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TAEZZAR

LADY JUSTICE ISNT BLIND, SHES JUST AFRAID TO WATCH
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TAEZZAR

LADY JUSTICE ISNT BLIND, SHES JUST AFRAID TO WATCH
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I took this with my iphone6 while drift fishing for Salmon. I enlarged it to just the point of acceptable grain, well almost acceptable.

1590521152135.png
 

TAEZZAR

LADY JUSTICE ISNT BLIND, SHES JUST AFRAID TO WATCH
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Very nice, nick, very nice ! :2 thumbs up::2 thumbs up::2 thumbs up::finished::thumbs up 2::thumbs up 2::thumbs up 2:
 

Uglytruth

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I took this with my iphone6 while drift fishing for Salmon. I enlarged it to just the point of acceptable grain, well almost acceptable.

View attachment 166585
Anyone getting good pics of Bald Eagles if you are against wind turbines needs to document the time, date, location (great if you can get something recognizable in the background) and get it to the anit windmill group in your area.
 

TAEZZAR

LADY JUSTICE ISNT BLIND, SHES JUST AFRAID TO WATCH
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Anyone getting good pics of Bald Eagles if you are against wind turbines needs to document the time, date, location (great if you can get something recognizable in the background) and get it to the anit windmill group in your area.
ALL the birds that I have owned, and it's a lot, and the bird's that I have observed in the wild, are way too smart to get hit by those slowly rotation blades. Birds are extremely aware of their environment.
I love bird's (actually I like all animals more than most people). But if a bird gets hit by one of those slowly rotating blade, maybe it's a demorat reincarnated & needed to die !
 

Uglytruth

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ALL the birds that I have owned, and it's a lot, and the bird's that I have observed in the wild, are way too smart to get hit by those slowly rotation blades. Birds are extremely aware of their environment.
I love bird's (actually I like all animals more than most people). But if a bird gets hit by one of those slowly rotating blade, maybe it's a demorat reincarnated & needed to die !
Figure out the blade tip speed. 15 rpm, 245 ft long blade, that's 490 ft diameter! Your going to be surprised, 5280 ft in a mile and it's a LOT of mph.
The circumference of a circle is found using this formula:

C= pi ⋅d or C= 2 pi x r


https://www.wind-watch.org/news/2020/05/02/bald-eagle-killed-by-wind-turbine-at-wood-county-site/
filed: May 2, 2020 • Ohio

Bald eagle killed by wind turbine at Wood County site
Credit: Matt Markey | The Blade | May 1, 2020 | www.toledoblade.com ~~

BOWLING GREEN – As they labored trying to start a broken down truck near the north end of the Wood County Landfill, Ken Vollmar, superintendent of the facility, and one of his employees felt the bite of the winter chill. Their cold hands had their attention as one of the four wind turbines located at the site spun nearby.
But then they heard a loud thump and turned to witness a large bird tumbling to the frozen ground. What they soon learned was the severed wing of the bird floated in its slower descent and landed about 50 feet away.
“We looked around as soon as we heard the turbine hit something, but at first we couldn’t tell exactly what it was,” Mr. Vollmar said. He immediately called his superiors downtown and then reported the incident to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources.
Reid Van Cleve, a veteran officer with the Division of Wildlife assigned to Ottawa County, who was also covering Wood County that January day, responded to the site in about an hour. The report he filed on the kill indicated the dead bird was an adult bald eagle, a species safeguarded under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.
“The wing was ripped off,” Officer Van Cleve said last week. “It was definitely a turbine strike.”
Following protocol with incidents involving federally protected species, he took the dead eagle to an evidence storage facility and contacted the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and one of their investigators picked up the carcass.
Amy Weller, who lives near the Bowling Green wind farm, said she had been concerned since the first two turbines went up in 2003 that their large blades would claim many birds, bats, hawks, or even bald eagles. Two more of the 1.8-megawatt turbines were added the following year. Bowling Green owns about a 50-percent share in the facility and the wind farm provides just 1.5 percent of the electrical needs for the city, according to Daryl Stockburger with the Bowling Green Utilities Department.
“I was opposed to those windmills from the start because of the impact they could have on wildlife,” Ms. Weller said. “I had been out to California about 20 years ago and saw the carcasses on the ground under the wind turbines. From an environmental standpoint, I can’t believe they would want to do that here, with all of the migration we have in this area and the bald eagles.”

The carcass of an adult bald eagle killed when it was struck by one of the wind turbines located at the Wood County Landfill lies on the ground near the base of the turbine.
ODNR
The situation at the landfill became more critical when a pair of adult bald eagles built a large nest in one of the tall trees just east of the site. John Hageman, a retired biologist who lives a few miles from the site and travels past the landfill area often, was likely the first to report that active bald eagle nest earlier this spring when he photographed two mature bald eagles on the rim of the nest. Out of concern over the safety of the eagles nesting so close to the turbines, Mr. Hageman called USFWS and ODNR and learned an eagle had been killed at the site back in January.
“The USFWS representative took the location information and mentioned that since there were so many nests in Ohio, they probably could operate [the turbines] as they pleased,” Mr. Hageman said.
Mr. Vollmar said he is not sure how long the nest has been there and that it “seemed to come out of nowhere.”
“We’ve been seeing bald eagles here and there for years, but that nest is huge, and they seemed to have built it pretty quickly,” he said. “The ODNR told us not to be driving close to it while they’re nesting, so we’ve stayed away.”
Elizabeth Wick lives on Green Road where her family’s property butts up against the landfill, and she recalled seeing a group of bald eagles – two adults and two eaglets – in a nearby field a couple of years ago, and she assumed at the time the birds were just passing through the area.
“I was really excited to hear that they were nesting here at the landfill. I just love seeing them,” she said. “I still whip out my cellphone every time and try to get a picture. It is just really cool to have them around.”

The wing of an adult bald eagle was severed when the bird was struck and killed by one of the wind turbines located at the Wood County Landfill.
ODNR
Besides their striking appearance – a deep, dark brown body that appears almost black, with a bright white head and tail – bald eagles also stand out for their size. Adults have a wingspan of about 6 1/2 feet, making them one of the largest raptors in North America.
More than three months after the bald eagle was killed at the landfill, the USFWS has released no pictures or written reports on the incident, and has given out very little basic information.
“Our investigation is currently ongoing,” said Tina Shaw, public affairs specialist with the USFWS office in Bloomington, Minn., where the case is being handled.
This past week, Holly Karg, the director of media relations and communications with American Municipal Power, Inc., which operates the wind turbines at the Bowling Green site, said AMP had not received a report of the eagle being killed by the turbine, so an investigation was started in response to The Blade’s inquiry.
“The investigation provided no evidence of the claim,” Ms. Karg later stated in a Thursday afternoon email.
The lack of information being disseminated about the incident does not surprise Mr. Hageman, who serves on the conservation committee for the Black Swamp Bird Observatory. What makes this incident so significant is it has provided a habeas corpus moment.
“We have these discussions all of the time about how the turbine operators are being so secretive about the number of bird and bat kills that take place at these sites. They are absolutely petrified about the general public knowing how many eagles and bats are killed by wind turbines,” he said.
A recent report by Audubon indicated wind turbines in North America kill up to 328,000 birds each year, “making it the most threatening form of green energy,” Audubon said. Many experts believe the actual death toll from wind turbines is much higher due to random sampling protocols and the proliferation of turbines across the landscape. The Audubon report also cited the rapid expansion of wind energy in the United States and added “the wind industry has the incentive to stop the slaughter” by giving serious consideration to the potential impact on birds and wildlife when determining where wind farms are developed.
“Especially with bald eagles, are we going to fight so hard to save something that was almost extinct, and then say it’s OK to kill them?” Mr. Hageman said, referencing the fact bald eagles, revered since they were designated as the national symbol of the United States in 1782, teetered on the verge of extirpation a few decades ago.
Bald eagle numbers were decimated during the middle of the 20th century by the loss of habitat, the use of pesticides that ruined the shells of their eggs, and illegal hunting.
By 1979, there were only four nesting pairs left in Ohio, and none of those nests were producing any young.
A ban on the use of DDT and better protection of the eagles and their habitat with the Endangered Species Act allowed the bald eagle to start a steady recovery. By 2007, bald eagle numbers had recovered to the point that the USFWS removed them from the endangered species list. A recent survey by the ODNR indicated there are 707 bald eagle nests in the state and bald eagles are nesting in 85 of Ohio’s 88 counties.
Bald eagles have been a dominant factor in the debate over a half dozen proposed massive wind farms in Seneca, Huron, Erie, Sandusky, and Crawford counties. The Republic Wind, Seneca Wind, Emerson Creek Wind, Honey Creek Wind, Buck Springs Wind, and Emerson West Wind projects could add hundreds of wind turbines to a part of Ohio that is used by many migratory birds, and is now home to many bald eagle nests.
Chris Aichholz is an activist with Seneca Anti-Wind Union, a grassroots group that has been battling with the large power brokers seeking to add these new wind farms across northwest Ohio’s agricultural midsection, and in the middle of what has become very active bald eagle nesting grounds. An ODNR study earlier this spring revealed Seneca County ranks fifth in Ohio with at least 24 active bald eagle nests.
Mr. Aichholz, who lives in rural Seneca County, said he now regularly sees adult bald eagles soaring and hunting across the farm fields and woodlots near his home. His concern for the fate of the bald eagles spiked when he learned that the Seneca Wind project, now in a state of limbo, would have included 27 wind turbines twice the height of those at the Bowling Green wind farm within two miles of his home.
“What happened with the turbine blade killing that bald eagle over in Wood County – that just confirmed our worst fears,” he said. “That dead eagle is the reality of this issue, and it shows that this can happen right here in our backyard. It is awful, and you just hope you can find someone who is interested on the federal level and get them to take some kind of action.”
Mark Shieldcastle, a retired avian biologist from the ODNR who is widely recognized as the region’s preeminent expert on birds and bald eagles, said the flying and hunting patterns of bald eagles put them in a very precarious position when wind turbines sprout in their habitat.
“They do a lot of crepuscular movement, before dawn and after dark, and that would make it very difficult for them to see things such as the moving blades of a wind turbine,” he said. “I’m sure these wind companies don’t want to get the word out that a turbine killed an eagle, but these turbines might be directly between their feeding area and the nest, so I could see their style of flight being very problematic.”
Mr. Hageman, who retired in 2011 after a quarter of a century working for Ohio Sea Grant and Ohio State University’s Stone Laboratory, said any new wind projects should be heavily scrutinized for their potentially devastating impact on birds, bats, bald eagles, and hawks, while existing facilities such as the Bowling Green wind complex should modify the use of the turbines to give the resident bald eagles a chance to survive.
“I would like to see them turn the darned things off at least through the early part of the year when they are raising young and teaching them to fly,” he said. “That seems like a small sacrifice to keep these birds alive. Bald eagles are the most valuable player in the bird world, but I get the impression that some people look at them as expendable these days, since we have more around.”
 

Uglytruth

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To figure out the blade tip speed. 15 rpm, 245 ft long blade, that's 490 ft diameter! Your going to be surprised, 5280 ft in a mile and it's a LOT of mph.
The circumference of a circle is found using this formula:

C= pi ⋅d

C = 3.1415 x 490'
C = 1539'
1539' x 15 rpm = 23090 ft per minute x 60 minutes = 1385400 ft / 5280 = 262.38 mph !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Yea it's only going 15 rpm......

Not to mention they create infrasound.
Infrasound, sometimes referred to as low-frequency sound, describes sound waves with a frequency below the lower limit of audibility (generally 20 Hz). Hearing becomes gradually less sensitive as frequency decreases, so for humans to perceive infrasound, the sound pressure must be sufficiently high. The ear is the primary organ for sensing infrasound, but at higher intensities it is possible to feel infrasound vibrations in various parts of the body.
The study of such sound waves is sometimes referred to as infrasonics, covering sounds beneath 20 Hz down to 0.1 Hz. and rarely to 0.001 Hz. People use this frequency range for monitoring earthquakes and volcanoes, charting rock and petroleum formations below the earth, and also in ballistocardiography and seismocardiography to study the mechanics of the heart.
Infrasound is characterized by an ability to get around obstacles with little dissipation. In music, acoustic waveguide methods, such as a large pipe organ or, for reproduction, exotic loudspeaker designs such as transmission line, rotary woofer, or traditional subwoofer designs can produce low-frequency sounds, including near-infrasound. Subwoofers designed to produce infrasound are capable of sound reproduction an octave or more below that of most commercially available subwoofers, and are often about 10 times the size.[citation needed]


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Drastic loss of bird population deeply troubling

As you drive across the Midwest and over the flat, southern deserts, you will see huge wind farms stretching farther than the eyes can see. Builders want to put wind farms on major bird migration routes, such as here along the Great Lakes. Increasing thousands of giant windmills with blades spinning hundreds of miles per hour destroy a great number of birds, as well as bats. It was estimated that in 2012, wind turbines destroyed 573,000 birds. The number of wind turbines has increased considerably since that time. Have we forgotten about the fuss over wind turbines killing bald eagles, one of our national symbols?

Credit: Mike Bleech: Drastic loss of bird population deeply troubling | By Mike Bleech, Contributing writer | Erie Times-News | Oct 6, 2019 | www.goerie.com ~~

The U.S. and Canada have lost about a quarter of their birds since 1970, according to a study reported in the journal Science. This is a loss of about 3 billion wild breeding birds that live in most habitats.
The drastic loss is connected with global losses of insects, amphibians and other wildlife.
Seven institutions were involved in the study that looked at 529 breeding bird species in the U.S. and Canada.
Losses of regional birds hit us hardest. Few people may have noticed that we have been seeing fewer indigo bunting, scarlet tanager, ovenbird or rufus-sided towhee. They live in heavy cover and never have been very numerous. But when we look at typical backyard birds like dark-eyed junco, whose population slipped back 175 million individuals, or the white-throated sparrow, which declined by 93 million individual birds, this hits home.
About 90 percent of nearly 3 billion birds lost belong to just 12 bird families.
Findings included 48 years of data from several independent sources including the Christmas Bird Count and the North American Breeding Bird Survey.
Some habitats are apparently more vulnerable than others. A billion birds have disappeared from forests since 1970. Grassland birds have declined by 720 million. Birds that hunt insects on the wing dropped 169 million. Even as a breeding pair of plover returned to breed at Presque Isle this spring, coastal shorebirds have lost a third of their population.
Radar in night skies reveals a 14 percent decline in northbound migrants in just the past decade.
This study did not look into the causes of bird declines. Scientists have identified the loss of habitat as the greatest threat to birds. There are degrees of habitat loss. In many cases, the habitat degrades so it can support fewer birds. In the cases of human development, habitat just disappears from existence.
How many of us have developed parts of our lawns because it makes it prettier to us, even though it devalues bird habitat?
Invasive plants that displace native plants can eliminate food sources. Often the invader that replaces a native plant is not suitable for American birds.
Climate change drives down bird populations. Shifts in the timing of food supplies can be critical to migrating birds.
And how big is this? As you drive across the Midwest and over the flat, southern deserts, you will see huge wind farms stretching farther than the eyes can see. Builders want to put wind farms on major bird migration routes, such as here along the Great Lakes. Increasing thousands of giant windmills with blades spinning hundreds of miles per hour destroy a great number of birds, as well as bats.
It was estimated that in 2012, wind turbines destroyed 573,000 birds. The number of wind turbines has increased considerably since that time. Have we forgotten about the fuss over wind turbines killing bald eagles, one of our national symbols?
Audubon has 58,000 of the large wind turbines in its database. Since 2005, the number has been increasing by about 3,000 wind turbines per year. Audubon estimates that wind turbines kill 140,000 to 328,000 birds each year in North America.
USA Today estimated that 6.8 million birds are killed by collisions with cell towers and radio towers. Still more collide with power lines.
And here is a set of numbers neither bird lovers nor cat lovers should tolerate. Cats account for 1.4 billion to 3.7 billion wild bird deaths.
So is there any mystery why North American bird numbers are declining rapidly?
There are things we can do to help remedy this sorry situation. First, contact and join bird enthusiast groups including American Bird Conservancy, Audubon Society and Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology. These groups and many universities can guide the development of bird-friendly lawns and larger properties.
Fossil fuel is not the villain it is often made out to be. We have developed ways to make emissions less toxic. Doubtless more improvements might be made. My wife’s car has near-zero-emissions. This might not save the world, but it is a big step in the right direction.
 

newmisty

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Just came across this old pic on my hard drive...

GIM2TP.JPG
 

Goldhedge

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I heard the tips of those wind generators moved at 300mph... 265 is near that...
 

Uglytruth

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I heard the tips of those wind generators moved at 300mph... 265 is near that...
Study Infrasound. Creates all sorts of problems. Drives animals away. Affects people depending on the construction of their house. Never ending noise. Makes picture windows pulse. They want the right to put then so close to the property lines if it falls it will be in your property. Can chuck ice 1800 ft. Produce half as much electric on year 15 as it does it's first year. Flashing lights. Affects crop dusting and life flight paths. and on and on
 

newmisty

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newmisty

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Upon closer examination the softness of the lower left hand bear is in Stark contrast with the more detailed right hand bear, both in detail and body language, to which the eye naturally follows the angle of the tree which book end the large central figure with the most impactful expression ..great contrast and balance.
 

newmisty

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We bought a few splash cymbals and a popcorn snare for the jam kit to help fill in some sonic voids. It's really opened up my improvisation.

IMG_20200523_231200510.jpg
 

newmisty

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Another blast from the past!

GIM6 (1).jpg
 

EricTheCat

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We bought a few splash cymbals and a popcorn snare for the jam kit to help fill in some sonic voids. It's really opened up my improvisation.

View attachment 167608
That's a heck of a setup. My 5 piece has a bit of dust on it. I really should knock the dust off of it one of these days.
 

newmisty

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That's a heck of a setup. My 5 piece has a bit of dust on it. I really should knock the dust off of it one of these days.
Yeah, it's a 5 piece with an added timbale and popcorn/firecracker snare. Looking to add a couple small bongos/toms left of the HH soon. Drums need to be beaten to feel loved. :p

Check out the 2:30 mark for where I'm looking to go with it....BTW REALLY getting into the band LETTUCE lately (That's his band).

 

EricTheCat

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Yeah, it's a 5 piece with an added timbale and popcorn/firecracker snare. Looking to add a couple small bongos/toms left of the HH soon. Drums need to be beaten to feel loved. :p

Check out the 2:30 mark for where I'm looking to go with it....BTW REALLY getting into the band LETTUCE lately (That's his band).

Nice. He's tight. I do have a pair of bongos I could set up next to my kit. :) For symbols I have a crash, crash ride and high hat.
 

newmisty

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Nice. He's tight. I do have a pair of bongos I could set up next to my kit. :) For symbols I have a crash, crash ride and high hat.
Plenty to rock with!
 

newmisty

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Brother, I can rock with a stick and a log. :)
One time in a rush to get to band rehearsal I left without my bass drum. We ended up micing up a cardboard box I cobbled together from my truck... It honestly didn't sound that bad. Another time I was playing a gig and in the middle of a song my bass drum beater broke through the bass drum head. We took a quick break and I patched it up with duct tape and finished the rest of the gig fine.

And more to your point, I even did a small rehearsal out of state with a couple bandmates and ended up playing on an unplugged, kids, plastic, electric drumset. It's all about the heart.
 
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newmisty

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I would love to have just 1 if anyone wanted to part with one...... please PM me.
What others were made?
That's just one of several designs that was submitted for a vote but never minted.
 

newmisty

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Quick drawing I did recently.

IMG_20200528_200251434.jpg
 
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Uglytruth

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That's just one of several designs that was submitted for a vote but never minted.
Are there pictures here of the coins you did have made? How many different ones were there? How many did you have to buy to have them made?
 

newmisty

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Are there pictures here of the coins you did have made? How many different ones were there? How many did you have to buy to have them made?
That was before my time as it was those very rounds minted(Minuteman version I believe, or the bull- bought through APMEX in an order of generic silver) that gave me the website gold is money. Info, which is how I found GIM1.
 

EricTheCat

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That was before my time as it was those very rounds minted(Minuteman version I believe, or the bull- bought through APMEX in an order of generic silver) that gave me the website gold is money. Info, which is how I found GIM1.
That's gotta be the coolest story ever for how anyone found the original GIM. :)
 

newmisty

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That's gotta be the coolest story ever for how anyone found the original GIM. :)
Yeah, I'm looking at this meet silver round notice it has a website address on it circling around the edge. Highlights gold and was thirsty for info so I checked it out. Lo and behold Mienfoo there was Far deeper then gold and right on my wavelength. The fact that was almost 15 years ago blows my freaking mind everyday.
 

EricTheCat

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Yeah, I'm looking at this meet silver round notice it has a website address on it circling around the edge. Highlights gold and was thirsty for info so I checked it out. Lo and behold Mienfoo there was Far deeper then gold and right on my wavelength. The fact that was almost 15 years ago blows my freaking mind everyday.
I want to say it was about 2006 when I came across the old goldismoney.info, was looking for a forum about PMs. Finding the community was a pleasant surprise. Seemed like I found a place where everyone read my mind. Hardly had any reason to comment back then because so often my thoughts were already represented. :)
 

newmisty

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I just saw a cool Cardinal outside my window. Watched him for a few minutes up close.. he had baby blue on his back... very interesting. After several minutes I decided to get my phone and try to get a pic and of course he left as soon as I turned around.