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The Lunar Gold Rush: How Moon Mining Could Work

michael59

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#43
Space would also be a good way to get rid of garbage. Send up a rocket full of it to the sun. It would be a hell of an incinerator. I could also see the mob buying small rockets to get rid of the bodies.
Love it. We could send all our high grade radio active waste into the sun....if it comes back at us then we know we are in real trouble. Or, or we could miss and the sun$ gravity could slow it down and we'd run into it 6months later. Saves storing it here.
 

the_shootist

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#44
Love it. We could send all our high grade radio active waste into the sun....if it comes back at us then we know we are in real trouble. Or, or we could miss and the sun$ gravity could slow it down and we'd run into it 6months later. Saves storing it here.
...along with all our low grade politicians
 

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#46
Not if we run back into them.....just say'n
Nope, they go straight to the Sun. They don't pass GO and they most certainly do NOT collect $200
 

michael59

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#47
Ur killing me here.

If you aren't kidding about the we never went to the moon then to shoot a bunch of politicians riding a rocket full of nuclear waste into the sun is tantamount of saying why don't we just piss into the wind or up a rope.

Oh well I'm burnt cookies here.......

Love ya all buts gots ta go....
 

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#48
Who actually gave Obama or Congress the rights to decide who could have the rights to things in space?
 

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#49
Who actually gave Obama or Congress the rights to decide who could have the rights to things in space?
I was wondering that myself.
 

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#50
Space business: US citizens get right to mine asteroids
(RT)


https://youtu.be/U93ux6HUGDM

Published on Dec 3, 2015
US lawmakers have decided to expand the reach of capitalism into the universe, and make celestial bodies a source of income. President Barack Obama signed an act giving US companies the right to the commercial exploration of asteroids and other bodies in space.
 
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searcher

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#51
There’s Big Money to Be Made in Asteroid Mining

Jeff Desjardins
on November 2, 2016 at 12:44 pm

Click below to expand to the full version of the infographic



Image courtesy of: Wired

There’s Big Money to Be Made in Asteroid Mining
See the full version of the infographic.

If humans were ever able to get their hands on just one asteroid, it would be a game-changer.

That’s because the value of many asteroids are measured in the quintillions of dollars, which makes the market for Earth’s annual production of raw metals – about $660 billion per year – look paltry in comparison.

The reality is that the Earth’s crust is saddled with uneconomic materials, while certain types of asteroids are almost pure metal. X-type asteroids, for example, are thought to be the remnants of large asteroids that were pulverized in collisions in which their dense, metallic cores got separated from the mantle.

There is one such X-type asteroid near earth that is believed to hold more platinum than ever mined in human history.

Near-Earth Mining Targets
Asteroid mining companies such as Planetary Resources and Deep Space Industries are the first-movers in the sector, and they’ve already started to identify prospective targets to boldly mine where no man has mined before.

Both companies are looking specifically at near-Earth asteroids in the near-term, which are the easiest ones to get to. So far, roughly 15,000 such objects have been discovered, and their orbits all come in close proximity to Earth.

Planetary Resources has identified eight of these as potential targets and has listed them publicly, while Deep Space Industries has claimed to have “half a dozen very, very attractive targets”.

While these will be important for verifying the feasibility of asteroid mining, the reality is that near-Earth asteroids are just tiny minnows in an ocean of big fish. Their main advantage is that they are relatively easy to access, but most targets identified so far are less than 1,000 ft (300 m) in diameter – meaning the potential economic payoff of a mission is still unclear.

Where the Money is Made
The exciting part of asteroid mining is the asteroid belt itself, which lies between Mars and Jupiter. It is there that over 1 million asteroids exist, including about 200 that are over 60 miles (100 km) in diameter.

NASA estimates this belt to hold $700 quintillion of bounty. That’s about $100 billion for each person on Earth.

There are obviously many technical challenges that must be overcome to make mining these possible. As it stands, NASA aims to bring back a grab sample from the surface of asteroid Bennu that is 2 and 70 ounces (about 60 to 2,000 grams) in size. The cost of the mission? Approximately $1 billion.

To do anything like that on a large scale will require robots, spacecraft, and other technologies that simply do not exist yet. Further, missions like this could cost trillions of dollars – a huge risk and burden in the case that a mission is unsuccessful.

Until then, the near-Earth asteroids are the fertile testing ground for aspirational asteroid miners – and we look forward to seeing what is possible in the future.

http://www.visualcapitalist.com/theres-big-money-made-asteroid-mining/
 

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#52
Galactic gold rush: the tech companies aiming to make space mining a reality

Asteroids and the moon contain vast quantities of natural resources, including water, that could be worth billions and fuel a new phase of space exploration



An artist’s impression of Planetary Resources’ Arkyd 200 spacecraft on a mission to mine an asteroid. Photograph: Planetary Resources
Dan Tynan in San Francisco


@tynanwrites



Tuesday 6 December 2016 07.00 EST
Many tech entrepreneurs will promise you the moon. Naveen Jain is hoping to deliver it.

Five years ago, the founder of dotcom search giant InfoSpace set his sights on actual space, creating Moon Express, a startup with the then outlandish goal of mining the moon for minerals.

Last August, Moon Express became the first private company to receive permission from the Federal Aviation Administration to land a craft on the lunar surface. By the end of 2017, it plans to launch its first exploratory mission to our nearest neighbor in the solar system.

If successful, Jain’s company may collect the $25m Google Lunar XPRIZE, which has been promised to the first private firm to land on the moon, travel at least 500 meters and transmit high-definition images back from the surface.

Jain isn’t proposing to drill holes in the moon or strip-mine Mons Huygens which, at 18,000 feet, is the tallest peak on the lunar landscape. Most of the treasure he seeks is on the ground, deposited by millions of meteors that have struck the lunar surface over the past 4bn years. And he hates the term “space mining”.

“Mining has such a negative connotation, people think you’re drilling a hole and destroying things,” he says. “This is more like collecting or harvesting.”

But Jain’s ambitions are much bigger. Like other tech billionaires entering the space race, he hopes to lower the costs of space travel, help enable the colonization of the moon and later Mars – and make a tidy profit along the way.

“To rephrase John F Kennedy, we choose to go to the moon not because it is easy, but because it is a great business,” Jain jokes. “The second reason is the moon is the perfect training ground for going to Mars.”

Robots and snowballs
Moon Express is not the only company aiming to get a piece of the gold rush that’s about to happen hundreds of thousands of miles above our heads.

Deep Space Industries (DSI) is building autonomous spacecraft that can extract materials from asteroids. It expects to launch its first experimental mission in 2017, and send its Prospector 1 autonomous craft to a near-Earth asteroid by the end of the decade, says Meagan Crawford, vice-president of strategic communications for DSI.

Planetary Resources – a company backed in part by Google’s Larry Page and Eric Schmidt, as well as the government of Luxembourg – is also developing technology that will allow it to begin exploring asteroids starting around the year 2020.

What’s out there worth mining? Every element known to mankind, in virtually infinite amounts.

In 2014, the financial services site Motley Fool estimated the mineral wealth of the moon to be between $150 quadrillion and $500 quadrillion – enough to create 500m billionaires. Add in the riches found inside asteroids, and the sky is literally the limit.

The moon, for example, is abundant in Helium-3, an extremely rare element on Earth that could theoretically be used as fuel in future nuclear fusion plants. Asteroids are typically chock full of iron, nickel, cobalt, platinum and titanium.

But the real gold, at least initially, is water. Many near-Earth asteroids are abundant in carbonaceous chondrites that contain a lot of ice, says Crawford. Think of an enormous dirty snowball, winging around the sun at 55,000 miles an hour. Now imagine landing a robot on that snowball that can extract the ice and haul it away.

“Water is the fuel of space,” Crawford says. “The constituent parts are liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen – that’s rocket fuel. We’re also working on technology that uses superheated water itself as a propellant, so you don’t have to separate the oxygen and hydrogen.”

More than 90% of the weight of modern rockets is the fuel, Jain notes. As companies like SpaceX and Blue Origin begin launching reusable vehicles, fuel becomes the biggest cost of going into space. The less of it you have to carry, the cheaper space travel becomes.

In this scheme, asteroids would essentially be gas stations, allowing ships to carry just enough fuel to emerge from Earth’s gravity well, then fill up their tanks as they head toward their final destination.

US Commercial Space Launch Competitiveness Act, signed by President Obama in November 2015.

While the law stipulates that no nation can claim ownership of an asteroid or other heavenly body (in accordance with the Outer Space Treaty of 1967), US companies will be able to extract and own any materials they find in the great beyond.

Other countries have yet to adopt similar treaties, though Luxembourg is close to passing similar legislation, Crawford says.

“We expect in the next few years there will be several bilateral and multilateral agreements that will settle on an international convention for how this is going to be regulated, similar to how deep-sea mining is handled today,” she says.

‘Shiny things in a stream’
But for now, space mining is an industry still waiting for its moment. Even with SpaceX and Blue Origin slashing launch costs, sending anything into space remains a radically expensive proposition. The market for raw materials to build moonbases or refueling stations to enable busloads of Mars colonists has yet to materialize.

While all three mining companies are planning launches next year, none expect to begin extracting anything of value from space until well into the next decade.

“The cost of space transportation will have to come down drastically before it becomes economical to transport minerals to Earth from asteroids,” notes William Ostrove, aerospace and defense analyst for Forecast International. “If colonies on the moon or Mars become a reality, it may be cheaper to mine resources on asteroids rather than transport them from Earth. But that’s also decades away.”


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The moon’s surface as photographed by Apollo 17. Valuable minerals could be easily available on the surface. Photograph: Nasa
Even then, the first efforts are likely to be modest, says Lewicki. “Gold mining didn’t start as a massive industrial operation with complicated machinery and complex supply chains,” he says. “It started with a Levi’s-wearing gentleman looking for shiny things in a stream and picking them up. Space mining is likely to start out as something pretty simple as well.”

In the meantime, Planetary Resources has begun launching compact Earth observation satellites for use in agriculture, environmental monitoring and energy industries. It allows the company to generate revenue while it waits for the space mining industry to take off, and gives it a chance to test and refine the technology it will use to detect water and minerals in space.

“Lots of people got wind of the gold rush, cashed in their fortunes, got on a wagon headed west and staked their claims,” says Lewicki. “And most of them failed. Nine out of 10 startups fail as well. Success isn’t assured for anyone in this business, but the opportunity is clearly there.”

The ‘Pokémon Go of the moon’
Like Bezos, Musk, and other tech billionaires, Jain is hoping to bring down the marginal costs of space exploration low enough to enable entrepreneurs to come up with solutions not yet imagined – just as the PC, internet and iPhone spurred innovation no one at that time could foresee.

“When Steve Jobs asked people what apps they wanted to see on the iPhone, not a single person said ‘Hey, I would like to throw the birds at the pigs,’” says Jain. “But that’s what people did. Once we land there, someone else will build the Angry Birds and Pokémon Go of the moon.”

And, like Musk, he’s trying to use his personal wealth to ensure the future of humanity by enabling it to expand beyond our planet’s fragile boundaries.

He’s also a hopeless romantic.

“Moon rocks themselves may be the most valuable thing – they are beautiful,” says Jain, who gave a moon rock to his wife for their 25th anniversary, and claims to own the largest private collection of meteorites in the world.

“They could replace diamonds. You simply change the paradigm: ‘Anyone can give her a diamond. If you love her enough, you’ll give her the moon.’”

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/dec/06/space-mining-moon-asteroids-tech-companies
 

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#53
NASA reveals 'ShadowCam' that could finally reveal the trillions of dollars of deposits that could be mined from the moon's surface
  • Much of the lunar surface is hidden by permanent shadow, hiding resources
  • NASA has now selected instrument that can investigate these areas
  • The 'ShadowCam' uses 800 times more sensitive than those on current orbiters
  • Will look for volatiles, such as water, to understand distribution and abundance


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4457228/NASA-reveals-plan-lunar-ShadowCam-seek-deposits.html#ixzz4ffeIa4oU
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
 

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#54
Octogenarian Elon Musk Superfan Has Some Plans For The Moon
By Thornton McEnery

Post a Comment / Feb 22, 2018 at 12:27 PM



Sometimes you get stoned to watch CNBC, and sometimes watching CNBC gets you stoned. Earlier today, we had one of the latter.

In what can only be described as a moment from one of our wildest dreams made manifest on screen, perpetually almost unconscious Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross was interviewed by the Squawk Box team and spent a few glorious minutes chatting with Joe Kernen about turning the moon into “a gas station for outer space.”

NO, this really fucking happened.

Because this was a conversation with Kernen, the jumping off point was a question about privatizing and deregulating something, in this case; space. Kernen (who called Ross “The Space Czar” and was basically immediately told by Ross to please stop) wanted to know how pumped Wilbur was about his new responsibilities regarding monetizing space.

And as much as any man who is – medically-speaking – sleepwalking through life can be psyched, Wilbur Ross is totes jacked, y’all! To the wondrous transcript!:

ROSS: WE THINK THE PACE OF REGULATORY CHANGE HAS TO MATCH THE PACE OF TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE. TECHNOLOGY IS BOOMING. YOU SAW THIS INCREDIBLE SpaceX LAUNCH, WHICH I WAS PRIVILEGED TO BE AT. AND IT WAS REALLY QUITE AN AMAZING THING. AND AT THE END OF IT, HAVE YOU THAT LITTLE RED TESLA HURDLING OFF TO AN ORBIT AROUND THE SUN AND THE MOON.

Oh, to see the world through the eyes of an exhausted 80-year-old who views the universe as a wondrous thing…ready to be strip-mined and sold for parts. We’re not saying that it’s not adorable how excited an old corporate raider gets when watching Elon Musk shoot a sports car into space, and thinking he understands what that means for the future. We’re saying it’s spectacularly adorable and incomprehensibly dumb.

But it got even “better” when Kernen essentially asked Wilbur how soon he could start investing in asteroid mining futures, to which Wilbur Ross replied thusly:

ROSS: WELL, I THINK THAT DEPENDS UPON HOW SUCCESSFUL WE ARE IN TURNING THE MOON INTO A KIND OF GAS STATION FOR OUTER SPACE. THE DARK SURFACES THAT YOU SEE WHEN YOU LOOK UP AT THE MOON ARE ACTUALLY HUNDREDS OF FEET OF SOLID ICE, SO THE PLAN IS TO BREAK THE ICE DOWN INTO HYDROGEN AND OXYGEN, USE THOSE AS THE FUEL PROPELLANT. SO WHAT IT WOULD MEAN IS THAT THE LIFTOFF AGAINST THE GRAVITY OF EARTH WOULD FOUGHT NEED TO BE NEARLY THE 5 MILLION 100 POUNDS OF THRUST THAT SpaceX HAD TO HAVE, BECAUSE YOU WOULD NOW ONLY HAVE TO GET TO THE MOON. AND THEN AT THE MOON, YOU HAVE VERY LOW GRAVITY, SO YOU DON’T NEED SO MUCH THRUST TO GO FROM THE MOON TO MARS, FOR EXAMPLE, OR TO ANOTHER ASTEROID. SO THE TECHNOLOGICAL BREAKTHROUGH REALLY IS GOING TO BE IN THE NUMBER OF AREAS, ONE OF WHICH SHOULD BE USING THE MOON AS A GAS STATION.

Now, do go watch the video but if you can’t, please re-read that amazing thought in the voice of a 138-year-old man who spends his days whittling on his porch at the edge of an overgrown cornfield. Because that’s what listening to Wilbur Ross talk about space sounds like.

The Trump Administration has truly outdone itself here with what we are calling a triple-layer cake of batshit political provocation. Not only is it making an aggressive move into what it is now hilariously calling “Space Commerce,” they put Wilbur “The Slipper King” Ross in charge of it and sent him on national television to be the voice of a brave new frontier in futuristic space policy.

We’re not saying that this is a nonsensical approach, but we are saying that we look forward to the president doing more of this kind of thinking and bringing Gary Busey into the White House as a special policy assistant on sobriety and motorcycle safety.

Wilbur Ross on space race: We want to turn the moon into a gas station [CNBC]

https://dealbreaker.com/2018/02/octogenarian-elon-musk-superfan-has-some-plans-for-the-moon/


 

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#55
The World's First Trillionaire Will Be A Space Miner

by Tyler Durden
Thu, 04/19/2018 - 22:15



Authored by Michael Kern via SafeHaven.com,

Famous astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson and Goldman Sachs share a common belief: The next trillion-dollar industry will be in the mining sector - in outer space.



As Neil deGrasse Tyson puts it:

"The first trillionaire there will ever be is the person who exploits the natural resources on asteroids. There's this vast universe of limitless energy and limitless resources. I look at wars fought over access to resources. That could be a thing of the past, once space becomes our backyard."

While the renowned astrophysicist sees the potential for peace, Goldman Sachs sees the radical arrival of a trillion-dollar mining industry in the 21st Century.



It may sound like a long-term gamble, but Goldman has been eyeing improvements in technology and the trends toward lowers costs for manufacturing spacecraft.



A year ago, Goldman noted in a 98-page report:

"While the psychological barrier to mining asteroids is high, the actual financial and technological barriers are far lower. Prospecting probes can likely be built for tens of millions of dollars each and Caltech has suggested an asteroid-grabbing spacecraft could cost $2.6bn.”


So, science fiction is becoming the narrative of reality, and radical opinions are starting to seem rather sober.

All the more because the whole idea is being given a major boost in Luxembourg of all places.

Asteroid mining is being led by private sector interests that are dead set on making money in outer space.

Two of the leading companies formed with this in mind are California-based Deep Space Industries and Washington-based Planetary Resources. Both have been operating for several years, and both plan on profiting from asteroid mining.

But the tiny European country of Luxembourg is hoping to become the hub of cosmic mining—a tax haven banking center-turned-asteroid-exploiter. So it’s no mystery why Deep Space Industries, for instance, has offices both in Luxembourg as well and a partnership with the government of Luxembourg.

Luxembourg is home to a few communication satellite companies and has a similar asteroid mining law to the U.S. law, which makes the small nation an attractive alternative to the U.S. market. This European country sees massive opportunity and plans to be way ahead of the game.

"Our goal is to put into place an overall framework for the exploration and commercial use of resources from 'celestial bodies' such as asteroids, or from the moon," said Etienne Schneider, Luxembourg's Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of the Economy.​

Once a famous steel producer, an experienced commercial satellite hub, and now famed for private banking and low-tax base, Luxembourg’s mining and financial backgrounds make it a prime candidate for the race to cosmic natural resources.

The first European private satellite operator, Société Européenne des Satellites, was launched in 1985 and today it’s the second-biggest commercial satellite operator in the world.

Luxembourg started working on an asteroid mining bill since 2016 that came into force last year, giving companies ownership over whatever, they extract from celestial bodies. This law is very similar to Obama's law signed in 2015, which also gives mining companies the right to keep their cosmic loot.

Both laws also take advantage of a loophole in the United Nation's Outer Space Treaty, which states that nations can't claim and occupy the moon and other celestial bodies—but it doesn’t say anything about what’s extracted from them.

There won’t be any ownership of asteroids, either.

The only difference between these laws is that in the case of Luxembourg, companies don’t have to be based in the country in order to enjoy protection. An office will suffice.

Luxembourg established the Space Resources initiative in 2016 and earmarked $223 million of its national space budget to provide early-stage funding and grants to companies working toward space mining.

Deep Space Industries and Planetary Resources are already working closely with Luxembourg's government, which contributed an undisclosed amount of R&D funding to Deep Space Industries and struck a deal with Planetary Resources in 2016 for a $28 million investment in exchange for undisclosed equity in the company.

While there may be limitless natural resources from asteroid mining, as deGrasse Tyson notes, the first commercial commodity is likely to be precious water.

It may be decades before anyone actually starts ‘fracking’ an asteroid and delivering new natural resources, but when it happens, Luxembourg will have secured its place on the space map as a definitive hub.

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-04-19/worlds-first-trillionaire-will-be-space-miner

 

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#56
Way too expensive to get there, send or build or repair mining equipment there, get whatever you find refined there or sent back here to be refined.
In short, at this time it would be the biggest boondoggle since the Federal Reserve/Cali bullet train.

2c,
R.
 

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#57
If you hear someone launching a space mining company, I can't stress this strongly enough, SHORT THE CRAP OUT OF THE STOCK!
 

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#58

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#60
Moon Fuel: A New Multi-Trillion Dollar Treasure


by Tyler Durden
Fri, 06/29/2018 - 20:30



Authored by Mining.com via OilPrice.com,

India’s space program wants to go where no nation has gone before – to the south side of the moon.



And once it gets there, it will study the potential for mining a source of waste-free nuclear energy that could be worth trillions of dollars.
The nation’s equivalent of NASA will launch a rover in October to explore virgin territory on the lunar surface and analyze crust samples for signs of water and helium-3. That isotope is limited on Earth yet so abundant on the moon that it theoretically could meet global energy demands for 250 years if harnessed.

“The countries which have the capacity to bring that source from the moon to Earth will dictate the process,’’ said K. Sivan, chairman of the Indian Space Research Organisation. “I don’t want to be just a part of them, I want to lead them.’’

The mission would solidify India’s place among the fleet of explorers racing to the moon, Mars and beyond for scientific, commercial or military gains. The governments of the U.S., China, India, Japan and Russia are competing with startups and billionaires Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson to launch satellites, robotic landers, astronauts and tourists into the cosmos.

The rover landing is one step in an envisioned series for ISRO that includes putting a space station in orbit and, potentially, an Indian crew on the moon. The government has yet to set a timeframe.

The mission would solidify India’s place among the fleet of explorers racing to the moon, Mars and beyond for scientific, commercial or military gains.

“We are ready and waiting,’’ said Sivan, an aeronautics engineer who joined ISRO in 1982. “We’ve equipped ourselves to take on this particular program.’’​

China is the only country to put a lander and rover on the moon this century with its Chang’e 3 mission in 2013. The nation plans to return later this year by sending a probe to the unexplored far side.

In the U.S., President Donald Trump signed a directive calling for astronauts to return to the moon, and NASA’s proposed $19 billion budget this fiscal year calls for launching a lunar orbiter by the early 2020s.

ISRO’s estimated budget is less than a 10th of that – about $1.7 billion – but accomplishing feats on the cheap has been a hallmark of the agency since the 1960s. The upcoming mission will cost about $125 million – or less than a quarter of Snap Inc. co-founder Evan Spiegel’s compensation last year, the highest for an executive of a publicly traded company, according to the Bloomberg Pay Index.

This won’t be India’s first moon mission. The Chandrayaan-1 craft, launched in October 2008, completed more than 3,400 orbits and ejected a probe that discovered molecules of water in the surface for the first time.

The upcoming launch of Chandrayaan-2 includes an orbiter, lander and a rectangular rover. The six-wheeled vehicle, powered by solar energy, will collect information for at least 14 days and cover an area with a 400-meter radius.

The rover will send images to the lander, and the lander will transmit those back to ISRO for analysis.

A primary objective, though, is to search for deposits of helium-3. Solar winds have bombarded the moon with immense quantities of helium-3 because it’s not protected by a magnetic field like Earth is.

The presence of helium-3 was confirmed in moon samples returned by the Apollo missions, and Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Schmitt, a geologist who walked on the moon in December 1972, is an avid proponent of mining helium-3.

There are an estimated 1 million metric tons of helium-3 embedded in the moon — enough to meet the world’s current energy demands for at least two, and possibly as many as five, centuries.

“It is thought that this isotope could provide safer nuclear energy in a fusion reactor, since it is not radioactive and would not produce dangerous waste products,’’ the European Space Agency said.​

There are an estimated 1 million metric tons of helium-3 embedded in the moon, though only about a quarter of that realistically could be brought to Earth, said Gerald Kulcinski, director of the Fusion Technology Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a former member of the NASA Advisory Council.

That’s still enough to meet the world’s current energy demands for at least two, and possibly as many as five, centuries, Kulcinski said. He estimated helium-3’s value at about $5 billion a ton, meaning 250,000 tons would be worth in the trillions of dollars.

To be sure, there are numerous obstacles to overcome before the material can be used – including the logistics of collection and delivery back to Earth and building fusion power plants to convert the material into energy. Those costs would be stratospheric.

“If that can be cracked, India should be a part of that effort,’’ said Lydia Powell, who runs the Centre for Resources Management at the New Delhi-based Observer Research Foundation think tank. “If the cost makes sense, it will become a game-changer, no doubt about it.’’

Plus, it won’t be easy to mine the moon. Only the U.S. and Luxembourg have passed legislation allowing commercial entities to hold onto what they have mined from space, said David Todd, head of space content at Northampton, England-based Seradata Ltd. There isn’t any international treaty on the issue.

“Eventually, it will be like fishing in the sea in international waters,’’ Todd said. “While a nation-state cannot hold international waters, the fish become the property of its fishermen once fished.’’

India’s government is reacting to the influx of commercial firms in space by drafting legislation to regulate satellite launches, company registrations and liability, said GV Anand Bhushan, a Chennai-based partner at the Shardul Amarchand Mangaldas & Co. law firm. It doesn’t cover moon mining.

Yet the nation’s only spaceman isn’t fully on board with turning the moon into a place of business.

Rakesh Sharma, who spent almost eight days aboard a Russian spacecraft in 1984, said nations and private enterprises instead should work together to develop human colonies elsewhere as Earth runs out of resources and faces potential catastrophes such as asteroid strikes.

“You can’t go to the moon and draw boundaries,’’ Sharma said. “I want India to show that we’re capable of utilizing space technology for the good of people.’’

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-06-29/moon-fuel-new-multi-trillion-dollar-treasure
 

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#61
LOL so silly. Even if this were true, it would just result in currency/metal deflation and we'd still be in the same economic position as we are currently. It's like printing 100x as much money and then saying everyone is 100x richer. Or even if this were all gold, it would make gold as plentiful as sand and thus 1000x gold would make it worthless. Articles like this just crack me up.
 

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#62
Do people still really believe we went to the moon?
 

searcher

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#64
Do people still really believe we went to the moon?
Rumor has it we went there, were greeted by some not too friendly peeps and told to split and never come back. Then again it's just a rumor.
 

goldielox1

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#65

Joe King

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#66
I think Joking and Solarian might.
Yet another example of your ignorance.
...and usually ignorance is excusable, but in your case it's willful.
 

Cigarlover

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#67
If private ownership of the moon is possible than i claim it as mine now. All of it.. I am willing to sell off 1/4 acre lots though. Special low introductory price of only 1000 a lot. extra special deal if you buy 4 I only charge for the first 3. yes, you heard that right, you buy 3 you get 1 absolutely free.. More lots are better to provide more privacy as well.
No need to overload my PM's right away, there is plenty of moon to go around. Unless of course someone makes me an offer for the entire planet that I can't refuse. Yes I call it a planet because it is as large as Pluto.
 

goldielox1

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#68
Yet another example of your ignorance.
...and usually ignorance is excusable, but in your case it's willful.
Was I wrong? Do you believe in the moon landings?
 

the_shootist

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#69
We're trying to save a nation and you guys are talking about mining gold on the Moon? :spaceship:
 

Joe King

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#70

Cigarlover

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#71
Far more often than not, you are.
Exactly. By the time there's any mining on the Moon, anyone alive today will be but a footnote in a history book.
Within 10 years we can have robots on the moon doing all the mining we want. Solar powered of course. As long as they only mine the light side of the moon. The dark side is off limits. :belly laugh:
 

Bottom Feeder

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#72
Asteroid mining will produce the world’s first trillionaire

BGR
(Boy Genius Report)
There’s lots of ways to make money here on planet Earth, but the world’s first trillionaire is going to make their fortune in space. That’s the prediction of Goldman Sachs, who sees space mining as the next frontier in fortune building. According to the investment and banking company, technology is approaching a point where mining asteroids is nearing feasibility, and the first company that makes the leap will be rewarded with riches beyond its wildest dreams.
There’s plenty of money to be made with ventures like these. For instance, the asteroid 16 Psyche, located in the asteroid belt region between Mars and Jupiter it is estimated that the iron extractable from that asteroid alone would be worth $10,000 quadrillion. The value of minerals from such space rocks will be so huge that it could destroy the prices of commodities and cause chaos in the world’s economy.

And things are heating up with the Asteroid Mining Corporation from England joining Luxembourg, a leader in the satellite communications industry, who sees an opportunity to play host to entrepreneurs and start-ups with their sights on space. And in doing so, becoming the worldwide hub of the space mining industry in the process.

Two of the leading companies in the field have been operating for several years already: Deep Space Industries, based in Mountain View, California, and Planetary Resources, based in Redmond, Washington.

The moon? Who cares about mining the stinking moon? We don't need no more cheese. We'll build a holiday inn and you can vacation there. (well maybe your great-great grandkids will).

Have faith,
BF
 

oldgaranddad

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#73
There will be no asteroid mining or moon colonies or space stations for the very same reason if you try to dredge an island out of the sea like China did they will find some reason why you can't. All of a sudden that sand bar or sea mount will have some rare species of something that must be saved. The powers that be do not want any new countries, colonies, etc. The proposed partitioning of Iraq into three states along ethnic lines after the second gulf war proved the hand of TPTB. A moon colony would be much akin to a new country and the elites view that as their domain only. The technology for lunar colonies has been around for years but governments held the rocket monopoly. Yes! They will let little Elon spend his billions on SpaceX but in the end the governments will wind up with the company and its technologies and little Elon will just be footnote somewhere. I'd bet gold on it! The cliques that control countries don't want others in their club hence the sudden one world government push the past few decades. One bureaucracy to rule them all. Lunar and space colonies would destroy the elites little socialist monopolies and allow free men to be free of their asinine laws and policies that enable the free loading classes to thrive.
 

goldielox1

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#74
Far more often than not, you are.
Exactly. By the time there's any mining on the Moon, anyone alive today will be but a footnote in a history book.
Funny how you try to claim I'm wrong all the while without answering the question. Time to put up or shut up.Are you a moon landing believer?
 

Joe King

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#75
Funny how you try to claim I'm wrong all the while
That's only because its true, you are wrong most of the time. Heck, how many times now is it that you've had to be educated about the meanings of the words you use? Several times now that I know of. lol

Time to put up or shut up.Are you a moon landing believer?
I'd say it's time for you shut up. Ie: you obviously haven't been paying much attention. Same as with everything else you post about too. lol
 

goldielox1

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#76
That's only because its true, you are wrong most of the time. Heck, how many times now is it that you've had to be educated about the meanings of the words you use? Several times now that I know of. lol


I'd say it's time for you shut up. Ie: you obviously haven't been paying much attention. Same as with everything else you post about too. lol
LOL I'll take that as a guilty diversion. I was right yet again. My statement stands: Joe King and Solarian are the gullible types that would believe in the moon landings.
 

Joe King

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#77
LOL I'll take that as a guilty diversion. I was right yet again. My statement stands: Joe King and Solarian are the gullible types that would believe in the moon landings.
Careful, your ignorance is showing again.
...and I'm just havin' fun with you because it's obvious you haven't been paying much attention. Especially considering your apparent obsession with me and Sol. lol
 

goldielox1

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#78
Careful, your ignorance is showing again.
...and I'm just havin' fun with you because it's obvious you haven't been paying much attention. Especially considering your apparent obsession with me and Sol. lol
Actually I have been paying attention. That's how I know that you and Solarian are the perfect candidates to believe in the moon landing fairy tale. You two have a well documented history of irrationality.

I wouldn't call it obsession. More like it reminds me of a kid in class that wets his pants everyday. It's funny yet pitiful but regardless entertaining and you talk about it at recess.
 

Joe King

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#79
Actually I have been paying attention.
Maybe in your dreams. lol

I wouldn't call it obsession.
I would. Do you see me referring to you in threads unrelated to ones we're already having an exchange in? No, you don't. Why? Because I couldn't care less about you.

You, on the other hand, have made reference to me and/or Sol in several threads. I'd call that an obsession. At the least we're certainly on your mind a lot.
You on the other hand are only on my mind when I'm responding to your drivel. Like now.
 
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goldielox1

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#80
Maybe in your dreams. lol

I would. Do you see me referring to you in threads unrelated to ones we're already having an exchange in? No, you don't. Why? Because I couldn't care less about you.

You, on the other hand, have made reference to me and/or Sol in several threads. I'd call that an obsession. At the least we're certainly on your mind a lot.
You on the other hand are only on my mind when I'm responding to our drivel. Like now.
Well honestly the post I responded to was almost the perfect setup. It was asking about if anyone was so gullible to believe in the landings and I thought for a second about who's the most non-reality based person(s) on these forums and you two popped into my mind as perfect candidates. I guess it was the perfect storm question.