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Top 20 Weapons The U.S. Military Uses Toda

Goldhedge

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Top 20 Weapons The U.S. Military Uses Today


M4 Carbine

The first of our modern U.S. Military weapons is it in a class of its own as a first-rate combat weapon system.

First designed in 1984, the M4 carbine is a gas-operated, air-cooled, magazine-fed carbine that has become the standard issue firearm for most units in the U.S. military, largely replacing the M16 rifle. A shorter, lighter version of the M16A2 rifle, the M4 allows soldiers operating in close quarters to more accurately engage targets at extended range. The weapon is compact yet instantly delivers the level of firepower, dependability and accuracy of a 5.56mm rifle.

The M4 features a collapsible stock and detachable carrying handle. It can be fired in both semi-automatic and three-round burst modes, while the M4A1 is capable of firing fully automatic. Additionally, the M4 can mount the M203 and M320 grenade launchers, making it a highly adaptable and effective all-around firearm for the military.



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M2010 Enhanced Sniper Rifle

The M2010 Enhaced Sniper Rifle (ESR), formerly known as the XM2010, was developed specifically for the mountainous and desert terrain seen in the War in Afghanistan. Derived from the M24 Sniper Weapon System, the M2010 .300 Winchester Magnum ammunition provides approximately 50 percent additional effective range relative to the M24.

In 2011, the U.S. Army opted to replace its entire fleet of M24s with M2010s, ordering 2,558 rifles. The M2010 achieved Type Classification-Standard in July 2013 and Full Materiel Release in September 2013.



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M2 Browning Machine Gun

The M2 machine gun, first designed by John Browning, is a .50 caliber heavy machine gun that has been used extensively as a vehicle weapon and for aircraft armament by the U.S. military for more than 80 years. It is effective against infantry, unarmored or lightly armored vehicles and boats, light fortifications, and low-flying aircraft, and has been produced longer than any other machine gun.

The M2 has been used by the United States in nearly every war from World War II to the War in Afghanistan, and it is the primary heavy machine gun of the NATO countries. The M2 has been in use longer than any other firearm in U.S. inventory except the .45 ACP M1911 pistol, which was also designed by Browning.



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M249 Squad Automatic Weapon

The M249 light machine gun, often referred to as the M249 Squad Automatic Weapon or SAW, was introduced in 1984 to address the lack of automatic firepower in small units. The M249 provides infantry squads with both the high rate of fire of a machine gun and the accuracy and portability of a rifle. It has seen action in every major conflict involving the U.S. since the invasion of Panama in 1989, although the Marine Corps is fielding a plan to replace the M249 with the M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle.




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MK19 Grenade Launcher

The MK19 grenade launcher is a 40 mm belt-fed grenade launcher that was first developed for use by the Navy during the Vietnam War. While the first model was both unreliable and unsafe, the Navy improved upon the weapon, resulting in the Mod 3 in 1976. The Mod 3 was adopted by the Army in 1983 and remains the primary suppressive weapon for combat support and combat service support units today.

The MK19 can be fired from a tripod or vehicle mount. It can pierce armor up to two inches thick, and produces fragments to kill personnel within five meters and wound personnel within 15 meters of the point of impact, making it an ideal weapon to defend against lightly armored vehicles and infantry forces.




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BGM-71 TOW

First fielded in 1970, the BGM-71 TOW is one of the most widely used anti-tank guided missiles in the world. The TOW can be both manually carried and mounted on a vehicle, and is even carried on helicopters. It is a wire-guided missile with semiautomatic guidance, and requires the shooter to keep the target in the line of sight until the missile impacts.

The BGM-71 TOW has been used extensively in several wars since it was first used in Vietnam, including the Persian Gulf War, the Iraq War, and the Syrian Civil War.




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M109A6 Paladin

The M109 is a 155 mm self-propelled howizter used by militaries across the world, with the M109A6 Paladin being the variant used by the U.S. military. While a typical M109 needs a crew of six, the M109A6 Paladin needs only a crew of four: the commander, driver, gunner, and an ammunition loader.

The M109A6 improved upon the M109’s survivability, RAM, and armament. Most notably, the M109A6 uses an encrypted digital communication system, which utilizes computer controlled frequency hopping to avoid enemy electronic warfare.



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M1 Abrams

The M1 Abrams is a third-generation main battle tank, named for General Creighton Abrams. Designed for modern armored ground warfare, the M1 Abrams is highly mobile despite being very heavy, weighing in at nearly 68 tons.

The M1 Abrams has been in service since 1980 and is the main battle tank of the U.S. Army and Marine Corps. Three main versions of the tank have been deployed: the M1, M1A1, and M1A2. While outwardly similar in appearance to the M1A1, the M1A2 made significant improvements upon the tank’s interior technology, including adding the Inter-Vehicle Information System (IVIS), which allows for the automatic and continual exchange of information between vehicles.




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TALON Tracked Military Robot

TALON, designed and built by Foster-Miller, is a lightweight, unmanned, tracked military robot developed to protect warfighters and first responders against explosive threats. It can travel through sand, water, snow, and even climb stairs. Initially deployed by the explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) teams for military operations in Bosnia in 2000, TALON has been in service with the U.S. military since 2001. According to Foster-Miller, the robot has performed around 20,000 EOD missions in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.




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ADAPTIV Invisibility Cloak

Invisibility cloaks were a work of fantasy until the development of ADAPTIVE. Developed and patented in Sweden by BAE Systems, the ADAPTIV camouflage system functions over infrared and other electronic frequencies to effectively render large pieces of military equipment invisible. The system consists of an array of hexagonal Peltier plates that can be heated and cooled to either blend the coated object into the natural background or reflect back an image of an entirely different object. For example, a tank can be made to look like a car.




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F-22 Raptor

The F-22 Raptor is a fifth-generation stealth tactical fighter aircraft that completely revolutionized the concept of the fighter jet. Indeed, no other nation has a fighter aircraft that can match the capabilities of the F-22.

A critical component of the Global Strike Task Force, the F-22 is designed to project air dominance, rapidly and at great distances, and defeat threats attempting to deny access to our nation’s Air Force, Army, Navy, and Marine Corps. Unfortunately, the high cost of the F-22 led to the end of its production, and it is slowly but surely being replaced by the plane featured on the next slide.




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F-35 Lightning II

The F-35 Lightning II, produced by Lockheed Martin, is a fifth-generation stealth multirole combat aircraft designed to perform ground attack and air superiority missions. The F-35 features three main models: the F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) variant, the F-35B short take-off and vertical-landing (STOVL) variant, and the F-35C carrier-based Catapult Assisted Take-Off But Arrested Recovery (CATOBAR) variant.

The F-35 program is the most expensive military weapons program in history, and has received extensive criticism. However, variants of the F-35 are expected to provide the bulk of the crewed tactical airpower of the U.S. Air Force, Navy, and Marines – replacing the F-22 Raptor – over the coming decades, with a projected service life up to 2070.



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B-2 Spirit

The B-2 Spirit, also known as the Stealth Bomber, is one of the most sophisticated multi-role bombers in the world. Manufactured by Northrop Grumman for the United States Air Force, the B-2 is capable of deploying both conventional and thermonuclear weapons, and is virtually undetectable by radar. It is also the only acknowledged aircraft that can carry large air-to-surface standoff weapons in a stealth configuration.

The B-2 is capable of all-altitude attack missions up to 50,000 feet with a range of nearly 7,000 miles, making it an intercontinental bomber. There are currently 20 B-2s in service with the Air Force, which plans to operate the bomber until 2058.




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AH-64 Apache

The AH-64 Apache is an attack helicopter that has been in the service of the U.S. Army since 1986. With more than 2,000 AH-64s produced to date, the Apache is proof that if the technology isn’t broke you don’t need to fix it.

The Apache attack helicopter features a nose-mounted sensor suite for target acquisition and night vision systems. It’s armed with a 30 mm M230 chain gun, and can carry a host of armament and stores, usually a mixture of AGM-114 Hellfire missiles and Hydra 70 rocket pods. Apaches have served in Panama, the Persian Gulf, Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq, particularly in the fight against ISIS.




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MQ-9 Reaper

The MQ-9 Reaper is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) developed by General Atomics primarily for use by the U.S. Air Force. However, given its effectiveness at surveillance and its hunter-killer capability, the Reaper has also been adopted by the U.S. Navy, the CIA, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, NASA, and the militaries of several other countries.

While UAVs were primarily developed for reconnaissance, surveillance, and intelligence-gathering, the Air Force has transitioned to primarily using the Reaper in a hunter-killer role. In 2011, the Air Force was training more pilots for advanced unmanned aerial vehicles than for any other single weapons system.




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Arleigh Burke-Class Destroyer

Named for Admiral Arleigh Burke, the Arleigh Burke-class of guided missile destroyers is the U.S. Navy’s first class of destroyer built around the Aegis Combat System. Designed as multimission destroyers, they come armed with a variety of weapons ranging from surface-to-air missiles, surface-to-surface missiles, anti-submarine rockets, torpedoes, 5-inch deck guns, and ASW helicopters.

There are currently 62 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers in service, and the class has the longest production run for any post-World War II U.S. Navy surface combatant.



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Nimitz-Class Aircraft Carrier

The Nimitz-class supercarriers are a class of 10 nuclear-powered aircraft carriers in service of the U.S. Navy. They are the largest warships in the world, and as an embarked carrier wing is typically deployed with 90 aircraft onboard, a single Nimitz-class carrier contains more firepower than many whole nations.

Nimitz-class carriers are propelled by two nuclear A4W pressurized water reactors, and are capable of operating for over 20 years without refueling. Nimitz-class carriers have operated in conflicts and operations across the world since the 1970s, including Iran, the Gulf War, and Iraq and Afghanistan.




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Ohio-Class Submarine

The Ohio-class of submarines were specifically designed for stealth and the precise delivery of nuclear weapons anywhere in the world. There are currently 18 Ohio-class submarines in service of the U.S. Navy: 14 ballistic missile submarines and four that were later converted to guided-missile submarines.

Ohio-class submarines are the largest submarines ever built for the Navy and can carry 24 Trident II D5 missiles apiece. Ultra-quiet, they are nuclear powered and can run for up to 20 years without refueling.




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Virginia-Class Submarine

The Virginia class, also known as the SSN-774 class, is a class of nuclear-powered fast-attack submarines that is the U.S. Navy’s newest undersea warfare platform. First put into commission in 2004, the Virginia class features the latest in stealth, intelligence gathering, and weapons systems technology. They are designed for a broad spectrum of open ocean and littoral, or shallow coastal water, missions, and can launch power ashore via Tomahawk cruise missiles and covert insertion of special forces.

Virginia-class submarines will be acquired through 2043, and some are expected to still be in service in 2070.




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Trident II D5 Missile

The Trident II D5 is a submarine-launched ballistic missile. It was first deployed in 1990 and remains in service today; in fact, the U.S. Navy awarded Lockheed Martin a $43.9 million contract to continue producing the D5, which is expected to form the backbone of America’s nuclear deterrent arsenal through 2040.

D5 missiles are extremely reliable, executing 165 successful test flights since 1989. They’re also extremely potent: a single D5 equipped with multiple independently targetable reentry vehicles carrying nuclear warheads can destroy a small country – like North Korea.



https://thepoliticalinsider.com/top-20-weapons-us-military-modern/
 

mayhem

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Makes me feel all warm and fuzzy.


/sarc
 

Area51

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Media shills and Hollywood are two of the biggest weapons the US military uses.
 

mtnman

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While all those are cool as shit...they don't talk about our Satellite based LASER systems, nor do they talk about our ship mounted LASER weapons. Notice that since the Hawaii missile defense system picked up an incoming missile from NK there's been no talk of NK's nuclear ambitions. I'm pretty sure our satellite based LASER weapons popped that NK missile that Hawaii picked up. But we can't tell the rest of the world we have such weapons...
 

<SLV>

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These are only the weapons that WE know about.
 

Area51

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While all those are cool as shit...they don't talk about our Satellite based LASER systems, nor do they talk about our ship mounted LASER weapons. Notice that since the Hawaii missile defense system picked up an incoming missile from NK there's been no talk of NK's nuclear ambitions. I'm pretty sure our satellite based LASER weapons popped that NK missile that Hawaii picked up. But we can't tell the rest of the world we have such weapons...
A third world backwater like North Korea is a comical "threat".

This dinkified little shithole still hasn't figured out how to get electricity and running water to the majority of the country, but we're supposed to tremble at their nuclear warhead "capability"?

Sorry but I call bullshit on this little storyline.
 

mtnman

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A third world backwater like North Korea is a comical "threat".

This dinkified little shithole still hasn't figured out how to get electricity and running water to the majority of the country, but we're supposed to tremble at their nuclear warhead "capability"?

Sorry but I call bullshit on this little storyline.
Lots of "shithole" countries are nuclear but they keep to themselves...
 

Silvergun

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Directed Energy Weapons (D.E.W.s)









Geo Weapons

H.A.A.R.P.





SMART DUST

This article is part of ReadWrite Future Tech, an annual series in which we explore how technologies that will shape our lives in the years to come are grounded in the innovation and research of today.

The year is 2035, and Sgt. Bill Traverse and his team of commandos are performing a “sweep and clean” operation through a portion of the war-torn Mexico City. Their job is to find any hidden pockets of resistance and flush them out and back through the neutral zone or eliminate them. The drones that provide surveillance overhead cannot offer much support in the twisting alleys and passageways of the sprawling metropolis and the helmet-based HUD systems that soldiers are equipped with are useless in a city where all technical infrastructure was destroyed years ago.

Sgt. Traverse isn’t navigating blind, though. He and his team use Dust, portable packets of sensors that float in the air throughout the entire city and track movement, biometric indicators, temperature change and chemical composition of everything in their city. The Dust sensors send information back to their HUD displays through a communications receiver carried1 by a member of the team. Traverse can tell, from the readings that Dust gives him, if there are people around the next corner and if they are holding weapons. His team can then proceed accordingly …

This scene of Sgt. Traverse and his merry men is a fiction. The concept of Dust is not.

Smart Dust: The Sensors That Track Every Thing, Everywhere

https://readwrite.com/2013/11/14/what-is-smartdust-what-is-smartdust-used-for/


https://www.fastcompany.com/3022114/forget-the-internet-of-things-the-future-is-smart-dust

https://medium.com/war-is-boring/smart-dust-is-getting-smarter-4b062abd7769


https://www.forbes.com/sites/elisea...e-used-to-monitor-human-thought/#338213107ebf

DYODD!!!!RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH

 

Thecrensh

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Directed Energy Weapons (D.E.W.s)









Geo Weapons

H.A.A.R.P.





SMART DUST

This article is part of ReadWrite Future Tech, an annual series in which we explore how technologies that will shape our lives in the years to come are grounded in the innovation and research of today.

The year is 2035, and Sgt. Bill Traverse and his team of commandos are performing a “sweep and clean” operation through a portion of the war-torn Mexico City. Their job is to find any hidden pockets of resistance and flush them out and back through the neutral zone or eliminate them. The drones that provide surveillance overhead cannot offer much support in the twisting alleys and passageways of the sprawling metropolis and the helmet-based HUD systems that soldiers are equipped with are useless in a city where all technical infrastructure was destroyed years ago.

Sgt. Traverse isn’t navigating blind, though. He and his team use Dust, portable packets of sensors that float in the air throughout the entire city and track movement, biometric indicators, temperature change and chemical composition of everything in their city. The Dust sensors send information back to their HUD displays through a communications receiver carried1 by a member of the team. Traverse can tell, from the readings that Dust gives him, if there are people around the next corner and if they are holding weapons. His team can then proceed accordingly …

This scene of Sgt. Traverse and his merry men is a fiction. The concept of Dust is not.

Smart Dust: The Sensors That Track Every Thing, Everywhere

https://readwrite.com/2013/11/14/what-is-smartdust-what-is-smartdust-used-for/


https://www.fastcompany.com/3022114/forget-the-internet-of-things-the-future-is-smart-dust

https://medium.com/war-is-boring/smart-dust-is-getting-smarter-4b062abd7769


https://www.forbes.com/sites/elisea...e-used-to-monitor-human-thought/#338213107ebf

DYODD!!!!RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH
When I lived in Hawaii, if that big floating dome was in port, military personnel were instructed not to discuss or take photos of it. Funny thing is, you can see the stupid thing from pretty much half of the island.