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Those Wonderful Mushrooms

Alton

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No, not THOSE kind of mushrooms!

Fungi that absorbs radiation has been growing all over Chernobyl plant



John Vibes
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Mon, 10 Feb 2020 09:04 UTC






Certain types of fungi are attracted to radiation, and can actually neutralize radiation in certain environments.

For a long time, scientists have known that certain types of fungi are attracted to radiation, and can actually help to break down and neutralize radiation in certain environments.

The radioactive site of the abandoned Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant has acted as a real-life laboratory in many ways over the years, giving researchers a look into the physical impact that radiation has on plant and animal life.

In 1991, while a team of researchers was searching the Chernobyl area remotely with robots, they noticed black-spotted fungi growing on the walls of one of the nuclear reactors. They also observed that the fungi appeared to be breaking down radioactive graphite from the core itself. The fungi also seemed to be growing towards the source of the radiation, as if it was attracted to it.

Follow up research in 2007, at the University of Saskatchewan found that different types of fungi are attracted to radiation. A team led by Professor Ekaterina Dadachova observed that some types of fungi grew more rapidly when exposed to radiation.

The three species that were tested were Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Cryptococcus neoformans and Wangiella dermatitidis, all of which grew faster when exposed to radiation. The scientists believe that since these species had large amounts of the pigment melanin, it allows them to absorb things like radiation and convert it into chemical energy for growth.

Another follow-up study, in which eight species collected from the Chernobyl area were sent to the International Space Station (ISS) began in 2016, but has yet to be published. Scientists are eagerly awaiting the results of the study, considering that the samples are being exposed to between 40 and 80 times more radiation than they would here on Earth. If this study is successful, experts hope that the knowledge gained can be used to produce drugs that could protect astronauts from radiation on long-term missions.

It has also been suggested that the results of this study could lead to the development of fungi-based cancer treatments.
 

Someone_else

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...can actually help to break down and neutralize radiation in certain environments.
No. They can not neutralize radiation.

Maybe they can absorb a tiny fraction of the gamma emissions, in the same way that water, concrete, lead, and indeed any substance can. Maybe they can encapsulate the radioactive elements, and make it easier to concentrate and remove them from the site. The author seems a bit confused about how radioactive elements work. Or maybe he is not explaining it well enough.
 

newmisty

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newmisty

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spinalcracker

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No. They can not neutralize radiation.

Maybe they can absorb a tiny fraction of the gamma emissions, in the same way that water, concrete, lead, and indeed any substance can. Maybe they can encapsulate the radioactive elements, and make it easier to concentrate and remove them from the site. The author seems a bit confused about how radioactive elements work. Or maybe he is not explaining it well enough.
what are your thoughts on this article......



How Cannabis Cleans Up Nuclear Radiation And Toxic Soil
Chris Roberts
Published 3 years ago on March 16, 2017

Europe’s largest steel mill is in the city of Taranto in southern Italy. In its heyday, the ILVA steel plant produced more than 10 million tons of steel every year—about 40 percent of all the steel made in Italy—and it currently employs about 12,000 people.

This is no small deal in an area where unemployment is north of 20 percent; indeed, the local economy of Taranto, population 200,000, is almost entirely dependent on the steel mill—which is also one of the biggest and most deadly polluters of anywhere in the Mediterranean.

The plant is a notorious source of dioxin, and dust from the plant is believed to be the reason why Taranto has a lung cancer rate 30 percent higher than the national average. It’s so toxic that farmers have been forbidden from raising livestock within a 20-kilometer radius of the plant; in 2008, the government ordered the slaughter of thousands of sheep and other animals that were found to have excessively high levels of dioxin.

The mill is also debatably hurting the local economy; the area has a mix of nice beaches and pastoral farmland that would make it attractive to tourists, if it weren’t for the deadly steel mill.

What to do about this?

The mill is currently under government control, after saga straight out of John Grisham: Health officials ordered the mill partially shut down, a move blocked by government authorities; police partially occupied the plant as part of a criminal investigation, and its owners were ultimately arrested and jailed for committing “environmental disaster,” a serious crime in Italy. Meanwhile, the steel mill is still open, though producing much less steel (and hopefully less cancer).

But for the farmers who raised sheep and made ricotta cheese for generations in the area where the steel mill was built in the 1960s, the factory may as well be going full-blast.

Vincenzo Fornaro’s farm is less than a mile from the steel mill. His entire stash of 600 sheep had to be killed over a decade ago, and he’s since been forbidden from raising livestock or crops for food. So instead, as CBS News reported, he’s growing weed—not to smoke or to sell, but to pull the steel mill’s toxins out of his soil.

Fornaro has planted massive stands of industrial hemp on his farm. He’s employing a tactic called “phytoremediation,” in which plants are used to remove heavy metals, radioactive material and other bad stuff from the earth.

Industrial hemp has been used to clean up deadly pollutants before, perhaps most famously near the site of the deadly nuclear meltdown at Chernobyl in what is now Ukraine (and where, it should not go unstated, thousands of people are still at work at the power station, which produces six percent of the nation’s electricity). In the mid-1990s, a company called Phytotech worked with researchers and a Ukraine-based seed bank to plant thousands of hemp plants in and around Chernobyl.
 

Goldhedge

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dacrunch

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After Chernobyl, the French Government claimed that the Radioactive Cloud had "stopped at the border"... and didn't implement ANY prevention measures. No checking the milk from cows eating grass, no ban on picking & eating mushrooms, which are known to absorb and concentrate heavy metals...
 

Someone_else

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Fornaro has planted massive stands of industrial hemp on his farm. He’s employing a tactic called “phytoremediation,” in which plants are used to remove heavy metals, radioactive material and other bad stuff from the earth.
That sounds great. I have read elsewhere of hemp removing toxic substances from the soil.

If these mushrooms can biochemically bind to the radioactive fallout from the area, that would make it easier to make it safer. Presumably, the mushrooms would be disposed of carefully.