• "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

The new Random Pictures Thread:

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica
My dad had one of those early 60's industrial version sawzall ... heavy metal case, came in a hinged box... When he brought it home from work, I knew it was going to be fun! That and his similar real 1" drill with two pipes threaded into in addition to the D handle...

My job when he was drilling or sawing big angle or pipe was to man the cord, watch if the bit stuck and quickly unplug it. Of course inevitably once on our dune buggy project the drill stuck, I was slow and that blasted drill spun my 240# dad around in a circle... To which he simply said if you're gonna be the cord man you have to be smarter than the damn cord!
 

Silver

Platinum Bling
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,259
Likes
12,306
What are some of the uses? I can't recall hearing of anything made from Sycamore come to think of it.
In distantly related news the street I grew up on was Sycamore drive.
Sycamore lumber, especially quarter sawn, produces beautiful figure and its a hard wood. It rots on the ground quick though.

figure.jpeg
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica
well Chris since you're the only participant you win first second and third place. Your prize is a feeling of pride and the confidence knowing you're not afraid to step up to the plate.

Those are meant to be the proper method of holding scaffolding on uneven ground. They slide up into the bottom and by screwing around screwing the giant wing nut it raises and lowers that leg.

Naturally I temporarily misplaced the bottom feet and so I resorted to using a slightly more mmm...backwoods approach. Osha compliant of course.
Screenshot_20200822-112111.png


Screenshot_20200822-112020.png
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica

specsaregood

Silver Member
Silver Miner
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
1,224
Likes
1,531
What are some of the uses? I can't recall hearing of anything made from Sycamore come to think of it.
In distantly related news the street I grew up on was Sycamore drive.
My research into the subject found they have historically been used for butcher blocks because while the wood is not strong, it is nigh impossible to split.

I'm thinking some endtables down the line. here is a pic I found on ebay of a slab of it:
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica
I think that is an Eastern Black Swallowtail. It's been a great year for butterflies.

Found this monarch caterpillar yesterday on one of my milkweed plants.
View attachment 177675
Thanks for the ID. Those caterpillars have voracious appetites eh'?
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica
My research into the subject found they have historically been used for butcher blocks because while the wood is not strong, it is nigh impossible to split.

I'm thinking some endtables down the line. here is a pic I found on ebay of a slab of it:
Thanks for that Spex.
 

Silver

Platinum Bling
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,259
Likes
12,306
Here is some left over sycamore scrap I had laying around. It's plain sawn, but you can see how if it is cut right, you get the figure:

sycamore.jpg
sycamore1.jpg
 

Silver

Platinum Bling
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,259
Likes
12,306
My research into the subject found they have historically been used for butcher blocks because while the wood is not strong, it is nigh impossible to split.

I'm thinking some endtables down the line. here is a pic I found on ebay of a slab of it:
You can see the spalting in this board, it was either on the ground or standing dead before it was sawn.
 

Silver

Platinum Bling
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,259
Likes
12,306
well Chris since you're the only participant you win first second and third place. Your prize is a feeling of pride and the confidence knowing you're not afraid to step up to the plate.

Those are meant to be the proper method of holding scaffolding on uneven ground. They slide up into the bottom and by screwing around screwing the giant wing nut it raises and lowers that leg.

Naturally I temporarily misplaced the bottom feet and so I resorted to using a slightly more mmm...backwoods approach. Osha compliant of course. View attachment 177789

View attachment 177788
That is a fine garden shed, looks like a fun project, especially if you are going to keep the same roof design.

edit to add: a standing seam metal roof would be primo on this project.
 
Last edited:

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica
That is a fine garden shed, looks like a fun project, especially if you are going to keep the same roof design.

edit to add: a standing seam metal roof would be primo on this project.
Thanks Silver, it is quite fun and enjoyable. The environment is very peaceful, comfortable and serene.
Re the roof,upon initial inspection I told them part of their problem with the rot was the slope of the roof and using asphalt shingles. They understood and she looked for different designs and ended up coming right back to keeping this one. They said it lasted 20 years and if they can have the new one last about that long they're happy. I was shocked when she told me they had been married for 52 years! They both look great for their age.
I'm going to recommend we put down a complete covering of ice and water shield before shingling. Trouble is finding Grace Ice & Water Shield which is the shiznit. The alternative around here is a joke. Back East I used to get 3 ft rolls for just over a hundred bucks and down here they at one time had half size rolls of Grace and I don't remember the cost, but not sure it's carried by anyone around here. They dont build things as skookum down here as up there.


This seems like a good time to mention something. So somebody's brother-in-law, I don't remember the details, owned a Sawmill and milled the rough sawn lumber for the shed. The whole time they kept saying it's rough sawn Cedar, rough sawn Cedar... Well 95% of it is Oak. With the structure being rough sawn Oak coupled with the physics of that particular roof design netted some extremely impressive results. The size of the oak tree that fell square on that top roof peak should have crushed that shed into toothpicks but it barely wounded it! I climbed up on the workbench so that I was about shoulder height to the part of the upper roof damage that is now broken inward. I got under it crouching down a little putting my shoulder under it pushing but everything I had. It did nothing. Having tried to pry a couple of items apart from one another, I knew what we were looking at back when my mom first moved into her last time there was a giant pile of rough sawn Oak starting to rot away on the side of the property so I drug it up to a clearing about a hundred yards up the hill belt between two with rough sawn Oak and 20 penny nails. It's essentially a cellulose based steel. So yeah, after the nails are sitting in that wood a while it's nearly welded together.

Ive put in a request for pictures of the tree on the roof
 

Goldhedge

Moderator
Site Mgr
Sr Site Supporter
GIM Hall Of Fame
Joined
Mar 28, 2010
Messages
52,852
Likes
99,935
Location
Rocky Mountains
I wonder how sycamore would fair as guitar wood?

How is it cut to expose the grain best? Quarter sawn?
 

Silver

Platinum Bling
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,259
Likes
12,306
Thanks Silver, it is quite fun and enjoyable. The environment is very peaceful, comfortable and serene.
Re the roof,upon initial inspection I told them part of their problem with the rot was the slope of the roof and using asphalt shingles. They understood and she looked for different designs and ended up coming right back to keeping this one. They said it lasted 20 years and if they can have the new one last about that long they're happy. I was shocked when she told me they had been married for 52 years! They both look great for their age.
I'm going to recommend we put down a complete covering of ice and water shield before shingling. Trouble is finding Grace Ice & Water Shield which is the shiznit. The alternative around here is a joke. Back East I used to get 3 ft rolls for just over a hundred bucks and down here they at one time had half size rolls of Grace and I don't remember the cost, but not sure it's carried by anyone around here. They dont build things as skookum down here as up there.


This seems like a good time to mention something. So somebody's brother-in-law, I don't remember the details, owned a Sawmill and milled the rough sawn lumber for the shed. The whole time they kept saying it's rough sawn Cedar, rough sawn Cedar... Well 95% of it is Oak. With the structure being rough sawn Oak coupled with the physics of that particular roof design netted some extremely impressive results. The size of the oak tree that fell square on that top roof peak should have crushed that shed into toothpicks but it barely wounded it! I climbed up on the workbench so that I was about shoulder height to the part of the upper roof damage that is now broken inward. I got under it crouching down a little putting my shoulder under it pushing but everything I had. It did nothing. Having tried to pry a couple of items apart from one another, I knew what we were looking at back when my mom first moved into her last time there was a giant pile of rough sawn Oak starting to rot away on the side of the property so I drug it up to a clearing about a hundred yards up the hill belt between two with rough sawn Oak and 20 penny nails. It's essentially a cellulose based steel. So yeah, after the nails are sitting in that wood a while it's nearly welded together.

Ive put in a request for pictures of the tree on the roof
The pic you took from the inside looking up at the hole in roof made me think it was much older because of the rough sawn lumber - that explains it.

ABC roofing supply is where I get my non metal roofing supplies - looks like they have a couple of outlets in Ark.

https://www.abcsupply.com/products/roofing-accessories/ice-water-shield
 
Last edited:

Silver

Platinum Bling
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,259
Likes
12,306

Uncle

Midas Member
Midas Member
Midas Supporter
GIM Hall Of Fame
Joined
Apr 13, 2010
Messages
2,295
Likes
3,009
Location
SA
I wonder how sycamore would fair as guitar wood?

How is it cut to expose the grain best? Quarter sawn?
Search for "sycamore guitar". Lots of hits. Will check again when I'm on a PC.

Golden Regards
Uncle
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica
The pic you took from the inside looking up at the hole in roof made me think it was much older because of the rough sawn lumber - that explains it.

ABC roofing supply is where I get my non metal roofing supplies - looks like they have a couple of outlets in Ark.

https://www.abcsupply.com/products/roofing-accessories/ice-water-shield
Yeah, looks just like many 100+ houses I've worked on.

That just reminded me, she told me about some marine-grade plywood that she had stained and I said, "marine grade, wow really?"

She says, "yeah and it was really cheap."

Now I'm like
and a ouple minutes later as we were walking around she says, "oh here's a piece." And holds up a chunk of 1/4 Luan. I had to burst her bubble on that one.
 

Silver

Platinum Bling
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,259
Likes
12,306
Yeah, looks just like many 100+ houses I've worked on.

That just reminded me, she told me about some marine-grade plywood that she had stained and I said, "marine grade, wow really?"

She says, "yeah and it was really cheap."

Now I'm like
and a ouple minutes later as we were walking around she says, "oh here's a piece." And holds up a chunk of 1/4 Luan. I had to burst her bubble on that one.
I can't stand the smell of luan, on top of it being the lowest grade of plywood.
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica

Silver

Platinum Bling
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,259
Likes
12,306

Goldhedge

Moderator
Site Mgr
Sr Site Supporter
GIM Hall Of Fame
Joined
Mar 28, 2010
Messages
52,852
Likes
99,935
Location
Rocky Mountains
any one have some 1/4 sawn sycamore?
 

Silver

Platinum Bling
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,259
Likes
12,306
any one have some 1/4 sawn sycamore?
If I remember correctly, CS has sycamore trees. A local sawmill mill might have some or somebody with a wood- mizer. Run a wanted ad on craigslist.
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica
My guess is the oak was green when they built the garden shed - aged, you would have to pre-drill to get a nail in it - also by the gaps in the sheathing. That's why you have board and batten - green wood method.
Yeah i noticed the rafter to plate joints are ..mmm... of rustic quality.
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica
Well I inadvertently started a frog farm.
I've saved many a tadpole life as when I water the garden, inevitably some didn't get the memo and find their way into the water bucket so as i water the plants I make sure to keep them in there with a splash of water tell me about them how lucky they are they didn't become tomato food and throw them back in their nursery. I just spent too much energy trying to get good pictures of them but it was fun to watch him for a little while because they're quite playful and rambunctious. they were kind of acting like a bunch of mellow dogs kind of nipping at each other and then going back to lounging. Was even taking a picture of one as he went up for air and that was pretty neat.

IMG_20200822_165807109.jpg


IMG_20200822_174943769_BURST000_COVER_TOP.jpg


IMG_20200822_165906594.jpg


Screenshot_20200822-175838.png
 

Attachments

Last edited:

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica
Started a new job today. Captured a pic of our first mascot. And no, I'm not working on Mars.

View attachment 177376
Being from New England I'm still learning the species around here in the Ozarks. I think we have a successful ID on that guy as a juvenile 5 liined skink:


The (American) five-lined skink (Plestiodon fasciatus) is a species of lizard in the familyScincidae. The species is endemic to North America. It is one of the most common lizards in the eastern U.S. and one of the seven native species of lizards in Canada.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plestiodon_fasciatus
 

EricTheCat

An ant on a hill.
Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
GIM Hall Of Fame
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
2,150
Likes
5,533
Location
Southern MN
Well I inadvertently started a frog farm.
I've saved many a tadpole life as when I water the garden, inevitably some didn't get the memo and find their way into the water bucket so as i water the plants I make sure to keep them in there with a splash of water tell me about them how lucky they are they didn't become tomato food and throw them back in their nursery. I just spent too much energy trying to get good pictures of them but it was fun to watch him for a little while because they're quite playful and rambunctious. they were kind of acting like a bunch of mellow dogs kind of nipping at each other and then going back to lounging. Was even taking a picture of one as he went up for air and that was pretty neat.

View attachment 177826

View attachment 177824

View attachment 177823

View attachment 177822
Those are awesome. We caught tadpoles when I was a kid and kept them in a fish tank outside. To our surprise, instead of turning into frogs they turned into little toads. The little toads would eat crickets that were nearly their own size. Toads love box elder bugs and worms.
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica
Those are awesome. We caught tadpoles when I was a kid and kept them in a fish tank outside. To our surprise, instead of turning into frogs they turned into little toads. The little toads would eat crickets that were nearly their own size. Toads love box elder bugs and worms.
Yeah, I'm not sure what they are but I do know their parents are so loud that I had to throw water in the foliage to quiet them down whale watching the local fireworks display from the backyard.
 

mtnman

Platinum Bling
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
4,730
Likes
9,415
Location
East Tennessee
Being from New England I'm still learning the species around here in the Ozarks. I think we have a successful ID on that guy as a juvenile 5 liined skink:


The (American) five-lined skink (Plestiodon fasciatus) is a species of lizard in the familyScincidae. The species is endemic to North America. It is one of the most common lizards in the eastern U.S. and one of the seven native species of lizards in Canada.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plestiodon_fasciatus
Those are everywhere around my place. I've got old ones out front that have been around for years, babies every spring. All my life I've known them as Blue Tailed Skinks. The tails are fragile, bump them too hard and they fall off and wiggle, giving the lizard time to escape a predator. They grow back in a couple of months.
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica
Those are everywhere around my place. I've got old ones out front that have been around for years, babies every spring. All my life I've known them as Blue Tailed Skinks. The tails are fragile, bump them too hard and they fall off and wiggle, giving the lizard time to escape a predator. They grow back in a couple of months.
I think your name makes a lot more sense. a regular member hearing something similar to that about tails but not so specific. Crazy stuff
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica
"FORE!"

THWACK!"

IMG_20200823_103028604~2.jpg
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
31,801
Likes
49,605
Location
Qmerica