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SongSungAU

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Biden's HHS Sec refuses to say 'mother' instead of 'birthing people' in hearing. (1 min 32 sec):


Published on Jun 12, 2021 by The News Junkie's Archives​
 

SongSungAU

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Some Babylon Bee humor....

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Ensoniq

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Heels up Harris says she’s an advocate for illegals

Here, she says she want to rebuild the immigration system to address the needs of other countries


 

Ensoniq

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Another one joins the Vince Foster club...

Man, now we’ve got to update all those Clinton body count memes

720E96FC-DD34-4FEC-BA48-FB0019FB2BC7.jpeg
 

Casey Jones

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How do pukes like that get hired to be teachers???!!!
They get into koledge because they're mine-ore-itty and keepin dem out be dis skim min nation.

They're shunted into Ejewkayshun bekuz dey can't do nuffin else.

An dey hired as tea churez because no one sane wants the job, anymore. REAL teachers are leaving in droves; most already have. That generation has taken early retirement or gone on to other things.
 

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I taught a girl how to count change back yesterday. She had pushed the wrong button & was dumbfounded. I told her the amount she owned me. Then taught her to count it back. It was $0.87. So I said and .03 makes 0.15 and a dime makes it 0.25 and .25 makes it .50 and .25 makes it .75 and .25 makes it an even dollar. She just stared.
 

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BUSINESS/ECONOMY, CDPHE, ENVIRONMENT, GOVERNOR POLIS, ORIGINAL REPORT, POLITICS, SCOTT WEISER, TRANSIT, TRANSPORTATION, UNCATEGORIZED

Polis pushing mandate on employers to regulate workers’ commutes; rulemaking bypasses legislature​

May 17, 2021 By Scott Weiser

DENVER–Colorado Governor Jared Polis wants to reduce air pollution by mandating that employers create commuting alternatives to their employees driving in single-occupancy vehicles (SOV).
The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) is proposing to implement new regulations that would force companies in the Denver Metro/North Front Range area with more than 100 employees to create “Employee Transportation Reduction Plans (ETRP).” This is in pursuit of an “ambitious” 2019 law that requires a 26% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2025 and a 90% reduction from 2005 levels by 2050.
CDPHE is a cabinet-level state agency that falls under the purview of Governor Polis. The new regulations would be implemented under the authority of the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission (AQCC), which is controlled by Polis appointees.
“That’s the most alarming part of what they’re trying to do,” Patrick McConnell, Coalitions Director for the Colorado chapter of Americans for Prosperity told Complete Colorado. “Legislating through the rule-making process is not the way to go about this. It needs transparency and accountability. This is something they should put through the people’s elected representatives.”
The stated goal is for large companies to “achieve an SOV Drive Rate of 75% or less” by 2022 and 60% by 2024 by offering employees a menu of options and subsidies as part of their mandatory ETRP.
The SOV Drive Rate is calculated by “dividing the number of employees who report or are assigned to a worksite, by the number of vehicles that arrive at the worksite, from all shifts, seven days a week, averaged over the calculation period.”
CDPHE is essentially farming out to large companies enforcement of something it cannot do on its own; tell people they can’t drive their own cars to work.
Forcing companies to come up with a plan that meets the standards set by CDPHE burdens employers with making employees obey, says McConnell. This could be as simple as saying “carpool or take the bus or get fired” if the costs of compliance are higher than those of finding more compliant employees.
“So, let’s say an employee comes to his boss and says, ‘Hey, what’s going on with all these changes? Why is this affecting my commute’,” McConnell said. “The business can then say, ‘This is something the government is forcing us to do.’ And if you go to the government, they can say, ‘Well that’s not our plan, that’s something the business is forcing you to do.’ So, it puts it puts everybody in a really, really tough situation.”

The cost of compliance​

The Colorado Regional Air Quality Council (CRAQC), in a draft analysis dated March 9, 2021, said that for the “approximately 511,000 employees at approximately 800 large employers (greater than 250 employees) in the Denver Metro/North Front Range ozone non-attainment area,” a full annual Regional Transportation District (RTD) transit subsidy would cost those employers $192,647,000 per year in total, or $240, 809 per year, per employer.
Two $10 RTD roundtrip day passes per week for each employee would cost $558,012,000.
Added to that is the cost of a state-required “Employer Transportation Coordinator” (ETC) who is to “develop, market, administer, and monitor the employers ETRP Plan(s) for an affected worksite(s).”
CRAQC estimates the cost would be $60,000 per year for salary and benefits and assumes that one employee would only work 1/10th of the time. That, they say, would cost $5,760,000 per year, or about $7,200 per affected company.
But the CRAQCC cost benefit analysis assumes that the regulation covers only 800 employers with more than 250 employees, whereas the CDPHE regulation includes employers with more than 100 employees, of which CDPHE says there are 2,763, totaling more than 877,000 employees, a 58% increase.
On top of that some businesses have more than one worksite with more than 100 employees, particularly building contractors. They would appear to have to have an ETC at each worksite, presumably monitoring and calculating the SOV drive rate every day by counting the number of vehicles “that arrive at the worksite” and figuring out how many are employees showing up each day.
A single 1/10th FTE (full-time equivalent) employee to do all this, even at one worksite, seems to be a substantial underestimation of what may in fact turn out to be an entire staff of company employees tasked to “develop, market, administer, and monitor” the ETRP plan.

‘Incentivizing’ alternative commuting nothing new​

CDPHE reports that “there are at least 27” demand management programs throughout the nation as well as private organizations in Colorado with voluntary plans.
One of them is run by Washington state and has been in operation since 2007.
The similarities between the CDPHE plan and Washington State Department of Transportation’s (WSDOT) Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) program aren’t likely accidental.
A 2019 report by WSDOT says that commuting trips to CTR sites are only 4% of total daily trips. The largest percentage is 42% for “family and personal errands,” followed by 27% for “social and recreational” activities, 15% for “other” trips and 12% “commute trips to non-CTR sites.”
In 2017 WSDOT said that “Half a million employees at more than 1,000 CTR-affected worksites…left about 22,400 cars at home every weekday,” and “increased their non-drive-alone trip rate from 34.3 percent to 39.1 percent.”
That’s a 4.4% decrease in the millions of cars on the highway each day.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau in 2019 of the 3,011,612 daily commuters in Colorado, 74.2% drove alone, 8.6% carpooled and only 3.2% used public transportation other than taxicabs.
Adding to the issue, RTD cut its service by about 40% during the pandemic and its not clear that previous, non-transit dependent riders will be willing to get back on public transit moving forward, regardless of what services may be restored.
This begs the question of whether the alternative transportation infrastructure needed to move 877,000 employees twice a day in a reasonable amount of time exists, or ever will exist.
For many people, waiting hours and hours for a rideshare to become available or walking that last mile (or three) from a crowded train station twice a day just isn’t going to work for them, not to mention those who need to do things other than going directly home after work, like shopping or picking up kids.
“We’re talking about families,” McConnell said. “It’s just going to create new barriers for folks getting to and from work each day, and family obligations come up when you least expect it. You can’t always rely on a “guaranteed” ride home. I think they need to take a step back and look more closely at the impacts.”
The Colorado Air Quality Control Commission will hold a Zoom meeting Thursday, May 20 beginning at 9:00 a.m. to hear the CDPHE rulemaking request. Register for the meeting here. Instructions for submitting written comments are available at the Zoom meeting link.
 

Ensoniq

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I want Polis to go play in traffic

But as the great philosopher Mick Jagger once said, you can’t always get what you want
 

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Joe King

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JayDubya

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Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee announced it will charge a fee for non-vaccinated students who wish to return to campus​


As the United States vaccinates more Americans, we’re fast approaching a conundrum: how do we encourage people to get vaccinated, while still respecting the privacy of those who can’t get the jab. Schools, especially, have the task of keeping everyone on the property safe, which is why Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee, has come up with a plan: charge people who don’t get vaccinated and don’t have an honest medical reason for why not.

Rest of article at link:

https://www.scarymommy.com/college-fee-covid-unvaccinated/?utm_source=yahoo&utm_campaign=feed
 

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BUSINESS/ECONOMY, CDPHE, ENVIRONMENT, GOVERNOR POLIS, ORIGINAL REPORT, POLITICS, SCOTT WEISER, TRANSIT, TRANSPORTATION, UNCATEGORIZED

Polis pushing mandate on employers to regulate workers’ commutes; rulemaking bypasses legislature​

May 17, 2021 By Scott Weiser

DENVER–Colorado Governor Jared Polis wants to reduce air pollution by mandating that employers create commuting alternatives to their employees driving in single-occupancy vehicles (SOV).
The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) is proposing to implement new regulations that would force companies in the Denver Metro/North Front Range area with more than 100 employees to create “Employee Transportation Reduction Plans (ETRP).” This is in pursuit of an “ambitious” 2019 law that requires a 26% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2025 and a 90% reduction from 2005 levels by 2050.
CDPHE is a cabinet-level state agency that falls under the purview of Governor Polis. The new regulations would be implemented under the authority of the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission (AQCC), which is controlled by Polis appointees.
“That’s the most alarming part of what they’re trying to do,” Patrick McConnell, Coalitions Director for the Colorado chapter of Americans for Prosperity told Complete Colorado. “Legislating through the rule-making process is not the way to go about this. It needs transparency and accountability. This is something they should put through the people’s elected representatives.”
The stated goal is for large companies to “achieve an SOV Drive Rate of 75% or less” by 2022 and 60% by 2024 by offering employees a menu of options and subsidies as part of their mandatory ETRP.
The SOV Drive Rate is calculated by “dividing the number of employees who report or are assigned to a worksite, by the number of vehicles that arrive at the worksite, from all shifts, seven days a week, averaged over the calculation period.”
CDPHE is essentially farming out to large companies enforcement of something it cannot do on its own; tell people they can’t drive their own cars to work.
Forcing companies to come up with a plan that meets the standards set by CDPHE burdens employers with making employees obey, says McConnell. This could be as simple as saying “carpool or take the bus or get fired” if the costs of compliance are higher than those of finding more compliant employees.
“So, let’s say an employee comes to his boss and says, ‘Hey, what’s going on with all these changes? Why is this affecting my commute’,” McConnell said. “The business can then say, ‘This is something the government is forcing us to do.’ And if you go to the government, they can say, ‘Well that’s not our plan, that’s something the business is forcing you to do.’ So, it puts it puts everybody in a really, really tough situation.”

The cost of compliance​

The Colorado Regional Air Quality Council (CRAQC), in a draft analysis dated March 9, 2021, said that for the “approximately 511,000 employees at approximately 800 large employers (greater than 250 employees) in the Denver Metro/North Front Range ozone non-attainment area,” a full annual Regional Transportation District (RTD) transit subsidy would cost those employers $192,647,000 per year in total, or $240, 809 per year, per employer.
Two $10 RTD roundtrip day passes per week for each employee would cost $558,012,000.
Added to that is the cost of a state-required “Employer Transportation Coordinator” (ETC) who is to “develop, market, administer, and monitor the employers ETRP Plan(s) for an affected worksite(s).”
CRAQC estimates the cost would be $60,000 per year for salary and benefits and assumes that one employee would only work 1/10th of the time. That, they say, would cost $5,760,000 per year, or about $7,200 per affected company.
But the CRAQCC cost benefit analysis assumes that the regulation covers only 800 employers with more than 250 employees, whereas the CDPHE regulation includes employers with more than 100 employees, of which CDPHE says there are 2,763, totaling more than 877,000 employees, a 58% increase.
On top of that some businesses have more than one worksite with more than 100 employees, particularly building contractors. They would appear to have to have an ETC at each worksite, presumably monitoring and calculating the SOV drive rate every day by counting the number of vehicles “that arrive at the worksite” and figuring out how many are employees showing up each day.
A single 1/10th FTE (full-time equivalent) employee to do all this, even at one worksite, seems to be a substantial underestimation of what may in fact turn out to be an entire staff of company employees tasked to “develop, market, administer, and monitor” the ETRP plan.

‘Incentivizing’ alternative commuting nothing new​

CDPHE reports that “there are at least 27” demand management programs throughout the nation as well as private organizations in Colorado with voluntary plans.
One of them is run by Washington state and has been in operation since 2007.
The similarities between the CDPHE plan and Washington State Department of Transportation’s (WSDOT) Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) program aren’t likely accidental.
A 2019 report by WSDOT says that commuting trips to CTR sites are only 4% of total daily trips. The largest percentage is 42% for “family and personal errands,” followed by 27% for “social and recreational” activities, 15% for “other” trips and 12% “commute trips to non-CTR sites.”
In 2017 WSDOT said that “Half a million employees at more than 1,000 CTR-affected worksites…left about 22,400 cars at home every weekday,” and “increased their non-drive-alone trip rate from 34.3 percent to 39.1 percent.”
That’s a 4.4% decrease in the millions of cars on the highway each day.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau in 2019 of the 3,011,612 daily commuters in Colorado, 74.2% drove alone, 8.6% carpooled and only 3.2% used public transportation other than taxicabs.
Adding to the issue, RTD cut its service by about 40% during the pandemic and its not clear that previous, non-transit dependent riders will be willing to get back on public transit moving forward, regardless of what services may be restored.
This begs the question of whether the alternative transportation infrastructure needed to move 877,000 employees twice a day in a reasonable amount of time exists, or ever will exist.
For many people, waiting hours and hours for a rideshare to become available or walking that last mile (or three) from a crowded train station twice a day just isn’t going to work for them, not to mention those who need to do things other than going directly home after work, like shopping or picking up kids.
“We’re talking about families,” McConnell said. “It’s just going to create new barriers for folks getting to and from work each day, and family obligations come up when you least expect it. You can’t always rely on a “guaranteed” ride home. I think they need to take a step back and look more closely at the impacts.”
The Colorado Air Quality Control Commission will hold a Zoom meeting Thursday, May 20 beginning at 9:00 a.m. to hear the CDPHE rulemaking request. Register for the meeting here. Instructions for submitting written comments are available at the Zoom meeting link.
I can tell ya how this ends.

The trickle of people LEAVING Colorado for other states, which exists and has been picking up...becomes a gusher. A stampede.

People don't want to live like this. They damn-sure didn't move to Denver to live like that.

And one of the luckiest moves in my life, was leaving Denver in 1996. I didn't want to go; my new job took me back to my hometown in Ohio. I took it to look after my aging parents, who were not well.

For years I schemed as to how I could move to the Southern Pacific railroad, and return to Denver. Finally, I gave up; and Conrail fell...and CSX drove me out...and nobody was hiring, thanks to the Hussein Recession.

Instead, I fell through Michigan (leaving it was another lucky break) Wisconsin (same, three years later) and Montana (jackpot of serendipity). And Denver has gone so far down, they have to look up to see the gutter.

Already we have plenty of New Montanans here with Colorado tags on their cars - until two weeks ago, the MVD was closed for Beer Cooties, registration renewal online, no way for new registration. So I get to see where my new neighbors belong.

It ain't the next county over.
 

ABC123

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Acosta is the captain of the ship of fools, he’’ll go down with the ship



https://twitter.com/JohnBasham/status/1403259974407626753?s=20
 

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North Korean defector says 'even North Korea was not this nuts' after attending Ivy League school​


Teny Sahakian
Mon, June 14, 2021, 10:07 AM


As American educational institutions continue to be called into question, a North Korean defector fears the United States' future "is as bleak as North Korea" after she attended one of the country's most prestigious universities.
Yeonmi Park has experienced plenty of struggle and hardship, but she does not call herself a victim.

One of several hundred North Korean defectors settled in the United States, Park, 27, transferred to Columbia University from a South Korean university in 2016 and was deeply disturbed by what she found.

"I expected that I was paying this fortune, all this time and energy, to learn how to think. But they are forcing you to think the way they want you to think," Park said in an interview with Fox News. "I realized, wow, this is insane. I thought America was different but I saw so many similarities to what I saw in North Korea that I started worrying."

Those similarities include anti-Western sentiment, collective guilt and suffocating political correctness.

Yeonmi saw red flags immediately upon arriving at the school.
During orientation, she was scolded by a university staff member for admitting she enjoyed classic literature such as Jane Austen.

"I said ‘I love those books.’ I thought it was a good thing," recalled Park.
"Then she said, 'Did you know those writers had a colonial mindset? They were racists and bigots and are subconsciously brainwashing you.’"

NEW YORK CITY'S MESSAGE TO KIM JONG UN HONORING OTTO WARMBIER

It only got worse from there as Yeonmi realized that every one of her classes at the Ivy League school was infected with what she saw as anti-American propaganda, reminiscent to the sort she had grown up with.
"’American Bastard' was one word for North Koreans" Park was taught growing up.

"The math problems would say 'there are four American bastards, you kill two of them, how many American bastards are left to kill?'"
She was also shocked and confused by issues surrounding gender and language, with every class asking students to announce their preferred pronouns.

"English is my third language. I learned it as an adult. I sometimes still say 'he' or 'she' by mistake and now they are going to ask me to call them 'they'? How the heck do I incorporate that into my sentences?"

"It was chaos," said Yeonmi. "It felt like the regression in civilization."
"Even North Korea is not this nuts," she admitted. "North Korea was pretty crazy, but not this crazy."

After getting into a number of arguments with professors and students, eventually Yeonmi "learned how to just shut up" in order to maintain a good GPA and graduate.

In North Korea, Yeonmi Park did not know of concepts like love or liberty.
"Because I have seen oppression, I know what it looks like," said Yeonmi, who by the age of 13 had witnessed people drop dead of starvation right before her eyes.

"These kids keep saying how they’re oppressed, how much injustice they've experienced. They don't know how hard it is to be free," she admonished.
"I literally crossed through the middle of the Gobi Desert to be free. But what I did was nothing, so many people fought harder than me and didn't make it."

Park and her mother first fled the oppressive North Korean regime in 2007, when Yeonmi was 13 years old.

After crossing into China over the frozen Yalu River, they fell into the hands of human traffickers who sold them into slavery: Yeonmi for less than $300 and her mother for roughly $100.

With the help of Christian missionaries, the pair managed to flee to Mongolia, walking across the Gobi Desert to eventually find refuge in South Korea.
In 2015 she published her memoir "In Order to Live," where she described what it took to survive in one of the world’s most brutal dictatorships and the harrowing journey to freedom.

"The people here are just dying to give their rights and power to the government. That is what scares me the most," the human right activist said.
She accused American higher education institutions of stripping people's ability to think critically.

"In North Korea I literally believed that my Dear Leader [Kim Jong-un] was starving," she recalled. "He's the fattest guy - how can anyone believe that? And then somebody showed me a photo and said 'Look at him, he's the fattest guy. Other people are all thin.' And I was like, 'Oh my God, why did I not notice that he was fat?' Because I never learned how to think critically."
"That is what is happening in America," she continued. "People see things but they've just completely lost the ability to think critically."


Witnessing the depth of American’s ignorance up close has made Yeonmi question everything about humanity.

"North Koreans, we don't have Internet, we don't have access to any of these great thinkers, we don't know anything. But here, while having everything, people choose to be brainwashed. And they deny it."
Having come to America with high hopes and expectations, Yeonmi expressed her disappointment.

"You guys have lost common sense to degree that I as a North Korean cannot even comprehend," she said.

"Where are we going from here?" she wondered. "There’s no rule of law, no morality, nothing is good or bad anymore, it's complete chaos."

"I guess that's what they want, to destroy every single thing and rebuild into a Communist paradise."
 

WillA2

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North Korean defector says 'even North Korea was not this nuts' after attending Ivy League school​


Teny Sahakian
Mon, June 14, 2021, 10:07 AM


As American educational institutions continue to be called into question, a North Korean defector fears the United States' future "is as bleak as North Korea" after she attended one of the country's most prestigious universities.
Yeonmi Park has experienced plenty of struggle and hardship, but she does not call herself a victim.

One of several hundred North Korean defectors settled in the United States, Park, 27, transferred to Columbia University from a South Korean university in 2016 and was deeply disturbed by what she found.

"I expected that I was paying this fortune, all this time and energy, to learn how to think. But they are forcing you to think the way they want you to think," Park said in an interview with Fox News. "I realized, wow, this is insane. I thought America was different but I saw so many similarities to what I saw in North Korea that I started worrying."

Those similarities include anti-Western sentiment, collective guilt and suffocating political correctness.

Yeonmi saw red flags immediately upon arriving at the school.
During orientation, she was scolded by a university staff member for admitting she enjoyed classic literature such as Jane Austen.

"I said ‘I love those books.’ I thought it was a good thing," recalled Park.
"Then she said, 'Did you know those writers had a colonial mindset? They were racists and bigots and are subconsciously brainwashing you.’"

NEW YORK CITY'S MESSAGE TO KIM JONG UN HONORING OTTO WARMBIER

It only got worse from there as Yeonmi realized that every one of her classes at the Ivy League school was infected with what she saw as anti-American propaganda, reminiscent to the sort she had grown up with.
"’American Bastard' was one word for North Koreans" Park was taught growing up.

"The math problems would say 'there are four American bastards, you kill two of them, how many American bastards are left to kill?'"
She was also shocked and confused by issues surrounding gender and language, with every class asking students to announce their preferred pronouns.

"English is my third language. I learned it as an adult. I sometimes still say 'he' or 'she' by mistake and now they are going to ask me to call them 'they'? How the heck do I incorporate that into my sentences?"

"It was chaos," said Yeonmi. "It felt like the regression in civilization."
"Even North Korea is not this nuts," she admitted. "North Korea was pretty crazy, but not this crazy."

After getting into a number of arguments with professors and students, eventually Yeonmi "learned how to just shut up" in order to maintain a good GPA and graduate.

In North Korea, Yeonmi Park did not know of concepts like love or liberty.
"Because I have seen oppression, I know what it looks like," said Yeonmi, who by the age of 13 had witnessed people drop dead of starvation right before her eyes.

"These kids keep saying how they’re oppressed, how much injustice they've experienced. They don't know how hard it is to be free," she admonished.
"I literally crossed through the middle of the Gobi Desert to be free. But what I did was nothing, so many people fought harder than me and didn't make it."

Park and her mother first fled the oppressive North Korean regime in 2007, when Yeonmi was 13 years old.

After crossing into China over the frozen Yalu River, they fell into the hands of human traffickers who sold them into slavery: Yeonmi for less than $300 and her mother for roughly $100.

With the help of Christian missionaries, the pair managed to flee to Mongolia, walking across the Gobi Desert to eventually find refuge in South Korea.
In 2015 she published her memoir "In Order to Live," where she described what it took to survive in one of the world’s most brutal dictatorships and the harrowing journey to freedom.

"The people here are just dying to give their rights and power to the government. That is what scares me the most," the human right activist said.
She accused American higher education institutions of stripping people's ability to think critically.

"In North Korea I literally believed that my Dear Leader [Kim Jong-un] was starving," she recalled. "He's the fattest guy - how can anyone believe that? And then somebody showed me a photo and said 'Look at him, he's the fattest guy. Other people are all thin.' And I was like, 'Oh my God, why did I not notice that he was fat?' Because I never learned how to think critically."
"That is what is happening in America," she continued. "People see things but they've just completely lost the ability to think critically."


Witnessing the depth of American’s ignorance up close has made Yeonmi question everything about humanity.

"North Koreans, we don't have Internet, we don't have access to any of these great thinkers, we don't know anything. But here, while having everything, people choose to be brainwashed. And they deny it."
Having come to America with high hopes and expectations, Yeonmi expressed her disappointment.

"You guys have lost common sense to degree that I as a North Korean cannot even comprehend," she said.

"Where are we going from here?" she wondered. "There’s no rule of law, no morality, nothing is good or bad anymore, it's complete chaos."

"I guess that's what they want, to destroy every single thing and rebuild into a Communist paradise."

She has had the benefit of a hard life of actual oppression and slavery which gives her perspective. Something Ivy League morons cannot buy.
 

Buck

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She has had the benefit of a hard life of actual oppression and slavery which gives her perspective. Something Ivy League morons cannot buy.
which of course is ironic because she, and others like her, come here to avoid this same type of treatment

we have arrived!
 

the_shootist

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which of course is ironic because she, and others like her, come here to avoid this same type of treatment

we have arrived!
It's not like anyone can do anything about it. You know... inclusion, tolerance, diversity and all that stuff prevents anyone from questioning the program lest they be considered a white supremacist.
 

Buck

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It's not like anyone can do anything about it. You know... inclusion, tolerance, diversity and all that stuff prevents anyone from questioning the program lest they be considered a white supremacist.
i just hope they get my cell painted the right color, before i arrive....

:summer:
 

Buck

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the_shootist

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that and a tab...not the soda either

i'm set for a few hours

:summer:

does the black guy come with the cell?

excellent! i'll need someone to wash my clothes......
Its my understanding that every white supremacist who is condemned to death get his own negro to help keep the cell tidy until the hanging takes place
 

Buck

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Its my understanding that every white supremacist who is condemned to death get his own negro to help keep the cell tidy until the hanging takes place
that means, like trading cards, the prisoners could swap them around

hmmmmm......

probably a Democratic Idea...except for the negros, of course
 

Casey Jones

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Its my understanding that every white supremacist who is condemned to death get his own negro to help keep the cell tidy until the hanging takes place
More likely the 'groid attendant does the hanging.

Or strangling.
 

the_shootist

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More likely the 'groid attendant does the hanging.

Or strangling.
The only thing that scrawny little negro can choke is his chicken! The urban hoodrats are brave when they're in numbers but one on one they're paper tigers
 

Casey Jones

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The only thing that scrawny little negro can choke is his chicken! The urban hoodrats are brave when they're in numbers but one on one they're paper tigers
That ain't their STYLE.

Little white girls.
 

newmisty

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the_shootist

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Eat the bugs!
Bake the cake!
Take the knee!
Accept the flag!
1623699597233.png

What's next? Suck our dicks????
 

the_shootist

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Now this was just plain uncalled for!

Say what you will about Fearless Leader Trump, he's still living rent free in their heads!

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