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The Ocean Floor Is Sinking Under The Water Weight From Melting Glaciers, And It’s As Bad As It Sound

JayDubya

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#1
The Ocean Floor Is Sinking Under The Water Weight From Melting Glaciers, And It’s As Bad As It Sounds

Where do they come up with this shyt? Ice is less dense than water but it doesn't weigh any less. If you freeze a 16 ounce bottle of water, it still weighs exactly 16 ounces. The molecules will spread and it will become less dense and take up more space, that's why the bottle swells, but it still weighs exactly the same. So conversely, when ice melts it does NOT become any heavier, it stays the exact same weight.

http://www.newsweek.com/climate-cha...tm_campaign=rss&utm_content=/rss/yahoous/news

So much extra water is being added into the world’s oceans from melting glaciers that the ocean floor is sinking underneath its increasing weight. This ocean floor deformation also means we have miscalculated just how much ocean levels are rising and the problem could be far worse than previously believed.

Over the past 20 years, ocean basins have sunk an average of 0.004 inches per year. This means that the ocean is 0.08 inches deeper than it was two decades ago. While this small fragment of an inch may not seem much, oceans cover 70 percent of our planet, making the problem bigger than it seems at an initial glance.

In a study published online in Geophysical Research Levels, researchers explain how they used a mathematical equation known as the elastic sea level equation to more accurately measure the ocean floor. This allowed them to see how much the bottom of the ocean floor has changed from 1993 to 2014. While they are not the first scientists to look at the ocean floor, this is the first time that researchers have taken into account how additional water from melted ice may have further stretched the ocean floor, LiveScience reported.

The results show that the ocean is changing in ways that we previously did not realize and is sinking further into the earth’s crust. As a result, scientists have underestimated how much sea levels are rising by as much as 8 percent. The study concludes by emphasizing that future sea level measurement should take ocean floor deformation into account in order to more accurately understand how our oceans are changing.

All the water on the planet today is all the water that has ever existed on the planet, but not all water is in its liquid form. Recently, rising temperatures have caused much of the frozen water on the planet’s glaciers to melt and join the ocean as liquid. This mass melting ice rising sea levels, a problem whose consequences we’re already starting to see. The first to notice the repercussions of rising sea levels are those who live in coastal areas. Rising waters mean less land to live on. In addition, more water in the ocean means that ocean storms, such as hurricanes, have the potential to be stronger and more devastating, National Geographic reported.

Small coastal areas won’t be the only ones to disappear due to rising waters and if current estimates are correct, by 2100 the ocean will rise between 11 and 38 inches, a number that could mean that much of the U.S. east coast will be covered in water, National Geographic reported.
 

Irons

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#2
Global warming is a bizarre, ever shifting religion. I wonder if they have a weekly newsletter to keep the faithful up to speed?
Pretty creepy.

.
 

Irons

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#3
This ocean floor deformation also means we have miscalculated just how much ocean levels are rising and the problem could be far worse than previously believed.

.
Boom! Florida ain't under water like we said it was going to be, so the gadt damn ocean floor is sinking!!
It would be funny if it wasn't so freaking pathetic.

Oh and BTW, the Great Lakes ain't drying up either.

.fuckery
 

Ensoniq

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#6
When it sinks to the other side, China will have all our water
 

smooth

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Certainly the added weight on the ocean floor equates to an increase of pressure in the earths core. I expect Old Faithful will have the big one any moment as well...resulting in even more green house gasses . Fuckin global warming is scary shit.
 
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<SLV>

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#8
The Ocean Floor Is Sinking Under The Water Weight From Melting Glaciers, And It’s As Bad As It Sounds

Where do they come up with this shyt? Ice is less dense than water but it doesn't weigh any less. If you freeze a 16 ounce bottle of water, it still weighs exactly 16 ounces. The molecules will spread and it will become less dense and take up more space, that's why the bottle swells, but it still weighs exactly the same. So conversely, when ice melts it does NOT become any heavier, it stays the exact same weight.


Fluid ounces are a measurement of volume. Weight ounces are an entirely different.

Isn't this good news for Al Gore... and everyone living on the coastline?
 

GOLDBRIX

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#10
Is the ocean floor sinking or the continents and islands RISING ? :ponder:

Inquiring minds want to know. :gracious:
 

ZZZZZ

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#11
There are roughly 325 million cubic kilometers of water in the Atlantic Ocean.
http://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=3472

A cubic kilometer of seawater weighs about 1.1 billion tons
http://www.answers.com/Q/How_much_does_a_cubic_kilometer_of_water_weigh

So 325 million cubic kilometers of water weighs.... a lot. (Somebody else do the math, it's too late at night for my brain to do this higher math.)

The point is a few billion tons of glacial water is, pardon the analogy, just a drop in the oceanic bucket.
.
.
 

gnome

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#12
Where do they come up with this shyt? Ice is less dense than water but it doesn't weigh any less. If you freeze a 16 ounce bottle of water, it still weighs exactly 16 ounces. The molecules will spread and it will become less dense and take up more space, that's why the bottle swells, but it still weighs exactly the same. So conversely, when ice melts it does NOT become any heavier, it stays the exact same weight.
Glaciers are on land, not on the sea. It isn't that the water gets any heavier, it's that there are trillions of tons of mass shifting from land to oceans. Greenland alone lost 1 trillion tons of ice in 4 years.
 

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#13
Where is the Earth's crust the thickest?
It is made up of The inside of the Earth has four different layers. loose material, like rocks, soil, and seabed. The crust is about five miles deep beneath the oceans and about twenty-five miles thick below the continents. Beyond the crust is the mantle.

------------

There are 3 main layers of the earth and the thickness of each increases as we move inward.

Explanation:
The outermost layer is the crust, which is divided into oceanic crust and continental crust. The crust is thinner under the oceans (6-11 km thick), while continental crust is about 25-90 km thick. We can take the average thickness of the crust as 40 km.

Below the crust lies the mantle, which is divided into upper, middle and lower (inner) mantle. The mantle is about 2,660 km thick, with the upper mantle being 110 km thick, the middle mantle 500 km thick and lower mantle 2,050 km thick

Below the mantle lies the core, which is divided into outer and inner core. The core is about 3,488 km thick, with the outer core being 2,260 km thick and the inner core 1,228 km thick.

Between the lower mantle and the outer core lies a region known as Gutenberg Discontinuity, which is 190 km thick.

 

Scorpio

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#14
below it states:
Meanwhile, the oceanic crust reacts with seawater and carries some of it down into the mantle.



All About the Earth's Crust

Cross section of Earth showing the crust, upper mantle, lower mantle, outer core and inner core. Leonello Calvetti/Stocktrek Images / Getty Images
by Andrew Alden
Updated April 02, 2017
The Earth's crust is an extremely thin layer of rock that makes up the outermost solid shell of our planet. In relative terms, it's thickness is like that of the skin of an apple. It amounts to less than half of 1 percent of the planet's total mass but plays a vital role in most of Earth's natural cycles.

The crust can be thicker than 80 kilometers in some spots and less than one kilometer thick in others.


Underneath it lies the mantle, a layer of silicate rock approximately 2700 kilometers thick. The mantle accounts for the bulk of the Earth.

The crust is composed of many different types of rocks that fall within three main categories: igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary. However, most of those rocks originated as either granite or basalt. The mantle beneath is made of peridotite. Bridgmanite, the most common mineral on Earth, is found in the deep mantle.

How We Know the Earth Has a Crust
We didn't know the Earth had a crust until the early 1900s. Up until then, all we knew was that our planet wobbles in relation to the sky as if it had a large, dense core - astronomical observations told us so. Then along came seismology, which brought us a new type of evidence from below: seismic velocity.

Seismic velocity measures the speed at which earthquake waves propagate through the different materials (i.e. rocks) below the surface.


With a few important exceptions, seismic velocity within the Earth tends to increase with depth.

In 1909, a paper by the seismologist Andrija Mohorovicic established a sudden change in seismic velocity - a discontinuity of some sort - about 50 kilometers deep in the Earth. Seismic waves bounce off it (reflect) and bend (refract) as they go through it, the same way that light behaves at the discontinuity between water and air.


That discontinuity, named the Mohorovicic discontinuity or "Moho," is the accepted boundary between the crust and mantle.

Crusts and Plates
The crust and tectonic plates are not the same thing. Plates are thicker than the crust and consist of the crust plus the shallow mantle just beneath it. This stiff and brittle two-layered combination is called the lithosphere ("stony layer" in scientific Latin). The lithospheric plates lie on a layer of softer, more plastic mantle rock called the asthenosphere ("weak layer"). The asthenosphere allows the plates to move slowly over it like a raft in thick mud.

We know that the Earth's outer layer is made of two grand categories of rocks: basaltic and granitic. Basaltic rocks underlie the seafloors and granitic rocks make up the continents. We know that the seismic velocities of these rock types, as measured in the lab, match those seen in the crust down as far as the Moho. Therefore we're confident that the Moho marks a real change in rock chemistry. The Moho isn't a perfect boundary because some crustal rocks and mantle rocks can masquerade as the other. However, everyone who talks about the crust, whether in seismological or petrological terms, fortunately, means the same thing.

In general, then, there are two kinds of crust: oceanic crust (basaltic) and continental crust (granitic).

Oceanic Crust
Oceanic crust covers about 60 percent of the Earth's surface. Oceanic crust is thin and young—no more than about 20 km thick and no older than about 180 million years. Everything older has been pulled underneath the continents by subduction. Oceanic crust is born at the mid-ocean ridges, where plates are pulled apart. As that happens, the pressure upon the underlying mantle is released and the peridotite there responds by starting to melt. The fraction that melts becomes basaltic lava, which rises and erupts while the remaining peridotite becomes depleted.

The mid-ocean ridges migrate over the Earth like Roombas, extracting this basaltic component from the peridotite of the mantle as they go.

This works like a chemical refining process. Basaltic rocks contain more silicon and aluminum than the peridotite left behind, which has more iron and magnesium. Basaltic rocks are also less dense. In terms of minerals, basalt has more feldspar and amphibole, less olivine and pyroxene, than peridotite. In geologist's shorthand, oceanic crust is mafic while oceanic mantle is ultramafic.

Oceanic crust, being so thin, is a very small fraction of the Earth - about 0.1 percent - but its life cycle serves to separate the contents of the upper mantle into a heavy residue and a lighter set of basaltic rocks. It also extracts the so-called incompatible elements, which don't fit into mantle minerals and move into the liquid melt. These, in turn, move into the continental crust as plate tectonics proceeds. Meanwhile, the oceanic crust reacts with seawater and carries some of it down into the mantle.

Continental Crust
Continental crust is thick and old - on average about 50 km thick and about 2 billion years old - and it covers about 40 percent of the planet. Whereas almost all of the oceanic crust is underwater, most of the continental crust is exposed to the air.

The continents slowly grow over geologic time as oceanic crust and seafloor sediments are pulled beneath them by subduction. The descending basalts have the water and incompatible elements squeezed out of them, and this material rises to trigger more melting in the so-called subduction factory.

The continental crust is made of granitic rocks, which have even more silicon and aluminum than the basaltic oceanic crust.

They also have more oxygen thanks to the atmosphere. Granitic rocks are even less dense than basalt. In terms of minerals, granite has even more feldspar and less amphibole than basalt and almost no pyroxene or olivine. It also has abundant quartz. In geologist's shorthand, continental crust is felsic.

Continental crust makes up less than 0.4 percent of the Earth, but it represents the product of a double refining process, first at mid-ocean ridges and second at subduction zones. The total amount of continental crust is slowly growing.

The incompatible elements that end up in the continents are important because they include the major radioactive elements uranium, thorium and potassium. These create heat, which makes the continental crust act like an electric blanket on top of the mantle. The heat also softens thick places in the crust, like the Tibetan Plateau, and makes them spread sideways.

Continental crust is too buoyant to return to the mantle. That's why it is, on average, so old. When continents collide, the crust can thicken to almost 100 km, but that is temporary because it soon spreads out again. The relatively thin skin of limestones and other sedimentary rocks tend to stay on the continents, or in the ocean, rather than return to the mantle. Even the sand and clay that is washed off into the sea returns to the continents on the conveyor belt of the oceanic crust. Continents are truly permanent, self-sustaining features of the Earth's surface.

What the Crust Means
The crust is a thin but important zone where dry, hot rock from the deep Earth reacts with the water and oxygen of the surface, making new kinds of minerals and rocks.

It's also where plate-tectonic activity mixes and scrambles these new rocks and injects them with chemically active fluids. Finally, the crust is the home of life, which exerts strong effects on rock chemistry and has its own systems of mineral recycling. All of the interesting and valuable variety in geology, from metal ores to thick beds of clay and stone, finds its home in the crust and nowhere else.

It should be noted that the Earth isn't the only planetary body with a crust. Venus, Mercury, Mars and the Earth's Moon have one as well.

Edited by Brooks Mitchell

https://www.thoughtco.com/all-about-the-earths-crust-1441114
 

EO 11110

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#15
Certainly the added weight on the ocean floor equates to an increase of pressure in the earths core. I expect Old Faithful will have the big one any moment as well...resulting in even more green house gasses . Fuckin global warming is scary shit.
on the flip side, it will crush more dinosaurs into oil. so we got that going for us
 

Ensoniq

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#16
on the flip side, it will crush more dinosaurs into oil. so we got that going for us
I thought that blood was crushed to oil, and flesh to coal
To enrich the soil, is not everybody's goal

- Peter Gabriel, lamb lies down on Broadway
 

gnome

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#17
A lowering ocean floor would dictate lower water levels not higher levels, are these people on crack or what?
The point is a few billion tons of glacial water is, pardon the analogy, just a drop in the oceanic bucket.
.
.[/QUOTE]

It's hundreds of billions, if not a trillion tons per year and accelerating. But yes, just a drop in the bucket in that we are still measuring sea level rise in mm, rather than cm or m.

If greenland melts completely I think that raises sea level 20 feet which is hard to conceive.
 

Irons

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#18
.
If greenland melts completely I think that raises sea level 20 feet which is hard to conceive.
As long as it happened like overnight it would be OK.

.:2 thumbs up:
 

gnome

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#19
.


As long as it happened like overnight it would be OK.

.:2 thumbs up:
As long as you post in the coffee thread the next morning, I think we'll get through it.
 

Irons

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#20
As long as you post in the coffee thread the next morning, I think we'll get through it.
High ground far from both salty coasts brother! The coffee show will go on.


.:2 thumbs up:
 

ZZZZZ

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#23
The point is a few billion tons of glacial water is, pardon the analogy, just a drop in the oceanic bucket.
.
.
It's hundreds of billions, if not a trillion tons per year and accelerating. But yes, just a drop in the bucket in that we are still measuring sea level rise in mm, rather than cm or m.

If greenland melts completely I think that raises sea level 20 feet which is hard to conceive.
The odds of Greenland completely melting are about as good as Al Gore's prediction that the polar ice cap would have melted by now, and that snow is a thing of the past.

Regardless, there are dozens if not hundreds of examples of ,ancient man-made structures that are now 50 feet or more under water.

https://listverse.com/2013/03/28/10-incredible-submerged-ruins/

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/the-fantastical-beauty-of-underwater-ruins

The ocean levels have been rising for thousands of years. If it continues, it's not the fault of my SUV.
.
.
 

GOLDBRIX

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#24
High ground far from both salty coasts brother! The coffee show will go on.
.:2 thumbs up:
Living West of the Appalachians, and away from the Mississippi River works well for me too.
 

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#25
 

DodgebyDave

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#26

 

JayDubya

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#28
Water dissolving and water removing
There is water at the bottom of the ocean
Under the water, carry the water
Remove the water at the bottom of the ocean!

I just realized the version of the video I originally posted did not include the lyrics I posted.

So, here's the FULL version:
"
"
 
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AguA

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#30
Looks like I'm good where I am. I'd also have a shorter trip to the Gulf. Anyone else?
 

Irons

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#31
Looks like I'm good where I am. I'd also have a shorter trip to the Gulf. Anyone else?
My ride the the beach will be shorter too.

.
 

mtnman

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#32
That's an interesting map. All the problem areas of the country are gone...
 

gnome

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#33
Looks like I'm good where I am. I'd also have a shorter trip to the Gulf. Anyone else?
My mountain will be a part of SoCal archipelago.
 

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#34
I'm pretty sure the ocean floor has been sinking for about 12k years, ever since the end of the last ice age when gazillions of gallons of water were melted from the miles thick ice that was on land at the time. land has been springing upward with the release of press as well.
.08 inches in 2 decades, I can't get to excited about this.
 

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#35
That's an interesting map. All the problem areas of the country are gone...
I've seen this one or similar elsewhere along time back 10-15 years. I think it is Gordon Michael Scallion's vision of the future North American Continent.
 

gnome

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I've seen this one or similar elsewhere along time back 10-15 years. I think it is Gordon Michael Scallion's vision of the future North American Continent.
Yes, that's it. 1980's new age prophecy. Most of his predictions were supposed to come true in the 1990's or early 2000's. http://skepdic.com/scallion.html
 

GOLDBRIX

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#37
That's an interesting map. All the problem areas of the country are gone...
Remember some of those "sheeple" will move before hand like how the PROGS took over Denver, CO.
 

Agavegirl1

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#38
It is indeed part of a collection of world "Doomsday Maps" published in the 80's. I think I got it from Forbes actually. I'd have to look it up.
 

Cigarlover

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#39
I wouldn't mind moving my fig farm to that island off the east coast. Southeast or southwest on that island would be fine. Can I claim a piece of it now? :)