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The new Random Pictures Thread:

Goldhedge

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I tried to let it go in my yard. It caught the bug it is holding before it even left the jar. It kept getting attacked by ants anywhere I let it go so I kept him as a pet for a while feeding it flies.
I had a gallon jar with a Black Widow in it for about 18 months.

I'd feed her bugs too. Grasshoppers mostly. She was fascinating.

I went to CSU library and looked up Black Widows. The most common Black Widow spider bite was in men. It wasn't until the 1950's that getting bit by a spider declined.

Reason? Indoor plumbing! Most places had an out house and Black Widows loved to habitat in them. Men would naturally sit and dangle and that's where they'd get the bite.

Back to my spider in a jar... She made a web nest that was akin to half of a sugar cone leaning against the side of the jar. Narrow on top and splayed out at the bottom. I'd toss in a hopper that would get stuck in the web and she'd go into action. She'd locate it and quickly immobilize it by biting it in one of the leg joints where it was most vulnerable. Her venom is a nerve agent.

Using her back legs while holding on to the web with the other six she would take one toe and touch her bottom where the spinnerets are located. She'd grab a thread end and pull it down and with the opposing leg she'd grab the other end - I'm not sure how it detached from her spinneret, but it now looked like a sticky 'rope'. She'd toss it on the hopper and quickly repeat the process many times until it was entangled quite well.

The grasshopper was still trying to escape so she'd bite it again and go back to tossing rope. Eventually, it was covered in sticky webbing. It was then she would hover over the hopper, touch it with her spinneret and spin the grasshopper as a thread would emit from her bottom. After a fashion the grasshopper was neatly wrapped up into a cocoon. She'd pull it 3/4 of the way up the nest and let it hang between the nest and the side of the jar. Every few hours she'd drop down from the apex and feed off the hanging meal.

Eventually, after she finished sucking the juices she'd cut the threads suspending the hopper and it would drop to the bottom of the jar. She was a very efficient killing machine. The bottom was littered with carcasses of dead bodies.

One night I got up to pee and decided to check on her. She was busy up top laying eggs in a 1/4" diameter half-moon of webbing. I watched as she finished her task and went to completing the egg sack. She then touched her spinneret to the ball over and over while spinning it as if to glue it all together. It was impervious to water and very tough to rip open. Eventually they hatched and I had hundreds of Black Widows (male and female) in the jar. I had to replace the cover with a cover that had smaller air holes as they were small enough to crawl out! There was cannibalism amongst siblings and I think mom also partook as I'd see shells of tiny spider remains from time to time.

She lasted through the winter and shriveled up like a raisin in the Sun as I had no bugs to feed her. I thought she had died. Come Spring I tossed a hopper in and she came alive and went after dinner! She recovered to live a few more months until I forgot that I Sevine'd the yard and tossed in a bug. The Sevin killed her.

I don't know how she fertilized the eggs. She must have mated at some point prior to my catching her in the house and stored the sperm in her Spermathecae.
 

WillA2

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Been meaning to reply to this post. Really appreciate your wisdom.
When I turned 35 I was so busy it was like a surprise. I had to think about how old I was and for a moment I didn't know if I was 25 or 35. Then I was asking myself "Where did the last 10 years go?". Crazy that it was 6 years ago.

Since this is the random pics thread, I figured I would ask myself what I was doing 10 years from now. The closest pic I could find for 10 years from now is this jumping spider on 4/21/2010. A coworker at the time caught it and brought it in a jar figuring I might like it. Heh, that's me.. I named him Geronimo. I tried to let it go in my yard. It caught the bug it is holding before it even left the jar. It kept getting attacked by ants anywhere I let it go so I kept him as a pet for a while feeding it flies.

View attachment 164134
Cool pic. Reminds me of nice little fella I saw while working in Florida one day. A wolf spider. That leaf he is on is bigger than my hand. The pic does not do him justice.

Spider_03_cropped.jpg
 

EricTheCat

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I had a gallon jar with a Black Widow in it for about 18 months.

I'd feed her bugs too. Grasshoppers mostly. She was fascinating.

I went to CSU library and looked up Black Widows. The most common Black Widow spider bite was in men. It wasn't until the 1950's that getting bit by a spider declined.

Reason? Indoor plumbing! Most places had an out house and Black Widows loved to habitat in them. Men would naturally sit and dangle and that's where they'd get the bite.

Back to my spider in a jar... She made a web nest that was akin to half of a sugar cone leaning against the side of the jar. Narrow on top and splayed out at the bottom. I'd toss in a hopper that would get stuck in the web and she'd go into action. She'd locate it and quickly immobilize it by biting it in one of the leg joints where it was most vulnerable. Her venom is a nerve agent.

Using her back legs while holding on to the web with the other six she would take one toe and touch her bottom where the spinnerets are located. She'd grab a thread end and pull it down and with the opposing leg she'd grab the other end - I'm not sure how it detached from her spinneret, but it now looked like a sticky 'rope'. She'd toss it on the hopper and quickly repeat the process many times until it was entangled quite well.

The grasshopper was still trying to escape so she'd bite it again and go back to tossing rope. Eventually, it was covered in sticky webbing. It was then she would hover over the hopper, touch it with her spinneret and spin the grasshopper as a thread would emit from her bottom. After a fashion the grasshopper was neatly wrapped up into a cocoon. She'd pull it 3/4 of the way up the nest and let it hang between the nest and the side of the jar. Every few hours she'd drop down from the apex and feed off the hanging meal.

Eventually, after she finished sucking the juices she'd cut the threads suspending the hopper and it would drop to the bottom of the jar. She was a very efficient killing machine. The bottom was littered with carcasses of dead bodies.

One night I got up to pee and decided to check on her. She was busy up top laying eggs in a 1/4" diameter half-moon of webbing. I watched as she finished her task and went to completing the egg sack. She then touched her spinneret to the ball over and over while spinning it as if to glue it all together. It was impervious to water and very tough to rip open. Eventually they hatched and I had hundreds of Black Widows (male and female) in the jar. I had to replace the cover with a cover that had smaller air holes as they were small enough to crawl out! There was cannibalism amongst siblings and I think mom also partook as I'd see shells of tiny spider remains from time to time.

She lasted through the winter and shriveled up like a raisin in the Sun as I had no bugs to feed her. I thought she had died. Come Spring I tossed a hopper in and she came alive and went after dinner! She recovered to live a few more months until I forgot that I Sevine'd the yard and tossed in a bug. The Sevin killed her.

I don't know how she fertilized the eggs. She must have mated at some point prior to my catching her in the house and stored the sperm in her Spermathecae.
Nice. Spiders can live a very long time without food sometimes. I read about someone catching some spiders and putting them in containers on a trip and forgot about them. Discovered them months later expecting to find dead spiders only to discover that every one of them was alive.


Cool pic. Reminds me of nice little fella I saw while working in Florida one day. A wolf spider. That leaf he is on is bigger than my hand. The pic does not do him justice.

View attachment 164158
Awesome. I have a lot of forest wolf spiders around my yard. They get pretty big. The larger ones always duck into my retaining wall before I can get a pic.
 

Unca Walt

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Herself just finished her tiger. It took her nearly two months. It looks so damn' real...

Tiger 10 cropped_edited-1.jpg


Here's two months ago:

Tiger.JPG


Watercolor, india ink <-- no fair makin' any mistakes...
 

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newmisty

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The house we are renovating as a stand of bamboo on its border. Shocked at the speed of growth we started to measure the new shoots coming out. The ones we measured are growing about 8-10 inches a day! Crazy stuff.

I was in all of this picture in person but when I put the crappy phone camera just couldn't capture to lighting that was there so it looks like nothing but if you were there was beautiful.

IMG_20200507_163200913.jpg
 

newmisty

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Bottom Feeder

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Bottom Feeder

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Ya know, I was just thinkin; I wonder if Walter's dad was in North Dakota in 1945.
<heh>
BF
 

GOLDBRIX

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Ya know, I was just thinkin; I wonder if Walter's dad was in North Dakota in 1945.
<heh>
BF
As I understand a lot of that was going around back then. I have a unique last name. Many similar but few exactly spelled the same.
As kids my dad took us to Yellowstone from Ohio one summer. While meandering thru the Dakotas dad saw a dentist's billboard with our last name on it. Of course he decided to look him up and found his office in this small town. Dad went in and wasn't in there 5 - 10 mins. We continued onto Yellowstone to Glacier Intl. and Canada before going back to Ohio.
About 20 years later me and my brothers were at reunion with dad and our step family. Talk about the Yellowstone trip came up and one of my step-sisters brought up the billboard with our name on it. Dad told the rest of the story.
His dad, my grandfather, spent his youth wandering from Missouri to the North Central states. Evidently grandpa found some work on a ranch and stayed for awhile. Left and came back to the Southeast then to Ohio. Grandpa left a "legacy" behind and the elders of that family did not appreciate the gift but left the daughter and baby boy the last name.
My dad and my aunt, the only two blood siblings, knew nothing of this earlier "Branch" of the family tree.
Dad got the Readers Digest Version at that stop in the Dakotas. No further contact was ever had with the Dakota family.

You look in enough closets you'll find a skeleton.
 

Unca Walt

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GOLDBRIX -- The differences in the spelling of your name are absolutely immaterial. Picture the 1790 Census:

Census-taker guy comes running up to the farmhouse (mebbe just ahead of the injuns or wolves), comes in and asks:

What is your family name? Over the roaring of the wind, somebody shouts: "Snedeker!". So the guy writes down one of the 110 different known spellings of my family name. Another census taker has the farm ten miles down the trail...

When this other guy asks... and he writes down a third ["official"] version -- even though the Snedekers were brothers.

But we cannot blame (if blame need be applied at all) only the census takers. In my family, a father had three sons. All three spelled their family name differently.

Phonetic is all that is needed. GOLDBRIX/COLDBRIX/Yada-Nada
 

newmisty

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newmisty

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Jam night.... perfect day here.

IMG_20200509_193859472_HDR.jpg
 

spinalcracker

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My vaccination

1/2 lemon
1/2 lime
1 can Spectacular Q Tonic Water
1 or 2 cups water
Rosa’s Grenadine sweeten according to taste

lots of options
add alcohol and psychedelics is high on the popularity charts according to Lawrence Welk.

637078E0-8A83-41C6-B7C7-C1DB4BB2444D.jpeg








the Q , it’s real and it’s Spectacular




D6EE443A-2D03-4C4C-9002-1C210C3EBDF6.jpeg



3902310D-9EB4-449C-B0AA-9702863F733A.png
 

EricTheCat

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One of my stained glass projects:
Very nice work! It would be cool to see what else you have made. A friend of mine's late father did a lot of stained glass work. I have always admired the skill, creativity and patience that stained glass work requires.

This is a crappy pic, but let's see if anyone can guess where this is from. Hint: Taken in Wisconsin
Dragon-2007-07-30-Img_2348S.jpg
 

Bottom Feeder

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Yeah, Eric, I would like to see some of my other work also. <heh> Stained glass was a hobby of my for about two years — still got all the equipment. I prolly made 20, 25 different projects but gave almost all of them away as gifts. Small windows, SG framed mirrors, small boxes, several animals, flowers, and other stuff I can't remember. It's been about forty years ago now.

That tiger will just barely fit in a 14X11 frame. It took me about two months to complete. I was going to put it in the foreground of a jungle background square frame. I never got back to finish it. Last time I checked glass prices I almost fainted. Geeze! Where did the $5.00 a sq ft glass go??

I'm gonna steal misty's bamboo shot and play around a little with that. Maybe I'll finish it this year. [hah]

BF

ps: is that a lampshade?
 

EricTheCat

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It is not a lampshade but I can see why you would ask from the pic. If I remember correctly, it was flat like a tabletop. That said, it was 13 years ago so I could be miss-remembering.

Edit: I found a better pic by searching online, flat it is like a table top.
 

Scorpio

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last evening at dusk, no pic, but had a small black bear come in,
crawled up the tree to raid the bird feeder,

after a couple of minutes he slid back down the tree and off down the hill he went,

wake up this am, the bird feeder has a hole in the side of it and the contents gone.

he must have gave it a bit of thought, I think I can, I think I can, and came back to raid it

little chit anyway
 

Unca Walt

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pitw

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Only snook I ever heard of was the one referred to as a loud mouth snook by foghorn leghorn.
 

Unca Walt

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Manatees: They are so tubby. We useta get a couple of heads of lettuce and go on down to the Ft. Liquordale power station outlet.

Even in the coldest winter, you would see tubbies and equator-style gaudy fish. Bread for the fishies and lettuce for the tubbies. It was fun.