

TAEZZAR

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With a standard shift, get your bud to push the car even at a slow walk.
YUP ! Back in the 60's. I had an old VW that we put in 2nd gear & pushed to about 2 MPH, popped the clutch & off we went ! :2 thumbs up::drive by:
 

Unca Walt

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They already use this regenerative braking technology on some hybrids and electric vehicles. At present it adds a lot to the cost of the vehicle and you still need friction brakes too. But given time and tech advances it will become more efficient and common.
YOWZA.

Another energy-storer idea is the use of a momentum-spinning disk (AKA: Flywheel).

Ain't no breakthroughs anywhere, though. The spinning-disk concept was already in use in way back in WWII to get fighter planes started without electricity; two guys would get a big crank turning a flywheel, and the pilot would hit the starter, transferring the energy from the flywheel to turning over his engine.
 

Buck

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YUP ! Back in the 60's. I had an old VW that we put in 2nd gear & pushed to about 2 MPH, popped the clutch & off we went ! :2 thumbs up::drive by:
the good old days...what happens when you push start a Tesla, off a cliff???
 
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#17
Back in the early days of vehicles one had to spin a hand crank that produced the charge to start the engine. I forgot what the contraption was called ( Dynamo ? IDK) . My great Jr. High Science teacher had one, just about the size of your hand.
While teaching us about electricity he'd bet a candy bar that nobody could hold the two attached wires for just one spin of the crank. He never lost the candy bar.
Anyway I always wondered why a set of those "dynamos(?)" could not be placed on a vehicle one on each wheel, and keep a charge constantly going to an electric motor to run the car ?

If anybody recalls what the spark generator's is really called please feel free to provide it in a reply.
"Magneto"
 

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#19
So as a kid when we would push start a car up to 35mph, was that tripping a generator or were they already alternators in the '60 ?
Chrysler came out with the alternator about 1960. Took a little time to work into all their cars.

GM and Ford adopted them in the mid-1960s. Imported cars were slower - IIRC, even the early Toyotas had it, in the 1960s, but my first car was a VW Super Beetle, a 1972. With a generator.

Generator, and air-cooling...getting stopped in traffic on the Memorial Shoreway on a hot summer night, entailed a whole lot of risks.

And, voltage-regulation: That battery boiled over regularly. Bad enough, but it was stored under the back seat. Most older Beetles had the floor-pan rusted out where the battery would sit.

HOWEVER. You cannot push-start an alternator-vehicle if it's completely dead. It needs some juice from the battery to energize its field. You have to get a generator-car going faster to get spark, but you can push-start even if the battery's deader than Elvis.
 

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#20
A magneto is that thingy that supplies the voltage for the spark plugs. Very little current, so you can't charge a battery with one.
Wouldn't that be called a coil? Model T's had one per cylinder if I recall... they'd make a 'clacking' sound...

Pop the clutch, which sends a jolt through your sparkety plugs, and you have a running motor.
Yes, I did this as well... Putting it in 3rd gear on a VW seemed to make it much easier.

Same thing with slick intersections in winter. Drop into 3rd and step on the gas and it chooches right along...


If they could capture static from the air flow around the body and store that... hmmm
 

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Wouldn't that be called a coil? Model T's had one per cylinder if I recall... they'd make a 'clacking' sound...
A "coil" was just that. An electrical coil.

Charged with six or twelve volts...whatever the voltage design was on that model.

Cut the power to the coil, and a secondary voltage flash on the ferrous core, would send a low-amp, very-high-voltage impulse out the spark lead. THAT is power to the spark plug.

The mid-century cars would have one coil, with a distributor (rotating circuit completer) that would direct the spark to the appropriate plug at the appropriate time. On a six-cylinder engine, you'd have three coil-power collapses and sparks every revolution. Imagine the engine at 3000 rpm...that's a lot of action for the coil.

I don't know about Model Ts. Never took one apart or examined one; but on modern cars, you have a coil for each plug, set on top of the plug, and the field collapse is controlled with a computer. Much better, when it works. Impossible to fix, when it doesn't.

Modern mechanics is just black-box replacement. Keep changing out the black logic modules until you find the one that's being difficult.
 

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Generator, and air-cooling...getting stopped in traffic on the Memorial Shoreway on a hot summer night, entailed a whole lot of risks.
They floated back then so just drive into a waterway and go. They use to have VW "Water"-BUG races on the Ohio when I was a kid.
 

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They floated back then so just drive into a waterway and go. They use to have VW Water-BUG races on the Ohio when I was a kid.
Yeah. There's a funny story to go with that.

Our local VW dealer, believed that hype, too. So, as a Memorial Day stunt (about 1970) he set up a pool in front of the dealership (oddly there was grass there; the paved lot was behind the showroom) and he dropped a new Beetle in the filled pool.

Over the weekend...in hours, in fact, the Beetle filled with water and sank, with one front wheel over the edge of the above-ground pool. The sidewalls were four-feet high. Looked like a drowning victim...the dealer had salvage people in on a Sunday afternoon to take it all down...

It would have been interesting to be a fly on the wall, as he explained this loss to his insurance agent and floorplan bank representative.
 

GOLDBRIX

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Yeah. There's a funny story to go with that.

Our local VW dealer, believed that hype, too. So, as a Memorial Day stunt (about 1970) he set up a pool in front of the dealership (oddly there was grass there; the paved lot was behind the showroom) and he dropped a new Beetle in the filled pool.

Over the weekend...in hours, in fact, the Beetle filled with water and sank, with one front wheel over the edge of the above-ground pool. The sidewalls were four-feet high. Looked like a drowning victim...the dealer had salvage people in on a Sunday afternoon to take it all down...

It would have been interesting to be a fly on the wall, as he explained this loss to his insurance agent and floorplan bank representative.
I just saw VW Bugs in the Ohio River racing. IDK if they had been modified or not for these special events.
I do know the hood made a great toboggan in the winter time. Dayton, Ohio is surrounded by what use to be some of the biggest Earthen Dams of the time due to the 1913 Flood photo of downtown Dayton:
1590169395285.png

Englewood and Taylorsville Dams were the biggest and longest. Taylorsville dam would back up and slow the released of water from the Great Miami River. Englewood Dam did the same on the Stillwater river. About 15 miles separated East and West. The Stillwater joined the Great Miami and the Mad Rivers in downtown Dayton.
If ya like OHIO history, floods or both : https://www.daytondailynews.com/new...-boats-and-lost-lives/6MzhsTtAysABc4pFACBjpL/

O.k back to story time: The town I grew up in sat right between these two big dams on The National Road . As Jr. and High schoolers in the Winter time we'd go to the dams ( built in tiers like the Step Pyramid) and slide down the face of the dams. Some would have toboggans some on sleds, and others just made do with whatever.
One of the upper classmen had a bug and they'd unscrew the hood, turn it upside down and two people would go flying down. Every tier / stepp hit would sail the hood 30 feet before touching snow again.
Those of us with sleds & 'boggans would want to trade rides and some would get to "fly".
The county sheriff deputies and township police would come by and make us leave but did not stay to supervise the exit, we would get a few more runs in and head out.
Sometimes we'd just ping-pong going from one dam to the other. But most of the time there were kids at both so the LEOs could screw up out "playtime".
One more thing you can do with a VW bug or piece of one.
 

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dacrunch

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Crank starts are just like kick starts for motorcycles (or rolling jump-starts on manual transmission)... i.e. enough to roll the pistons over & spin the engine to create enough juice to light up the spark plugs...
 

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Crank starts are just like kick starts for motorcycles (or rolling jump-starts on manual transmission)... i.e. enough to roll the pistons over & spin the engine to create enough juice to light up the spark plugs...
Not quite. In fact, kickstarts aren't all alike. With, say, a three-cylinder two-stroke, you just slam that kick lever down, and off you go.

With a big single-cylinder four stroke, you have to use the compression release to get it just PAST compression, and then slam it home and hope the flywheel carries it around through the next compression. Sometimes it does; sometimes it doesn't fire; and once in a while it will compress, light off, and spin back down - the wrong way. Just like with a Model T.

And if your kickstarter is still down, haven't lifted your foot off it, yet, it can launch you off the seat. Since you're on two wheels and your other leg is the balance point...it can be humorous and injurious and property damaging, as you drop your new SR 500 onto the concrete.
 

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Not quite. In fact, kickstarts aren't all alike. With, say, a three-cylinder two-stroke, you just slam that kick lever down, and off you go.

With a big single-cylinder four stroke, you have to use the compression release to get it just PAST compression, and then slam it home and hope the flywheel carries it around through the next compression. Sometimes it does; sometimes it doesn't fire; and once in a while it will compress, light off, and spin back down - the wrong way. Just like with a Model T.

And if your kickstarter is still down, haven't lifted your foot off it, yet, it can launch you off the seat. Since you're on two wheels and your other leg is the balance point...it can be humorous and injurious and property damaging, as you drop your new SR 500 onto the concrete.
You're talking to a guy who had a Yamaha XT 500 single cylinder 4-stroke without electric start... I know how to get my foot out of the way of the "kick-back", haha... (and never try to start it without wearing heavy boots...)
PS - Was quite a relief when I later bought the electric-start XT 600...
PPs - I liked the ride of the 500 more (easy wheelies & beat all other bikes from stoplight to stoplight)... but both are a pain (gearing) on the highway... and too (top) heavy for comfortable off-roading... always thought about changing the front & rear sprockets...
 
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Unca Walt

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You're talking to a guy who had a Yamaha XT 500 single cylinder 4-stroke without electric start... I know how to get my foot out of the way of the "kick-back", haha... (and never try to start it without wearing heavy boots...)
PS - Was quite a relief when I later bought the electric-start XT 600...
PPs - I liked the ride of the 500 more (easy wheelies & beat all other bikes from stoplight to stoplight)... but both are a pain (gearing) on the highway... and too (top) heavy for comfortable off-roading... always thought about changing the front & rear sprockets...
I hear ya.

But I took my Cadillac off-road one time. TINS. That is the equivalent of your Yamaha XT's going there. Putting a 51-tooth sprocket on one would make it a poor hybrid -- neither fish nor fowl.

(*Snork*) Now that I think of it, I took my monster Yamaha off-road ONCE (cruise control!! radio, windshield, forward foot rests, garbage can, back bucket seat, yada). Got in a bit of sand that I would not have even noticed with my trail bike Suzy... and damn' near hadda get a fargin tow truck! !
 
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Uncle

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#32
You're talking to a guy who had a Yamaha XT 500 single cylinder 4-stroke without electric start... I know how to get my foot out of the way of the "kick-back", haha... (and never try to start it without wearing heavy boots...)
PS - Was quite a relief when I later bought the electric-start XT 600...
PPs - I liked the ride of the 500 more (easy wheelies & beat all other bikes from stoplight to stoplight)... but both are a pain (gearing) on the highway... and too (top) heavy for comfortable off-roading... always thought about changing the front & rear sprockets...
Locally the XT 500, 550 and TT 500 had decompression.

Could still punch through Hang Ten flip-flops though.

The Tenere 600 was my goto general. The TT had 51 at the back and careful or balls-to-the-wall did it.

Golden Regards
Uncle
 

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#34
“Dynamic braking” has been used in mining and railroading for years.
Quite different. That current isn't fed back into any sort of battery or storage; it's just run off through resistance grids, as waste heat. The point there isn't the current charge, but to get a non-friction braking effect by reversing the action on the traction motors that drive the units.
 

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Worked with them for over 22 years.

I have never seen regenerative DB in a locomotive. Yes, there were prototype hybrids about - used by some yards as test-beds for startup manufacturers. The actual work would get done by conventional diesel-electrics - EMD and GE Rail were the only two manufacturers left. All the leftover Alcos had gone to tourist short lines, by the time I got in.

They ALL used resistance DB. Those that had dynamic braking - until the last ten years, not all did. CN was the last railroad to take a big order on locomotives without dynamic-braking - and it later served them ill when they expanded into the US, purchasing the WC and IC, and having rolling-hill tracks to run freight over. For about two years, I worked for them as a locomotive engineer.

Regenerative DB in a non-hybrid locomotive is an interesting idea - shut off the fuel rack and let the alternator spin up the prime mover for resistance, getting air pressure and cabin power - but as of four years ago, it's never been done.
 

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When I operated haul trucks with pantographs in the 90's the dream was to backfeed the grid but the energy was too dirty
 

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When I operated haul trucks with pantographs in the 90's the dream was to backfeed the grid but the energy was too dirty
That's odd. Because the Pennsylvania Railroad GG-1s, their famous electric locomotives, did exactly that. Backfed it to the system.

I never worked with electrified rail equipment. Conrail (where I started) had phased out the GG-1s about ten years before I hired on, and turned their electrified districts over to Amtrak. Electrified freight lines had the catenery lines taken down - in Conrail's lean start-up years - and sold for the scrap copper value.

But the guys who trained me, some of them had. They absolutely loved working with the GG-1s - infinite power control, and tremendous regenerative braking.

Odd that truck or trackless-trolley makers couldn't figure out what Baldwin Locomotive knew in the 1930s.
 

ErrosionOfAccord

#1 Global Warmer
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#39
Back in the days when Barrick had endless amounts of butt f8cked hedging money. They had big stupid dreams and the trolley trucks went the way of the cuckoo the first time the pit had to be laid back to the west.
 

GOLDZILLA

Harvurd Koleej Jeenyus
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#40
Just paint the car with solar cells and let the sun charge it during the day.