• "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

The Kalākaua Dollar

Bottom Feeder

Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
Midas Member
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
6,639
Likes
11,596
Location
Seattle
#1
Anyone have any of these in their collection?

The Kalākaua coinage is a set of silver coins of the Kingdom of Hawaii dated 1883. They were designed by Charles E. Barber, Chief Engraver of the United States Bureau of the Mint, and were struck at the San Francisco Mint. The issued coins are a dime (ten-cent piece), quarter dollar, half dollar, and dollar.

Kalākaua 1883 one dollar coin.jpg

The trade ties and cultural connections with the United States led the early Hawaii business community to think in terms of the US dollar, and it became the basis for trade, with the Hawaiian royal government periodically publishing tables of the value of non-US coins in terms of the dollar. This was necessary because such coins, brought to the islands by foreign trade, circulated as a means of exchange alongside American silver and gold pieces.

By 1883, most coins on the islands were American, due to the close economic integration between islands and mainland. The laws of Hawaii reflected this, making gold American coins legal tender for an unlimited amount and American silver coins legal tender to $50.

Having the kingdom issue its own coins was one means by which the government hoped to improve Native Hawaiian morale. The currency was to have the king's image on the obverse side, and Hawaii's coat of arms and motto Ua Mau ke Ea o ka ʻĀina i ka Pono (The Life of the Land is Perpetuated in Righteousness) on the reverse.

In March 1883, the cabinet council authorized government agent to contract with the United States Mint to have coins struck there. It provided for $1,000,000 in coins: $500,000 in silver dollars, $300,000 in half dollars, $125,000 in quarter dollars and $75,000 in dimes.

Mintage.JPG

They remained in circulation during the turbulent years of the 1890s in Hawaii, as the monarchy fell and the short-lived republic ended in 1898 with annexation to the United States. Despite the urging of local interests, it was not until 1903 that Congress acted, ordering that the Hawaii silver coins be exchanged by January 1, 1904, or lose status as legal tender. By 1907, coins worth about $814,000 of the $1,000,000 originally issued had been redeemed; they were exchanged for US silver and melted down at the San Francisco Mint.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalākaua_coinage
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
24,311
Likes
33,877
Location
Qmerica
#2

oldgaranddad

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Joined
Feb 21, 2012
Messages
4,437
Likes
7,232
Location
On the top shelf.
#3
Like US Philippine issues there is a very limited serious collector population for these hence the undervalued prices.
 

Mujahideen

Black Member
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
10,523
Likes
18,672
Location
Wakanda
#4
Learned something new, thanks.
 

mayhem

Created in 2006
Silver Miner
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
4,143
Likes
5,959
#5