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The Left is Freaking Insane

the_shootist

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dacrunch

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Now Actively Excluding One State​

Bureaucrats huddled in some office somewhere failed to foresee the costs of their actions.

Sunday, June 20, 2021​

screen-shot-2021-06-18-at-125223-pm.png

The pandemic has undoubtedly hastened the shift to remote work. Many workers and companies have now embraced remote work in previously office-based positions, and this is continuing even as the economy reopens and new jobs are posted. Many new remote positions are being posted advertising that applicants can live anywhere in the US—except Colorado.
Here’s why.
“A new Colorado law… requires companies with even a few employees in the state to disclose the expected salary or pay range for each open role they advertise, including remote positions,” the Wall Street Journal reports. “The rule’s aim is to narrow gender wage gaps and provide greater pay transparency for employees.”
The result?
“To avoid having to disclose that information... some employers seeking remote workers nationwide are saying that those living in Colorado need not apply,” the Journal notes.

For example, a posting for a Johnson & Johnson job recently read: “Work location is flexible if approved by the Company except that position may not be performed remotely from Colorado.” Multiple job listings at Cardinal Health, Inc. advertise that “This is a remote, work from home position. This role is to be filled outside of the state of Colorado.”
You get the idea. A website, ColoradoExcluded.com, catalogs these postings and reports that at least 39 companies are actively discouraging Colorado residents from applying. Why?


Well, companies say that the Colorado regulations are burdensome and costly to comply with. And publicly posting all salary information not only undercuts employees’ privacy but also could fuel discontent and conflict within the company. Given the fact that they have 49 other options (and more if you count Washington, DC, Puerto Rico, etc.) it’s easier for some companies to just not hire people from the state.
This is certainly not what Colorado state lawmakers intended. They likely had good intentions of promoting transparency and equality, albeit ones based on a statistically dubious premise of the largely fictional sexist “gender pay gap.” But as Nobel-Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman once said, “One of the great mistakes is to judge policies and programs by their intentions rather than their results.” And the result of this regulatory overreach was to take jobs away from Coloradans, not make them more equitable.
Of course, few could have seen this coming when drafting salary transparency regulations. While easy enough to understand in hindsight, it would have taken tremendous foresight to predict that this would specifically lead to remote work positions discriminating against the state. But that’s exactly the problem with the government interfering in the minutiae of economic life. Bureaucrats huddled in some office somewhere can never fully foresee the vast and disparate consequences of their actions—meaning unintended consequences inevitably follow.
“Every human action has both intended and unintended consequences,” economist Antony Davies and political scientist James Harrigan explain. “Human beings react to every rule, regulation, and order governments impose, and their reactions result in outcomes that can be quite different than the outcomes lawmakers intended.”
Colorado lawmakers may not have intended to get applicants in their state discriminated against in remote work opportunities. But we should judge them not on their intentions, but on their results.
Like this story? Click here to sign up for the FEE Daily and get free-market news and analysis like this from Policy Correspondent Brad Polumbo in your inbox every weekday.




Brad Polumbo

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Brad Polumbo (@Brad_Polumbo) is a libertarian-conservative journalist and Policy Correspondent at the Foundation for Economic Education.
 

WillA2

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Now Actively Excluding One State​

Bureaucrats huddled in some office somewhere failed to foresee the costs of their actions.

Sunday, June 20, 2021​

screen-shot-2021-06-18-at-125223-pm.png

The pandemic has undoubtedly hastened the shift to remote work. Many workers and companies have now embraced remote work in previously office-based positions, and this is continuing even as the economy reopens and new jobs are posted. Many new remote positions are being posted advertising that applicants can live anywhere in the US—except Colorado.
Here’s why.
“A new Colorado law… requires companies with even a few employees in the state to disclose the expected salary or pay range for each open role they advertise, including remote positions,” the Wall Street Journal reports. “The rule’s aim is to narrow gender wage gaps and provide greater pay transparency for employees.”
The result?
“To avoid having to disclose that information... some employers seeking remote workers nationwide are saying that those living in Colorado need not apply,” the Journal notes.

For example, a posting for a Johnson & Johnson job recently read: “Work location is flexible if approved by the Company except that position may not be performed remotely from Colorado.” Multiple job listings at Cardinal Health, Inc. advertise that “This is a remote, work from home position. This role is to be filled outside of the state of Colorado.”
You get the idea. A website, ColoradoExcluded.com, catalogs these postings and reports that at least 39 companies are actively discouraging Colorado residents from applying. Why?


Well, companies say that the Colorado regulations are burdensome and costly to comply with. And publicly posting all salary information not only undercuts employees’ privacy but also could fuel discontent and conflict within the company. Given the fact that they have 49 other options (and more if you count Washington, DC, Puerto Rico, etc.) it’s easier for some companies to just not hire people from the state.
This is certainly not what Colorado state lawmakers intended. They likely had good intentions of promoting transparency and equality, albeit ones based on a statistically dubious premise of the largely fictional sexist “gender pay gap.” But as Nobel-Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman once said, “One of the great mistakes is to judge policies and programs by their intentions rather than their results.” And the result of this regulatory overreach was to take jobs away from Coloradans, not make them more equitable.
Of course, few could have seen this coming when drafting salary transparency regulations. While easy enough to understand in hindsight, it would have taken tremendous foresight to predict that this would specifically lead to remote work positions discriminating against the state. But that’s exactly the problem with the government interfering in the minutiae of economic life. Bureaucrats huddled in some office somewhere can never fully foresee the vast and disparate consequences of their actions—meaning unintended consequences inevitably follow.
“Every human action has both intended and unintended consequences,” economist Antony Davies and political scientist James Harrigan explain. “Human beings react to every rule, regulation, and order governments impose, and their reactions result in outcomes that can be quite different than the outcomes lawmakers intended.”
Colorado lawmakers may not have intended to get applicants in their state discriminated against in remote work opportunities. But we should judge them not on their intentions, but on their results.
Like this story? Click here to sign up for the FEE Daily and get free-market news and analysis like this from Policy Correspondent Brad Polumbo in your inbox every weekday.




Brad Polumbo

Brad Polumbo


Brad Polumbo (@Brad_Polumbo) is a libertarian-conservative journalist and Policy Correspondent at the Foundation for Economic Education.

Seems like Colorado is really trying to become the "Kalifornia" of the Rockies.
 

the_shootist

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Now Actively Excluding One State​

Bureaucrats huddled in some office somewhere failed to foresee the costs of their actions.

Sunday, June 20, 2021​

screen-shot-2021-06-18-at-125223-pm.png

The pandemic has undoubtedly hastened the shift to remote work. Many workers and companies have now embraced remote work in previously office-based positions, and this is continuing even as the economy reopens and new jobs are posted. Many new remote positions are being posted advertising that applicants can live anywhere in the US—except Colorado.
Here’s why.
“A new Colorado law… requires companies with even a few employees in the state to disclose the expected salary or pay range for each open role they advertise, including remote positions,” the Wall Street Journal reports. “The rule’s aim is to narrow gender wage gaps and provide greater pay transparency for employees.”
The result?
“To avoid having to disclose that information... some employers seeking remote workers nationwide are saying that those living in Colorado need not apply,” the Journal notes.

For example, a posting for a Johnson & Johnson job recently read: “Work location is flexible if approved by the Company except that position may not be performed remotely from Colorado.” Multiple job listings at Cardinal Health, Inc. advertise that “This is a remote, work from home position. This role is to be filled outside of the state of Colorado.”
You get the idea. A website, ColoradoExcluded.com, catalogs these postings and reports that at least 39 companies are actively discouraging Colorado residents from applying. Why?


Well, companies say that the Colorado regulations are burdensome and costly to comply with. And publicly posting all salary information not only undercuts employees’ privacy but also could fuel discontent and conflict within the company. Given the fact that they have 49 other options (and more if you count Washington, DC, Puerto Rico, etc.) it’s easier for some companies to just not hire people from the state.
This is certainly not what Colorado state lawmakers intended. They likely had good intentions of promoting transparency and equality, albeit ones based on a statistically dubious premise of the largely fictional sexist “gender pay gap.” But as Nobel-Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman once said, “One of the great mistakes is to judge policies and programs by their intentions rather than their results.” And the result of this regulatory overreach was to take jobs away from Coloradans, not make them more equitable.
Of course, few could have seen this coming when drafting salary transparency regulations. While easy enough to understand in hindsight, it would have taken tremendous foresight to predict that this would specifically lead to remote work positions discriminating against the state. But that’s exactly the problem with the government interfering in the minutiae of economic life. Bureaucrats huddled in some office somewhere can never fully foresee the vast and disparate consequences of their actions—meaning unintended consequences inevitably follow.
“Every human action has both intended and unintended consequences,” economist Antony Davies and political scientist James Harrigan explain. “Human beings react to every rule, regulation, and order governments impose, and their reactions result in outcomes that can be quite different than the outcomes lawmakers intended.”
Colorado lawmakers may not have intended to get applicants in their state discriminated against in remote work opportunities. But we should judge them not on their intentions, but on their results.
Like this story? Click here to sign up for the FEE Daily and get free-market news and analysis like this from Policy Correspondent Brad Polumbo in your inbox every weekday.




Brad Polumbo

Brad Polumbo


Brad Polumbo (@Brad_Polumbo) is a libertarian-conservative journalist and Policy Correspondent at the Foundation for Economic Education.
You reap what you sow and you accept what you tolerate! The government is taking bread off the tables of the voters who pay their salary (not that voting matters but, that's beside the point). Hopefully at some point, that little tidbit is going to resonate with them enough to get them off the couch and in their politician's face!
 

Buck

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And publicly posting all salary information not only undercuts employees’ privacy but also could fuel(s) discontent and conflict within the company.
happened nearly every pay raise someone else gave me, they would say: "Keep It To Yourself"

i've not thought of a 'colder' employer statement, think about it
if you're working for a company that pushes 'keeping secrets', that means sometimes you're not gonna hear the stuff you need to hear, and emergencies will probably be normal happenings...

one moment of 'pushback' they just might flip the story and begin to blame you, then you'll hear nothing about any future projects...
 

ABC123

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OK THIS IS GOOD!!
WATCH
https://media.8kun.top/file_store/4...70f56ffb3d912e59a1d1e7a67fd589190469e13b1.mp4

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The Pennsbury School District is in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Please read the links below. Then like and share this video with everyone. A recording of the full meeting is availale here if you would like to see all the public comments: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4UgSMB4M70Y

What is happening in the Pennsbury School District is disturbing. As of June 18, 2021 Pennsbury has posted video of of its March 18, 2021 and May 20, 2021 school board meetings on its website and these tapes say "edited due to content" in places. See http://video.pennsburysd.org/ (May 20th meeting at 35m10s & 1hr40m00s). What has been cut from the posted tapes is public comment by citizens opposed to critical race theory.

The video here was recorded by the Pennsbury School District using taxpayer funds. The meeting was live-streamed by Pennsbury as it happened. After the meeting ended, late into the evening on June 17, 2021, the video was published by Pennsbury on Pennsbury's YouTube channel under the status "public" at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTj1HxZlp7U. I downloaded the entirety of the meeting from this Pennsbury posted weblink in the early hours of June 18, 2021. I did so, thinking that the school district (based on its prior censorship acts) might take the video down or edit it in some way. Once downloaded, I then uploaded it to my own channel. If the Pennsbury posted version at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTj1HxZlp7U today says "private", or the link does not work, it is only because Pennsbury removed the video from public view after initially posting it publicly. If you oppose the censorship of Pennsbury's public meetings please contact the elected public officials on the Pennsbury school board at https://www.pennsburysd.org/SchoolBoard.aspx.

Pennsbury's Director of Equity, Diversity & Education, Dr. Cherissa Gibson, in an email dated March 20, 2021 at 2:20pm to Superintendent Gretzula and School Board President Toy-Dragoni, released under the Right-to-Know-Law, is seen promoting a government agenda of censoring public comment with which she disagrees. Read for yourself the censorship agenda of Dr. Gibson: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vwVm0fYjfmLokGMTzmKSUqr3Z2ZK31hR/view

Read the Pennsbury School Board President, Christine Toy-Dragoni, gleefully tell the public she will go along with the censorship agenda of Dr. Gibson: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Wq4cYx5uRDwRhBPBP8xHjuTTzym_JmzC/view

The school solicitor who tried to shout down my public comment is solicitor Michael Clarke of the law firm Rudolph Clarke LLC: https://rudolphclarke.com/meet-our-attorneys/michael-p-clarke/

A summary of the constitutional case law that I cited in my comments (1964's landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision in New York Times v. Sullivan) can be read here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Times_Co._v._Sullivan

The United States, as Justice Brennan noted, is founded on the "profound national commitment to the principle that debate on public issues should be uninhibited, robust, and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic, and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials."

The Pennsbury School Board is not allowed to enact a policy that supersedes a higher law and there is no higher law than the United States Constitution. These government officials at Pennsbury, with their critical race theory agenda, mistakenly believe that all power in inherent in the Government. They are wrong as a matter of law. In the United States of America all power in inherent in the People.

My right to petition the Pennsbury School Board to terminate the employment of Dr. Gibson is a protected Noerr-Pennington petitioning right under the First Amendment. See e.g. NAACP v. Claiborne Hardware Co., 458 U.S. 886, 914, 102 S.Ct. 3409, 73 L.Ed.2d 1215 (1982). https://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=7271075303659098319

In Harrisburg, PA State Representative Russ Diamond, has introduced House Bill 1532 that would make it illegal to teach public school children much of what constitutes Critical Race Theory. Read Rep. Diamond's sponsorship memorandum here: https://www.legis.state.pa.us//cfdocs/Legis/CSM/showMemoPublic.cfm?chamber=H&SPick=20210&cosponId=35697.

Please contact your state lawmakers to ask them to support the passage of House Bill 1352: https://www.legis.state.pa.us/cfdocs/legis/home/findyourlegislator/

Like and Share with everyone you know!
 

Ensoniq

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ABC123

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Gov. Newsom - who is facing a recall election - declares California will pay off ALL unpaid rent for lower income households accrued during pandemic using $5.2billion 'forgiveness' pot


Gavin Newsom has announced that California will pay off all unpaid rent accrued during the pandemic using a $5.2 billion federal pot 'on a scale never seen before in the US.'
The Governor, who is facing a recall election expected in the fall, is also likely to extend a ban on evictions for unpaid rent beyond June 30 - a pandemic-related order that was meant to be temporary but is proving difficult to undo.
'California is planning rent forgiveness on a scale never seen before in the United States,' Newsom wrote on Twitter Monday night, quoting a New York Times article.

The 53-year-old Democrat, who finds his state flush with unused federal Covid relief cash and surplus tax income, is also going to splash another $2 billion to cover the costs of electricity and water for lower income households.
Announcing the measures last week, Newsom said: 'Anybody that's been impacted by this pandemic that can't pay their rent, we will pay 100 percent of your rent going back to April of last year.
'Anybody that's impacted by this pandemic that can't pay their rent and can't afford their water bill or their utility, California will pay those bills.'

California had anticipated dire budget shortfalls when Newsom announced lockdowns last year.
But the state, like many others, finds itself with more money than expected after Congress bailed out local governments from federal coffers.
California is poised to cover not just unpaid rent, but also another $12 billion back to taxpayers through stimulus checks worth $600 to millions of middle-class citizens.
Such is the abundance in funds sloshing around, Republican lawmakers in D.C. have argued that the Biden administration should recoup some of the surplus for its planned infrastructure upgrades.
California's budget has also been buoyed by the tech boom amid the pandemic, with some of the state's top earners helping to pump the treasury full by selling their stocks and mansions.
The state relies heavily on the incomes of the wealthy and achieves surpluses in years when the market does well - which it did, particularly for Silicon Valley, throughout 2020.

The rental relief programme is going to be available to residents who earn no more than 80 percent the median income in their area and who can prove financial hardship amid the pandemic.
In San Francisco, a family of four would have to earn less than $146,350 to qualify.
Newsom has been meeting with legislative leaders privately to negotiate the allocation of the state's $260 billion operating budget, with a raft of generous measures on the table including a brand new education bill, buying hotels and apartments for the homeless and to waive traffic violation fines for poor people.
The Governor and the executive branch are fine tuning their rental scheme, but it promises to be a colossally generous programme.

'Nationwide this is certainly the largest rent relief there's ever been,' Russ Heimerich, a spokesman for the California Business, Consumer Services and Housing Agency, told The New York Times. 'The big question is can we spend it all.'
California has $5.2 billion to pay off people's rent, money from multiple aid packages approved by Congress.
That appears to be more than enough to cover all of the unpaid rent in the state, according to Jason Elliott, senior counselor to Newsom on housing and homelessness.
But the state has been slow to distribute that money, and it's unlikely it can spend it all by June 30.
A report from the California Department Housing and Community Development showed that of the $490 million in requests for rental assistance through May 31, just $32 million has been paid. That doesn't include the 12 cities and 10 counties that run their own rental assistance programs.

Gavin Newsom talks during a news conference at Universal Studios in Universal City, California on June 15

http://www.domigood.com/2021/06/gov-newsom-who-is-facing-recall.html
 

WillA2

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Gov. Newsom - who is facing a recall election - declares California will pay off ALL unpaid rent for lower income households accrued during pandemic using $5.2billion 'forgiveness' pot


Gavin Newsom has announced that California will pay off all unpaid rent accrued during the pandemic using a $5.2 billion federal pot 'on a scale never seen before in the US.'
The Governor, who is facing a recall election expected in the fall, is also likely to extend a ban on evictions for unpaid rent beyond June 30 - a pandemic-related order that was meant to be temporary but is proving difficult to undo.
'California is planning rent forgiveness on a scale never seen before in the United States,' Newsom wrote on Twitter Monday night, quoting a New York Times article.

The 53-year-old Democrat, who finds his state flush with unused federal Covid relief cash and surplus tax income, is also going to splash another $2 billion to cover the costs of electricity and water for lower income households.
Announcing the measures last week, Newsom said: 'Anybody that's been impacted by this pandemic that can't pay their rent, we will pay 100 percent of your rent going back to April of last year.
'Anybody that's impacted by this pandemic that can't pay their rent and can't afford their water bill or their utility, California will pay those bills.'

California had anticipated dire budget shortfalls when Newsom announced lockdowns last year.
But the state, like many others, finds itself with more money than expected after Congress bailed out local governments from federal coffers.
California is poised to cover not just unpaid rent, but also another $12 billion back to taxpayers through stimulus checks worth $600 to millions of middle-class citizens.
Such is the abundance in funds sloshing around, Republican lawmakers in D.C. have argued that the Biden administration should recoup some of the surplus for its planned infrastructure upgrades.
California's budget has also been buoyed by the tech boom amid the pandemic, with some of the state's top earners helping to pump the treasury full by selling their stocks and mansions.
The state relies heavily on the incomes of the wealthy and achieves surpluses in years when the market does well - which it did, particularly for Silicon Valley, throughout 2020.

The rental relief programme is going to be available to residents who earn no more than 80 percent the median income in their area and who can prove financial hardship amid the pandemic.
In San Francisco, a family of four would have to earn less than $146,350 to qualify.
Newsom has been meeting with legislative leaders privately to negotiate the allocation of the state's $260 billion operating budget, with a raft of generous measures on the table including a brand new education bill, buying hotels and apartments for the homeless and to waive traffic violation fines for poor people.
The Governor and the executive branch are fine tuning their rental scheme, but it promises to be a colossally generous programme.

'Nationwide this is certainly the largest rent relief there's ever been,' Russ Heimerich, a spokesman for the California Business, Consumer Services and Housing Agency, told The New York Times. 'The big question is can we spend it all.'
California has $5.2 billion to pay off people's rent, money from multiple aid packages approved by Congress.
That appears to be more than enough to cover all of the unpaid rent in the state, according to Jason Elliott, senior counselor to Newsom on housing and homelessness.
But the state has been slow to distribute that money, and it's unlikely it can spend it all by June 30.
A report from the California Department Housing and Community Development showed that of the $490 million in requests for rental assistance through May 31, just $32 million has been paid. That doesn't include the 12 cities and 10 counties that run their own rental assistance programs.

Gavin Newsom talks during a news conference at Universal Studios in Universal City, California on June 15

http://www.domigood.com/2021/06/gov-newsom-who-is-facing-recall.html

Trying to buy votes?
 

the_shootist

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Gov. Newsom - who is facing a recall election - declares California will pay off ALL unpaid rent for lower income households accrued during pandemic using $5.2billion 'forgiveness' pot


Gavin Newsom has announced that California will pay off all unpaid rent accrued during the pandemic using a $5.2 billion federal pot 'on a scale never seen before in the US.'
The Governor, who is facing a recall election expected in the fall, is also likely to extend a ban on evictions for unpaid rent beyond June 30 - a pandemic-related order that was meant to be temporary but is proving difficult to undo.
'California is planning rent forgiveness on a scale never seen before in the United States,' Newsom wrote on Twitter Monday night, quoting a New York Times article.

The 53-year-old Democrat, who finds his state flush with unused federal Covid relief cash and surplus tax income, is also going to splash another $2 billion to cover the costs of electricity and water for lower income households.
Announcing the measures last week, Newsom said: 'Anybody that's been impacted by this pandemic that can't pay their rent, we will pay 100 percent of your rent going back to April of last year.
'Anybody that's impacted by this pandemic that can't pay their rent and can't afford their water bill or their utility, California will pay those bills.'

California had anticipated dire budget shortfalls when Newsom announced lockdowns last year.
But the state, like many others, finds itself with more money than expected after Congress bailed out local governments from federal coffers.
California is poised to cover not just unpaid rent, but also another $12 billion back to taxpayers through stimulus checks worth $600 to millions of middle-class citizens.
Such is the abundance in funds sloshing around, Republican lawmakers in D.C. have argued that the Biden administration should recoup some of the surplus for its planned infrastructure upgrades.
California's budget has also been buoyed by the tech boom amid the pandemic, with some of the state's top earners helping to pump the treasury full by selling their stocks and mansions.
The state relies heavily on the incomes of the wealthy and achieves surpluses in years when the market does well - which it did, particularly for Silicon Valley, throughout 2020.

The rental relief programme is going to be available to residents who earn no more than 80 percent the median income in their area and who can prove financial hardship amid the pandemic.
In San Francisco, a family of four would have to earn less than $146,350 to qualify.
Newsom has been meeting with legislative leaders privately to negotiate the allocation of the state's $260 billion operating budget, with a raft of generous measures on the table including a brand new education bill, buying hotels and apartments for the homeless and to waive traffic violation fines for poor people.
The Governor and the executive branch are fine tuning their rental scheme, but it promises to be a colossally generous programme.

'Nationwide this is certainly the largest rent relief there's ever been,' Russ Heimerich, a spokesman for the California Business, Consumer Services and Housing Agency, told The New York Times. 'The big question is can we spend it all.'
California has $5.2 billion to pay off people's rent, money from multiple aid packages approved by Congress.
That appears to be more than enough to cover all of the unpaid rent in the state, according to Jason Elliott, senior counselor to Newsom on housing and homelessness.
But the state has been slow to distribute that money, and it's unlikely it can spend it all by June 30.
A report from the California Department Housing and Community Development showed that of the $490 million in requests for rental assistance through May 31, just $32 million has been paid. That doesn't include the 12 cities and 10 counties that run their own rental assistance programs.

Gavin Newsom talks during a news conference at Universal Studios in Universal City, California on June 15

http://www.domigood.com/2021/06/gov-newsom-who-is-facing-recall.html
Good, the state should turn over what ever money it has left in its coffers to the people and, to the CA taxpayers... stupid should hurt!
 

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Nuesome handing out FEDERAL TAX DOLLARS, not CALIFORNIA TAX DOLLARS.
We're ALL paying for this GRAND THEFT.

Many years ago, I knew an old lady who would only pay a percentage of her income taxes each year, deducting what she considered "that she didn't agree with in the Budget". Every year they'd take her to court and they'd win... But it didn't deter her...
 

the_shootist

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Nuesome handing out FEDERAL TAX DOLLARS, not CALIFORNIA TAX DOLLARS.
We're ALL paying for this GRAND THEFT.

Many years ago, I knew an old lady who would only pay a percentage of her income taxes each year, deducting what she considered "that she didn't agree with in the Budget". Every year they'd take her to court and they'd win... But it didn't deter her...
CA needs to secede as quickly as possible. They're killing us!
 

dacrunch

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ABC123

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Boris Johnson's DADDY wrote some books

Starting to make the connection????


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ABC123

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Sarah Huckabee Sanders, [21.06.21 22:58]

At 15 weeks, unborn babies have a heartbeat. They have faces. They can feel pain. They are human.https://twitter.com/rncresearch/status/1407037189830086659



https://twitter.com/rncresearch/status/1407037189830086659

RNC Research

Press Secretary Jen Psaki refuses to say if Biden believes a 15-week-old, unborn baby is a human being



https://t.me/SarahHuckabee/215
 

ABC123

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Woke Ideology Mimics Precursors to Totalitarian Slaughter, Experts Say

June 21, 2021

Some of the core tenets of the “woke” ideology spreading around the country mimic ideas used to justify many of the most horrendous atrocities of the past century, according to several experts.

A recently released documentary exploring the topic, called “Better Left Unsaid,” concludes that the self-identified “radical left” endorses four fundamental “truths” that they “hold to be self-evident,” noting that these tenets have also been used to justify and incite many of the worst massacres of the 20th century…..

https://www.theepochtimes.com/woke-ideology-mimics-precursors-to-totalitarian-slaughter-experts-say_3865035.html

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ABC123

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The Loudoun County School Board got wrecked so hard by former Virginia State senator @SenRichardBlack

that they had to shut down their public hearing.

“You’re teaching children to hate others because of their skin color… I’m disgusted by your bigotry.”
VIDEO

https://twitter.com/ForAmerica/status/1407487997180878848

https://twitchy.com/brettt-3136/2021/06/22/public-comment-shut-off-loudoun-county-sheriffs-office-declares-school-board-meeting-an-unlawful-assembly-arrests-two/
 

Goldhedge

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Home schooling never looked better!

Parents need to change their lifestyle to solve this 'problem'... don't need a mansion on the hill....
 

Goldhedge

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Now Actively Excluding One State​

Bureaucrats huddled in some office somewhere failed to foresee the costs of their actions.
Government used to tax frontage - the front of a business that faced the street.

Owners got creative and set back the 2nd story 20 (or so) feet from the front.

You can still see buildings in some old frontier towns with a 2nd floor setback.
 

Buck

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don't need a mansion on the hill....
that's not how capitalism works...

the truth be told:
We All Need, Our Lives Will Be Better,

IF

We Owned 4 McMansions like she does...

1624463097443.png


and get this:

Fact check: Missing context in claim about Black Lives Matter co-founder's property purchases​


it's 'validated', there's little / no truth to it, she's honest and honorable, in a communist sorta way, just toss in some consumer spending and she'll be someone to invite to dinner next wednesday...

so, it's perfectly fine to lie cheat and steal, then deny it / spin it all away

then enjoy the fruits of your labors with your lover

1624463303691.png


The American Dream has all turned a bit...

twisted, for my taste
 

JayDubya

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Gov. Newsom - who is facing a recall election - declares California will pay off ALL unpaid rent for lower income households accrued during pandemic using $5.2billion 'forgiveness' pot

'Anybody that's been impacted by this pandemic that can't pay their rent, we will pay 100 percent of your rent going back to April of last year.
'Anybody that's impacted by this pandemic that can't pay their rent and can't afford their water bill or their utility, California will pay those bills.'
So.....that reads "anybody who can't pay their rent". My question is, what about those who can but simply chose not to?
 

ABC123

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The Loudoun County School Board got wrecked so hard by former Virginia State senator @SenRichardBlack

that they had to shut down their public hearing.

“You’re teaching children to hate others because of their skin color… I’m disgusted by your bigotry.”
VIDEO

https://twitter.com/ForAmerica/status/1407487997180878848

https://twitchy.com/brettt-3136/2021/06/22/public-comment-shut-off-loudoun-county-sheriffs-office-declares-school-board-meeting-an-unlawful-assembly-arrests-two/
Parents protesting against critical race theory broke into the national anthem when the Loudoun Co., Virginia school board ended public comment because the crowd got too out of hand


https://twitter.com/gabriellaborter/status/1407459094106152964
 

the_shootist

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Parents protesting against critical race theory broke into the national anthem when the Loudoun Co., Virginia school board ended public comment because the crowd got too out of hand


https://twitter.com/gabriellaborter/status/1407459094106152964
How are these school board members keep their jobs? It seems from the video that the esteemed board members got the hell outta there before this display of patriotism took place. Are the people not aware that, instead of breaking out into song, they can remove those folks at any time by just grabbing them by the scruff of the neck and kicking them out the door?

Update: It seems the cops declared that the people were conducting an unlawful assembly. What a fucking joke! The shootin' part of the people's restlessness with leftist authority seems not so far off now!

 
Last edited:

ABC123

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1624591451783.png

https://twitter.com/GretchenInOK/status/1407334345900179474?s=19
 

Casey Jones

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SongSungAU

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How are these school board members keep their jobs? It seems from the video that the esteemed board members got the hell outta there before this display of patriotism took place. Are the people not aware that, instead of breaking out into song, they can remove those folks at any time by just grabbing them by the scruff of the neck and kicking them out the door?

Update: It seems the cops declared that the people were conducting an unlawful assembly. What a fucking joke! The shootin' part of the people's restlessness with leftist authority seems not so far off now!


Parent arrested during school board meeting 'chaos' speaks out on 'Tucker' (6 min 06 sec):


Published on Jun 23, 2021 by Fox News​
 

SongSungAU

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JayDubya

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China says Wuhan Lab Scientists Deserve Nobel Prize

China’s government-run media outlets are reporting that, instead of being blamed for leaking the coronavirus, the Wuhan Virology lab scientists should be awarded the Nobel Prize for being the first to sequence the virus.

Naturally it’s only a matter of time before the World Health Organization throws its weight behind this recommendation...

Or for the Big Tech companies to censor anyone who says this is a completely absurd idea...

Or for the Twitter mob to accuse anyone who doesn’t support China’s Nobel Prize push as an anti-Asian racist.

Click here to read the full story.
 

JayDubya

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LinkedIn censors China experts at request of China

Speaking of China, the Microsoft-owned networking and resume website LinkedIn has been helping China censor intellectual dissidents.

One academic, Jojje Olsson, who has written five books on China, received a message from LinkedIn stating that if he did not edit his profile, it would be blocked in China.

That was because it mentioned a graduate thesis he wrote on the Tiananmen Square massacre.

He’s not the only one. According to the Wall Street Journal, LinkedIn complied with 38 of 42 requests from China last year to remove content— the most of any country.

Apparently telling the truth, even about your own background, is enough to have you struck off the Big Tech platforms.

Click here to read the full story.