• "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

THE VITAMIN C FANATICS WERE RIGHT ALL ALONG

BarnacleBob

Moderator
Founding Member
Site Mgr
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 15, 2012
Messages
12,795
Likes
20,989
Location
Ten-Oh-Cee
#1
Good read....

THE VITAMIN C FANATICS WERE RIGHT ALL ALONG

http://knowledgeofhealth.com/the-vitamin-c-fanatics-were-right-all-along/

I purchase 1000 mg (1 gram) Sundown Naturals vegetarian Vitamin C tabs, break them in half (500 mg) doses & take a half dose about every 3 - 4 waking hours, consuming about 2 grams (2000 mg) daily, combined with one-half of a Natures Way "Alive" multi-vitamin / multi-mineral in the morning and the remaining half in the evening. Our bodies cannot properly consume some of the RDA of vitamin/mineral supplements in one dosage as the excess will be unused & excreted thru urination process. Hence I break up the daily dosage into two halves and consume 8 - 12 hours apart. By this means one half is being processed by the body during the waking day when I'm most active, the other half is processed in the evening when my activity levels are much lower including sleep time. Some organs like the liver produces most daily Cholesterol when we sleep, while in the waking hours, this cholesterol is converted into Vitamin D3 when we absorb sunlight... hence our bodies & organs use various vitamins & minerals more & less, less & more during our waking & sleeping hours. Hence the reason for dividing supplemental dosages... YMMV
 

Goldhedge

Moderator
Site Mgr
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 28, 2010
Messages
39,527
Likes
59,496
Location
Rocky Mountains
#3
Kind of sounds like back in the schooner days when scurvy was the disease dujour.

Vitamin C deficiency.
 

BarnacleBob

Moderator
Founding Member
Site Mgr
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 15, 2012
Messages
12,795
Likes
20,989
Location
Ten-Oh-Cee
#4
Kind of sounds like back in the schooner days when scurvy was the disease dujour.

Vitamin C deficiency.
@ GH.... Only humans, nonhuman primates, guinea pigs and fish will develop vitamin C deficiency, as these species cannot internally & biologically synthesize Vitamin C for use in the body. These species must obtain Vitamin C thru dietary or supplemental sources. The "recommended daily allowances" (RDA) only allows for an adequate amount of daily Vitamin C to prevent scurvy... unlike biologically synthesized & internally regulated vitamins, etc., medical authorities & researchers dont really know what the proper dosages of Vitamin C are and how often these dosages are required to prevent various known & unknown diseases....

Also note that humans cannot synthesize vitamins A, B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), B5 (pantothenic acid), B6 (pyridoxine), B7 (biotin), B9 (folate), B12 (cobalamin), E and K.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3145266/

For all practical purposes, we can only guess at the RDA for these vitamins that the body cannot synthesize. It stands to reason that many diseases are the result of improper diet that lacks the essential required dosages of vitamins & minerals that the body cannot synthesize.... I suspect that many of these diseases naturally manifest over several decades of nutritional & vitamin deficiencies.

For the above reasons I consume a multi-vitamin that provides & supplements the various unsythesizable vitamins. Many cardio researchers believe that heart & CVD disease is caused in whole or in part by arterial scurvy, a.k.a. scurvy of the circulatory system, a.k.a. a deficiency of vit c, just not an acute deficiency that causes outright full blown scurvy symptoms that attack the entire body.

DYODD

7 Nutrient Deficiencies That Are Incredibly Common

Iron Deficiency. Iron is an essential mineral. ...

Iodine Deficiency. Iodine is an essential mineral for normal thyroid function and the production of thyroid hormones (8). ...

Vitamin D Deficiency. ...

Vitamin B12 Deficiency. ...

Calcium Deficiency. ...

Vitamin A Deficiency. ...

Magnesium Deficiency.

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/7-common-nutrient-deficiencies

11 common nutrient deficiencies include vitamins D, K2, B12, E, and A, omega-3, magnesium, iodine, calcium, iron, and choline

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/.../10/19/most-common-nutrient-deficiencies.aspx

Missing Nutrients in Your Food

Even the most conscientious eaters may have dietary deficiencies.

https://www.webmd.com/diet/features/missing-nutrients-in-your-food

"Under practical feeding situations, only humans, nonhuman primates, guinea pigs and fish will develop vitamin C deficiency if diets are lacking in the vitamin. Dogs and cats synthesize ascorbic acid from glucose in either the liver or kidney, and vitamin C deficiency usually does not occur in such animals."

https://www.dsm.com/markets/anh/en_US/Compendium/companion_animals/vitamin_C.html

"It has long been considered that all animals with the exceptions of guinea pigs, monkeys, and humans can produce their own vitamin C. Scientist have extensively studied the human genome and identified the defective gene for the synthesis of the active enzyme protein, L-gulonolactone oxidase or GLO (Stone 1979)."

https://blog.livonlabs.com/antioxidant/goat-vitamin-c-production/
 

Silver

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
4,705
Likes
7,053
#6
I use a pharmaceutical grade Ascorbic Acid crystalline powder - about 3/4 teaspoon in water twice a day. The brand I'm using right now is NutriBiotic, it's pretty cheap - 8ozs for about $15. I use the max amount before it causes flatulence :)

https://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/vitamins/vitamin-C/supplemental-forms

Linus Pauling Institute » Micronutrient Information Center








The Bioavailability of Different Forms of Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid)
In the rapidly expanding market of dietary supplements, it is possible to find vitamin C in many different forms with many claims regarding its efficacy or bioavailability. Bioavailability refers to the degree to which a nutrient (or drug) becomes available to the target tissue after it has been administered. We reviewed the literature for the results of scientific research on the bioavailability of different forms of vitamin C.​

Natural vs. synthetic ascorbic acid

Natural and synthetic L-ascorbic acid are chemically identical, and there are no known differences in their biological activity. The possibility that the bioavailability of L-ascorbic acid from natural sources might differ from that of synthetic ascorbic acid was investigated in at least two human studies, and no clinically significant differences were observed. A study of 12 males (6 smokers and 6 nonsmokers) found the bioavailability of synthetic ascorbic acid (powder administered in water) to be slightly superior to that of orange juice, based on blood levels of ascorbic acid, and not different based on ascorbic acid in leukocytes (white blood cells) (1). A study in 68 male nonsmokers found that ascorbic acid consumed in cooked broccoli, orange juice, orange slices, and as synthetic ascorbic acid tablets are equally bioavailable, as measured by plasma ascorbic acid levels (2, 3).​

Different forms of ascorbic acid

The gastrointestinal absorption of ascorbic acid occurs through an active transport process, as well as through passive diffusion. At low gastrointestinal concentrations of ascorbic acid active transport predominates, while at high gastrointestinal concentrations active transport becomes saturated, leaving only passive diffusion. In theory, slowing down the rate of stomach emptying (e.g., by taking ascorbic acid with food or taking a slow-release form of ascorbic acid) should increase its absorption. While the bioavailability of ascorbic acid appears equivalent whether it is in the form of powder, chewable tablets, or non-chewable tablets, the bioavailability of ascorbic acid from slow-release preparations is less certain.

A study of three men and one woman found 1 gram of ascorbic acid to be equally well absorbed from solution, tablets, and chewable tablets, but the absorption from a timed-release capsule was 50% lower. Absorption was assessed by measuring urinary excretion of ascorbic acid after an intravenous dose of ascorbic acid and then comparing it to urinary excretion after the oral dosage forms (4).

A more recent study examined the plasma levels of ascorbic acid in 59 male smokers supplemented for two months with either 500 mg/day of slow-release ascorbic acid, 500 mg/day of plain ascorbic acid, or a placebo.

After two months of supplementation no significant differences in plasma ascorbic acid levels between the slow-release and plain ascorbic acid groups were found (5). A second placebo-controlled trial also evaluated plain ascorbic acid versus slow-release ascorbic acid in 48 male smokers (6). Participants were supplemented with either 250 mg plain ascorbic acid, 250 mg slow-release ascorbic acid, or placebo twice daily for four weeks. No differences were observed in the change in plasma ascorbate concentration or area under the curve following ingestion of either formulation.​

Mineral ascorbates

Mineral salts of ascorbic acid (mineral ascorbates) are less acidic, and therefore, considered "buffered." Thus, mineral ascorbates are often recommended to people who experience gastrointestinal problems (upset stomach or diarrhea) with plain ascorbic acid. There appears to be little scientific research to support or refute the claim that mineral ascorbates are less irritating to the gastrointestinal tract. When mineral salts of ascorbic acid are taken, both the ascorbic acid and the mineral appear to be well absorbed, so it is important to consider the dose of the mineral accompanying the ascorbic acid when taking large doses of mineral ascorbates. For the following discussion, it should be noted that 1 gram (g)= 1,000 milligrams (mg) and 1 milligram (mg) = 1,000 micrograms (μg). Mineral ascorbates are available in the following forms:​
  • Sodium ascorbate: 1,000 mg of sodium ascorbate generally contains 111 mg of sodium. Individuals following low-sodium diets (e.g., for high blood pressure) are generally advised to keep their total dietary sodium intake to less than 2,500 mg/day. Thus, megadoses of vitamin C in the form of sodium ascorbate could significantly increase sodium intake (see Sodium Chloride).

  • Calcium ascorbate:
    Calcium ascorbate generally provides 90-110 mg of calcium (890-910 mg of ascorbic acid) per 1,000 mg of calcium ascorbate. Calcium in this form appears to be reasonably well absorbed. The recommended dietary calcium intake for adults is 1,000 to 1,200 mg/day. Total calcium intake should not exceed the UL, which is 2,500 mg/day for adults aged 19-50 years and 2,000 mg/day for adults older than 50 years (see Calcium).
The following mineral ascorbates are more likely to be found in combination with other mineral ascorbates, as well as other minerals. It's a good idea to check the labels of dietary supplements for the ascorbic acid dose as well as the dose of each mineral. Recommended dietary intakes and maximum upper levels of intake (when available) are listed after the individual mineral ascorbates below:​
  • Potassium ascorbate: The minimal requirement for potassium is thought to be between 1.6 and 2.0 g/day. Fruit and vegetables are rich sources of potassium, and a diet rich in fruit and vegetables may provide as much as 8 to 11 g/day. Acute and potentially fatal potassium toxicity (hyperkalemia) is thought to occur at a daily intake of about 18 g/day of potassium in adults. Individuals taking potassium-sparing diuretics and those with renal insufficiency (kidney failure) should avoid significant intake of potassium ascorbate. The purest form of commercially available potassium ascorbate contains 0.175 grams (175 mg) of potassium per gram of ascorbate (see Potassium).

  • Magnesium ascorbate:
    The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for magnesium is 400-420 mg/day for adult men and 310-320 mg/day for adult women. The upper level (UL) of intake for magnesium from supplements should not exceed 350 mg/day (see Magnesium).

  • Zinc ascorbate:
    The RDA for zinc is 11 mg/day for adult men and 8 mg/day for adult women. The upper level (UL) of zinc intake for adults should not exceed 40 mg/day (see Zinc).

  • Molybdenum ascorbate:
    The RDA for molybdenum is 45 micrograms (μg)/day for adult men and women. The upper level (UL) of molybdenum intake for adults should not exceed 2,000 μg (2 mg)/day (see Molybdenum).

  • Chromium ascorbate:
    The recommended dietary intake (AI) for chromium is 30-35 μg/day for adult men and 20-25 μg/day for adult women. A maximum upper level (UL) of intake has not been determined by the US Food and Nutrition Board (see Chromium).

  • Manganese ascorbate:
    The recommended dietary intake (AI) for manganese is 2.3 mg/day for adult men and 1.8 mg/day for adult women. The upper level (UL) of intake for manganese for adults should not exceed 11 mg/day. Manganese ascorbate is found in some preparations of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate, and following the recommended dose on the label of such supplements could result in a daily intake exceeding the upper level for manganese (see Manganese).
Vitamin C with bioflavonoids

Bioflavonoids or flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds found in plants. Vitamin C-rich fruit and vegetables, especially citrus fruit, are often rich sources of flavonoids as well. The effect of bioflavonoids on the bioavailability of ascorbic acid has been recently reviewed (7).

Results from the 10 clinical studies comparing the absorption of vitamin C alone or vitamin C in flavonoid-containing foods showed no appreciable differences in bioavailability of ascorbic acid. Only one study, which included five men and three women, found that a 500-mg supplement of synthetic ascorbic acid, given in a natural citrus extract containing bioflavonoids, proteins, and carbohydrates, was more slowly absorbed and 35% more bioavailable than synthetic ascorbic acid alone, when based on plasma levels of ascorbic acid (8). The remaining studies showed either no change or slightly lower plasma ascorbate levels in subjects who consumed vitamin C with flavonoids compared to flavonoids alone (7).

Another assessment of vitamin C bioavailability is measuring urinary ascorbate levels to approximate rates of vitamin C excretion. One study in six young Japanese males (22-26 years old) showed a significant reduction in urinary excretion of ascorbic acid in the presence of acerola juice, a natural source of both vitamin C and flavonoids (9). However, three separate studies showed that urinary levels of vitamin C were increased after consumption of kiwifruit (10), blackcurrant juice (11), or orange juice (1). Overall, the impact of flavonoids on the bioavailability of vitamin C seems to be negligible; however, there is a need for carefully controlled studies using specific flavonoid extracts (7).​

Ascorbate and vitamin C metabolites (Ester-C®)

Ester-C® contains mainly calcium ascorbate, but also contains small amounts of the vitamin C metabolites, dehydroascorbic acid (oxidized ascorbic acid), calcium threonate, and trace levels of xylonate and lyxonate. In their literature, the manufacturers state that the metabolites, especially threonate, increase the bioavailability of the vitamin C in this product, and they indicate that they have performed a study in humans that demonstrates the increased bioavailability of vitamin C in Ester-C®. This study has not been published in a peer-reviewed journal. A small published study of vitamin C bioavailability in eight women and one man found no difference between Ester-C® and commercially available ascorbic acid tablets with respect to the absorption and urinary excretion of vitamin C (12). Ester-C® should not be confused with ascorbyl palmitate, which is also marketed as "vitamin C ester" (see below).​

Ascorbyl palmitate

Ascorbyl palmitate is a fat-soluble antioxidant used to increase the shelf life of vegetable oils and potato chips (13). It is an amphipathic molecule, meaning one end is water-soluble and the other end is fat-soluble. This dual solubility allows it to be incorporated into cell membranes. When incorporated into the cell membranes of human red blood cells, ascorbyl palmitate has been found to protect them from oxidative damage and to protect α-tocopherol (a fat-soluble antioxidant) from oxidation by free radicals (14). However, the protective effects of ascorbyl palmitate on cell membranes have only been demonstrated in the test tube. Taking ascorbyl palmitate orally probably doesn't result in any significant incorporation into cell membranes because most of it appears to be hydrolyzed (broken apart into palmitate and ascorbic acid) in the human digestive tract before it is absorbed. The ascorbic acid released by the hydrolysis of ascorbyl palmitate appears to be as bioavailable as ascorbic acid alone (15). The presence of ascorbyl palmitate in oral supplements contributes to the ascorbic acid content of the supplement and probably helps protect fat-soluble antioxidants in the supplement. The roles of vitamin C in promoting collagen synthesis and as an antioxidant have generated interest in its use on the skin (see the article, Vitamin C and Skin Health). Ascorbyl palmitate is frequently used in topical preparations because it is more stable than some aqueous (water-soluble) forms of vitamin C (16). Ascorbyl palmitate is also marketed as vitamin C ester," which should not be confused with Ester-C® (see above).​

D-Isoascorbic acid (Erythorbic acid)

Erythorbic acid is an isomer of ascorbic acid. Isomers are compounds that have the same kinds and numbers of atoms, but different molecular arrangements. The difference in molecular arrangement among isomers may result in different chemical properties. Erythorbic acid is used in the US as an antioxidant food additive and is generally recognized as safe. It has been estimated that more than 200 mg erythorbic acid per capita is introduced daily into the US food system. Unlike ascorbic acid, erythorbic acid does not appear to exert vitamin C activity, for example, it did not prevent scurvy in guinea pigs (one of the few animal species other than humans that does not synthesize ascorbic acid). However, guinea pig studies also indicated that increased erythorbic acid intake reduced the bioavailability of ascorbic acid by up to 50%. In contrast, a series of studies in young women found that up to 1,000 mg/day of erythorbic acid for as long as 40 days was rapidly cleared from the body and had little effect on the bioavailability of ascorbic acid, indicating that erythorbic acid does not diminish the bioavailability of ascorbic acid in humans at nutritionally relevant levels of intake (17).​

Other formulations of vitamin C

PureWay-C® is composed of vitamin C and lipid metabolites. Two cell culture studies using PureWay-C® have been published by the same investigators (18, 19), but in vivo data are currently lacking. A small study in healthy adults found that serum levels of vitamin C did not differ when a single oral dose (1 gram) of either PureWay-C® or ascorbic acid was administered (20).

Another formulation of vitamin C, liposomal-encapsulated vitamin C (e.g., Lypo-spheric™ vitamin C) is now commercially available. One report suggested that liposomal-encapsulated vitamin C may be better absorbed than the vitamin in a non-encapsulated form (21).

Large-scale, pharmacokinetic studies are needed to determine how the bioavailability of these vitamin C formulations compares to that of ascorbic acid.​
 

GOLDBRIX

God,Donald Trump,most in GIM2 I Trust. OTHERS-meh
Sr Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Apr 4, 2010
Messages
9,633
Likes
11,079
#7
Magnesium Deficiency.
I've added TWO 250mg Magnesium tablets to my 1000mg Vit. C program.
I read some where calcium based Kidney stones from Vit. C can be reduced with the use of additional magnesium.

One way I do 1000mg Vit. C is to break the tablet in two and put into a half gallon of water (about a half hour to dissolve) Powdered Lemonade, Limeaide(when I can find it), Orange Drink/Orange-ade and Strawberry-Lemonade and drink it throughout the day. I tried in powdered grape drink. It was ok but the lowest on my list to blend with.
In 24 hrs I drink at least a gallon of water. I used the above drinks to break up the monotony of filtered water .

Since my last kidney stone at the end of June 1st of July I have not drank much soda pop, < a 2Ltr since, and those were Caffeine-Free/Sugar-Free version about 8oz at a time.
 

Silver

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
4,705
Likes
7,053
#8
I've added TWO 250mg Magnesium tablets to my 1000mg Vit. C program.
I read some where calcium based Kidney stones from Vit. C can be reduced with the use of additional magnesium.

One way I do 1000mg Vit. C is to break the tablet in two and put into a half gallon of water (about a half hour to dissolve) Powdered Lemonade, Limeaide(when I can find it), Orange Drink/Orange-ade and Strawberry-Lemonade and drink it throughout the day. I tried in powdered grape drink. It was ok but the lowest on my list to blend with.
In 24 hrs I drink at least a gallon of water. I used the above drinks to break up the monotony of filtered water .

Since my last kidney stone at the end of June 1st of July I have not drank much soda pop, < a 2Ltr since, and those were Caffeine-Free/Sugar-Free version about 8oz at a time.
My wife had kidney stones and started drinking Braggs Apple Cider Vinegar in her water container at work all day - dissolved them. TMI, but she would capture her urine to inspect it and could see particles floating in it.
 

BarnacleBob

Moderator
Founding Member
Site Mgr
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 15, 2012
Messages
12,795
Likes
20,989
Location
Ten-Oh-Cee
#9
I've added TWO 250mg Magnesium tablets to my 1000mg Vit. C program.
I read some where calcium based Kidney stones from Vit. C can be reduced with the use of additional magnesium.

One way I do 1000mg Vit. C is to break the tablet in two and put into a half gallon of water (about a half hour to dissolve) Powdered Lemonade, Limeaide(when I can find it), Orange Drink/Orange-ade and Strawberry-Lemonade and drink it throughout the day. I tried in powdered grape drink. It was ok but the lowest on my list to blend with.
In 24 hrs I drink at least a gallon of water. I used the above drinks to break up the monotony of filtered water .

Since my last kidney stone at the end of June 1st of July I have not drank much soda pop, < a 2Ltr since, and those were Caffeine-Free/Sugar-Free version about 8oz at a time.
@ Brix, I take 125 mg Magnesium every other day (split 250 mg). Some cardio research indicates that to much magnesium can increase risk of a cardio event in cardio patients... other research doesnt confirm the risk increase. Hence the reason I use it every other day.

That a good idea of placing 1 gram of V.C. in a gallon of water! I never thought of doing that.... :) The only soda that I know of that even comes close to being safe to drink is Sprite Zero.
 

Goldhedge

Moderator
Site Mgr
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 28, 2010
Messages
39,527
Likes
59,496
Location
Rocky Mountains
#11
I get this eczema on two of my finger tips that cracks and bleeds. I thought it was a reaction to working with wood. Not sure what it is. Any suggestions on minerals for skin issues??
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
24,575
Likes
34,407
Location
Qmerica
#12
I get this eczema on two of my finger tips that cracks and bleeds. I thought it was a reaction to working with wood. Not sure what it is. Any suggestions on minerals for skin issues??
Drink more water, cut down on spicy foods and caffiene, increase alkaline food intake, meditation and outdoor exercise.

At night and during bad spells I would use neosporin as a hydrating vitamin therapy.
 

Silver

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
4,705
Likes
7,053
#13
I get this eczema on two of my finger tips that cracks and bleeds. I thought it was a reaction to working with wood. Not sure what it is. Any suggestions on minerals for skin issues??
Steroid cream/ointment?

Lots of exotic woods are toxic. I was building some big furniture pieces with bubinga and padauk, and I don't know if it was one or the other, or both, but I developed a severe allergy to ragweed afterwards. I had never had any allergies my entire life. It tooks years for my body to quit reacting - I would flush my sinuses with a neti pot several times a day with warm water and a baking soda/salt solution - it finally stopped. It was miserable for years.
 
Last edited:

Goldhedge

Moderator
Site Mgr
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 28, 2010
Messages
39,527
Likes
59,496
Location
Rocky Mountains
#14
Steroid cream/ointment?
Yeah, using a really strong steroid ointment. Slows it down. It comes and goes over time.

Figured some minerals might help it...
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
24,575
Likes
34,407
Location
Qmerica
#16

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
24,575
Likes
34,407
Location
Qmerica
#17

Irons

Deep Sixed
Sr Site Supporter
Mother Lode
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
28,837
Likes
50,724
#18
I take 1000 mg time released C every day. Double it during cold/flu season.


.
 

BarnacleBob

Moderator
Founding Member
Site Mgr
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 15, 2012
Messages
12,795
Likes
20,989
Location
Ten-Oh-Cee
#19
Are You Taking Too Much Calcium, A or D?

Snip:

Most Americans are deficient in vitamin D and have blood levels in the 20s. So most doctors recommend vitamin D supplements to bring blood levels up to 30 ng/mL. ... The extra vitamin D triggers extra calcium absorption. This can cause muscle pain, mood disorders, abdominal pain and kidney stones.

https://health.clevelandclinic.org/supplements-taking-many-can-hurt/
 

BarnacleBob

Moderator
Founding Member
Site Mgr
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 15, 2012
Messages
12,795
Likes
20,989
Location
Ten-Oh-Cee
#20

southfork

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
16,127
Likes
15,200
#21
Wheres the best place to buy good vitamins , hard to know where to get the best adsorbing ones and effective ones
 

Irons

Deep Sixed
Sr Site Supporter
Mother Lode
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
28,837
Likes
50,724
#22

everything

New Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2019
Messages
19
Likes
25
#24
The Lypo-spheric™ C from livon or others, is probably the gold standard right now for bio-availability second to intravenous. Prior to the antibiotic this is what they used, and for sepsis, at least over in Europe, they are using it as a last resort and finding that it works quite well. Vitamin C is pretty harmless, and we can take up to 10,000mg per day or to bowel tolerance.

Now, we don't need to spend that kind of bling on our Vitamin C, and the daily recommended is less than 100mg. But, if you get sick, the Lypo's could save your life. Vitamin C feeds your immune cells, that of which we have many types of them. We can also fast when very ill, and many do because they don't feel so good, probably a natural process, like the fever.

I keep a box stocked for emergency, then just use it up during the flu and cold season to juice or supercharge my immunity, then stock another fresh box. It's kind of an insurance policy I take out for antibiotic avoidance.
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
24,575
Likes
34,407
Location
Qmerica
#26

PhucilliJerry

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Feb 3, 2011
Messages
1,053
Likes
834
#27
Not to poop on anyone's parade, but as with nearly everything in life, diet is key. If you're eating a high-carb SAD (Standard American Diet) you "need" to supplement Vitamin C because glucose and ascorbic acid compete for insulin's attention. I don't recall where I saw it, but if I remember correctly glucose usually wins out, so you need to supplement serious excess amounts (most of which you are just peeing out anyway) to stay around until the glucose is taken care of, then insulin can deliver the ascorbic acid to your cells. If you're drinking sugary drinks or eating high carb foods when taking the supplement, you might as well just save your body the trouble and put the pill/powder directly in the toilet.

...shows that insulin carries both glucose and ascorbic acid to all cells of the body, including the phago-cytic cells that seek, attack, and remove bacteria, viruses, tumor cells, and assorted microscopic cellular debris from the blood. This common transport system describes the competition between glucose and ascorbic acid and explains why, in order to exert a beneficial effect, large doses of ascorbic acid are necessary to overcome inhibition by glucose. Glucose not only inhibits the transport of ascorbic acid to all cells of the body but also inhibits stimulation of the hexose monophosphate (HMP) shunt by ascorbic acid.



According to the article BB posted:

Hickey and Roberts show that NIH investigators failed to calculate for the half life of vitamin C, which is about 30 minutes in humans. (The half-life is the time it takes for something to disappear from the human body.)

Ignoring the incorrect explanation of half-life, BB's 500 mg would breakdown as follows:

Mins---mg
30-----500
60-----250
90-----125
120-----62.5
150-----31.25
180-----15.625
210------7.8125
240------3.90625

*Sorry, don't know how to import from Excel anymore so I had to manually do the above chart.

So at the 4 hour mark he has 3.90625mg left in his blood stream. Has insulin gotten around to delivering the ascorbic acid to his cells or is it still dealing with glucose (assuming he isn't low carb/keto and there is still glucose to be dealt with)?

Depending on your diet, probably not:

About four to six hours after you eat, the glucose levels in your blood decrease, triggering your pancreas to produce glucagon. This hormone signals your liver and muscle cells to change the stored glycogen back into glucose. These cells then release the glucose into your bloodstream so your other cells can use it for energy.

So, 4-6 hours after you eat the glucose levels have decreased, BUT, if you ate excess carbs and your liver or muscle cells stored glycogen, they then release that as glucose back into your bloodstream and insulin takes that up and you pee out more ascorbic acid........


Or you can just eat low carb, getting all of the Vitamin C you need from your diet; veggies and meats (as long as you aren't eating only guinea pigs). If you still feel the need to supplement, a lot more will be delivered to your cells without the presence of too much glucose, which we do make ourselves in small amounts, and do not need to consume.

All this being said, I am interested in reading this book and will be looking for a copy on the cheap. Thanks for the article and stoking more interest for me BB!