• Same story, different day...........year ie more of the same fiat floods the world
  • There are no markets
  • "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

Trump marijuana.

Irons

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Irons

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Duuudes look what I found walking my dog in the park today! Dope!!
Yep, it's OK to be jealous. It's about 3/4 full too. Looks/smells like sticky green bud from the old days.
Mmmmm Dope!
I need to get some mountain dew, doritos and tootsie rolls and smoke a bunch of this stuff!
It's gonna be cool as hell man, like high school! . . . :2 thumbs up:


dope1 (1).JPG
dope1 (2).JPG
 

Mujahideen

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If that's weed there then you are committing a federal crime Irons, minimum sentence there is 1 year.
 

Irons

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If that's weed there then you are committing a federal crime Irons, minimum sentence there is 1 year.
You are really harshing my buzz man.




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searcher

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Sessions Hints at Shift in Federal Marijuana Enforcement

Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Wednesday that the Justice Department is 'working our way to a rational policy' on marijuana enforcement.

By Alan Neuhauser, Staff Writer |Nov. 29, 2017, at 2:11 p.m.

The Justice Department is "working our way to a rational policy" on marijuana enforcement, the attorney general said Wednesday. (Cliff Owen/AP)

Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Wednesday gave his strongest signal yet that the Justice Department's more hands-off approach to marijuana enforcement may soon be changing.

Sessions said that the department is looking "very hard right now" at a directive carried over from the Obama administration that effectively encourages federal prosecutors to generally defer to state laws that legalize marijuana use.

"We had meetings yesterday and talked about it at some length," the attorney general said, speaking at a press conference on new measures to combat opioid abuse. "It's my view that the use of marijuana is detrimental, and we should not give encouragement in any way to it, and it represents a federal violation, which is in the law and it's subject to being enforced, and our priorities will have to be focused on all the things and challenges we face."

He added: "We'll be working our way through to a rational policy. But I don't want to suggest in any way that this department believes that marijuana is harmless and people should not avoid it."

Sessions, a former Republican senator from Alabama who built a reputation on Capitol Hill as a supporter of traditional law-and-order policies, has long been a vocal opponent of legalizing marijuana.

He has been critical of the so-called "Cole memo" from 2013, authored by Deputy Attorney General James Cole, which told Justice Department attorneys that marijuana use in "jurisdictions that have enacted laws legalizing marijuana in some form … is less likely to threaten federal priorities."

As attorney general, he has roundly dismissed research that has linked the use of medical marijuana to reductions in opioid-related deaths. In May, he explicitly asked Congress in a letter to undo a 2014 amendment that has protected medical marijuana providers.

"I am astonished to hear people suggest that we can solve our heroin crisis by legalizing marijuana – so people can trade one life-wrecking dependency for another that's only slightly less awful," Sessions said in March during a speech in Richmond, Virginia.

[READ: Sessions Steps Up Enforcement Actions in Opioid Crisis]

Since April, a task force at the Justice Department has been reviewing the Cole memo and the department's approach to marijuana enforcement. Documents obtained by the Associated Press this summer indicated that the task force recommended largely keeping the Cole memo in place.

Nevertheless, Sessions' remarks on Wednesday – reinforced by his continued opposition to a more lenient approach to marijuana enforcement since becoming attorney general, even as the task force was providing him periodic updates on its findings – suggest he may take a different approach.

https://www.usnews.com/news/nationa...nts-at-shift-in-federal-marijuana-enforcement
 

the_shootist

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Duuudes look what I found walking my dog in the park today! Dope!!
Yep, it's OK to be jealous. It's about 3/4 full too. Looks/smells like sticky green bud from the old days.
Mmmmm Dope!
I need to get some mountain dew, doritos and tootsie rolls and smoke a bunch of this stuff!
It's gonna be cool as hell man, like high school! . . . :2 thumbs up:


View attachment 94134 View attachment 94135
Technology has come a long way since those days:


 

Irons

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Hell I threw it in the trash right after I took the pictures.
I don't have any use for dope and the people I know who waste their time smoking it can get their own.


.
 

Thecrensh

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Hell I threw it in the trash right after I took the pictures.
I don't have any use for dope and the people I know who waste their time smoking it can get their own.


.
Doesn't matter...a heavily armed team in an assault vehicle is speeding towards your IP address at this very minute. They may get it wrong and bust in to shoot and arrest your next door neighbor (and dog), but don't worry...they are doing the right thing.
 

Irons

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Doesn't matter...a heavily armed team in an assault vehicle is speeding towards your IP address at this very minute. They may get it wrong and bust in to shoot and arrest your next door neighbor (and dog), but don't worry...they are doing the right thing.
..................................
aroll.gif



.
 

DodgebyDave

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3 hots, a cot, lay around and read all day. Almost qualifies a guy to be a congressman!
 

dacrunch

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Can't toke any more - turn white as a sheet & have to lie down for a couple hours! (Well, with my prescribed daily opioid & valium intake...adds a little too much!)
 

searcher

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As California prepares to legalize marijuana on New Year's Day with more than 70 outlets already licensed to sell the drug, analysts predict it could net the state more profits than BEER by 2019
  • Starting Monday, retailers can legally sell recreational marijuana in California
  • In 2018 alone, cannabis dispensaries are expected to earn $3.7billion and jump by more than a billion in 2019
  • Pot could bring in more revenue than beer, which brought in $5billion this year
  • More than 70 retailers have been licensed to start selling recreational marijuana
  • California's Bureau of Cannabis Control has warned that patience is not necessary as not everyone will be able to buy or sell the drug on January 1


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5224881/California-net-profits-marijuana-beer.html#ixzz52skXAUCO
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
 

Thecrensh

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As California prepares to legalize marijuana on New Year's Day with more than 70 outlets already licensed to sell the drug, analysts predict it could net the state more profits than BEER by 2019
  • Starting Monday, retailers can legally sell recreational marijuana in California
  • In 2018 alone, cannabis dispensaries are expected to earn $3.7billion and jump by more than a billion in 2019
  • Pot could bring in more revenue than beer, which brought in $5billion this year
  • More than 70 retailers have been licensed to start selling recreational marijuana
  • California's Bureau of Cannabis Control has warned that patience is not necessary as not everyone will be able to buy or sell the drug on January 1


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5224881/California-net-profits-marijuana-beer.html#ixzz52skXAUCO
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
Why not? Half the population is already smoking it anyway. Why not fund the gov using it.
 

spinalcracker

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I would love to sit down with Mad Dog over a joint and some coffee......




Veterans Administration Loosens Cannabis Policy

Veterans will now be able to speak a bit more freely about medical cannabis with their Veterans Health Administration (VHA) doctors. On December 8, the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) updated their policy, encouraging VHA health care providers to discuss cannabis use with veterans. VHA physicians are still barred from completing the state paperwork required for veterans to register, but the new directive states “[v]eterans must not be denied VHA services solely because they are participating in state-approved marijuana programs.”

VHA Directive 2017-1315 replaces a 2011 directive (VHA 2011-004) that technically expired in 2016 but remained department policy. The new directive encourages allows VHA providers to discuss cannabis with any Veteran seeking information about it, including how using it to treat medical or psychiatric conditions may relate to other medications or aspects of overall care.

“This change in policy is a victory for veterans because it encourages open and honest conversations between VA doctors and veterans about cannabis use,” said Steph Sherer, Executive Director of Americans for Safe Access. “For veterans suffering from PTSD, chronic pain, and a variety of other ailments, cannabis cannot be left out of the discussion as a safe and effective treatment. We would like to see the VA continue to make steps forward that will improve both access and research for veterans.”

VHA providers are still barred by the policy from completing state forms or providing formal recommendations to veterans for state approved medical cannabis programs. All doctors and other professionals have a protected First Amendment right to recommend medical cannabis to patients, thanks to the US Supreme Court’s 2003 decision in the Conant case.

The VA will still neither pay for nor provide cannabis for veterans, nor can veterans possess cannabis while on VA property. If a veteran reports cannabis use and/or participation in a state-approved program to a member of VHA clinical staff, that information is entered into the “non-VA/herbal/Over the Counter (OTC) medication” section of the veteran’s record.

The American Legion surveyed veterans about medical cannabis last summer, finding more than 80 percent of veterans and veteran households favored legal medicinal use and said they would want it as an option. The survey also indicated that 22% of veterans are currently using cannabis as a treatment, with the most prevalent conditions being chronic pain and PTSD.

“I applaud the VA in taking this bold move toward treating veterans and also fulfilling resolutions passed by The American Legion,” said Denise Rohan, National Commander of the American Legion (pictured). “We do not support recreational use of drugs, but we do think the medicinal possibilities of cannabis should not be ignored by the VA. We are all about putting the health of veterans first.”

Veterans are twice as likely to succumb to accidental opioid overdose than non-veterans. Medical cannabis is effective as a substitute or adjunct to opioids.
 

arminius

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Can't toke any more - turn white as a sheet & have to lie down for a couple hours! (Well, with my prescribed daily opioid & valium intake...adds a little too much!)
Medical cannabis is effective as a substitute or adjunct to opioids.
Cannabis works as an amplifier. If you take it concurrently with opioids it will amplify the effect of the opioids. I've known lots of folks who have successfully kicked opioids with the use and help of cannabis, by slowly reducing their use of opioids while on cannabis. It works. And the folks are universally tired of pharmaceuticals and the side effect profiles associated with opioids. Having a normal BM every day is a powerful incentive, but worse I believe opioids subtly alter, worsen, societal inhibitions, specially in folks who are already somewhat compromised in that department (many), and leads mainly to behavior that ends them in prison.
 

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Jeff Sessions’ Marijuana Adviser Wants Doctors to Drug-Test Everyone

The Daily Beast

Christopher Moraff
4 hrs ago




A top adviser on marijuana policy to Attorney General Jeff Sessions wants to see doctors make drug testing a routine part of primary care medicine and force some users into treatment against their will, he told The Daily Beast.

Dr. Robert DuPont was among a small group of drug policy experts invited to a closed-door meeting with Sessions last month to discuss federal options for dealing with the rapid liberalization of state marijuana laws. California became the sixth state to allow the sale of marijuana for recreational use on Jan. 1.

DuPont, 81, is one of the most influential drug warriors of the past century. He began his career as a liberal on drug control in the 1970s, calling then for the decriminalization of marijuana possession and launching the first U.S. methadone treatment program for heroin in Washington, D.C. in 1971. By the 1980s, he shifted to the right, popularizing the claim marijuana was a “gateway drug.”

At the Dec. 2017 meeting with Sessions, DuPont was slated to present on “the effect of marijuana on drugged driving,” a topic on which he has proposed some radical ideas.

A national model bill he helped write in 2010 called on law enforcement to test anyone stopped for suspicion of driving under the influence for all controlled substances, and arresting them if any trace at all shows up in their system—regardless of the amount. While the bill includes an exemption for drivers who consumed a drug pursuant to a prescription, it would not apply to medicinal marijuana users since doctors are not currently allowed to prescribe pot, only offer a recommendation for its use.

The bill’s language makes clear that these people will still face sanction even if they live in a state where medical marijuana is legal.

“[The] fact that any person charged with violating this subsection is or was legally entitled to consume alcohol or to use a controlled substance, medication, drug or other impairing substance, shall not constitute a defense against any charge,” it reads.

But even that’s not the worst of it.


The bill includes a section prohibiting the “Internal Possession of Chemical or Controlled Substances.”

“Any person who provides a bodily fluid sample containing any amount of a chemical or controlled substance...commits an offense punishable in the same manner as if the person otherwise possessed that substance,” it reads, adding in a footnote: “This provision is not a DUI specific law. Rather, it applies to any person who tests positive for chemical or controlled substances.”

Asked to comment on whether Sessions was aware of DuPont’s proposal to penalize drug users who may not even be under the influence behind the wheel, and if he supports it, a Justice Department spokesperson chose to focus on the dangers of driving while intoxicated.

"The Controlled Substances Act was enacted by Congress to comprehensively restrict and regulate numerous drugs, including marijuana,” said DOJ Spokeswoman Lauren Ehrsam, in a statement provided to The Daily Beast. “Further, the Attorney General agrees with the Center for Disease Control that driving while impaired by marijuana is dangerous as it negatively affects a number of skills required for safe driving.”

‘Futile’ for Addicts to Help Themselves

On closer inspection, DuPont’s proposal is part of a plan to expand the use of drug testing technology to root out users, and the threat of prosecution to compel them into treatment where they will be tested even more.

Early last year, The Daily Beast conducted a lengthy interview with DuPont as he was shopping around a radical proposal to address America’s festering overdose crisis called the “New Paradigm for Long-Term Recovery.” It would include a massive expansion of drug testing in addiction medicine.

“Drug testing is the technology of addiction medicine, but it’s under-utilized,” he said. “We want [drug screens] to be routine in all medicine. The health care sector in general should approach addiction in the same way as diabetes, and that includes monitoring. Doctors already check for things like cholesterol and blood sugar, why not test for illicit drugs?”

Calling his platform “the opposite of harm reduction,” DuPont said the goal of his plan is to promote “long-term results...and greater accountability” in the treatment sector.

Among other things he proposed giving doctors the authority to compel suspected substance abusers into treatment against their will. Once in treatment, patients could face up to five years of monitoring, including random drug tests.

“People don't understand that referral to treatment is futile for an addict on their own,” DuPont told The Daily Beast. “Right now the public really thinks that if we provide treatment the addicts will come and get well...that's not true. So let's use the leverage of the criminal justice system, that’s what the programs in the New Paradigm want to do.”

Turning a Profit Off Drug Testing

DuPont presents his proposal as evidence-based, but it’s hard to separate his strong promotion of drug testing from his close personal and financial connections to the drug testing industry.

In the 1970s he was the nation’s drug czar under Nixon and Ford, and was the first Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, until his increasingly radical views (he called for drug testing all parolees and sending them back to prison if they failed) forced his resignation in 1978.

After leaving federal service, DuPont joined the former head of the Drug Enforcement Administration, Pete Bensinger, to cash in on urine testing. The firm they founded, Bensinger, DuPont & Associates, provided drug testing services to some of America’s largest corporations.

In 1991, while running the firm, DuPont introduced the idea of mandatory drug testing for welfare recipients in a policy document published by the Heritage Foundation. DuPont recommended “not only testing the adults on public assistance but also their children.”

Later that decade, DuPont co-authored research with the founder of a firm called Psychemedics promoting the company’s new hair testing technology.

In 2000, while he was a shareholder and a paid consultant for the company DuPont testified before a Food & Drug Administration panel on drug testing where he advocated for expanding hair testing into federal workplaces. Dismissing the appearance of a “conflict of interest” DuPont told the panel: “I don't think of myself as an employee or an advocate particularly for Psychemedics, but for drug testing generally.”

The FDA approved the company’s first hair follicle test two years later, and today Psychemedics is a multi-million dollar a year business that's in the process of a profitable expansion into South America.

This is a running theme for DuPont. For instance, Stephen Talpins, an attorney who helped DuPont author his model drugged driving bill, formerly was a vice president at Alcohol Monitoring Systems, Inc., which makes the SCRAM alcohol and location monitoring system used by many courts.

Now DuPont is listed as a scientific adviser on the website of global drug-testing startup called CAM International Ventures. That company was founded in 2013 by David Martin, former president of the Drug & Alcohol Testing Industry Association, and includes among its staff other prominent members of the drug testing industry.

Still, DuPont rejects the idea that there is any financial motivation behind his fixation drug testing.

“I find it bizarre to think that my interests after all these years were financial,” he told The Daily Beast. “I just think, there is a financial incentive in drug testing, but the reason I’m interested in drug testing is that there is an interest from the disease standpoint.”

With a dozen more states expected to consider legal marijuana measures in 2018, and even Republican lawmakers like Trey Gowdy questioning the federal government’s hard stance on the drug, it’s unlikely even a die hard anti-pot crusader like DuPont can turn back the tide, but that doesn’t mean he can’t make a few more bucks trying.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/j...ants-doctors-to-drug-test-everyone/ar-BBHO09v
 

searcher

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Attorney General Jeff Sessions takes aim at legalized marijuana

New York Daily News

Jessica Schladebeck
36 mins ago


Attorney General Jeff Sessions is taking aim at legalized marijuana, according to an Associated Press report.

Sessions is expected Thursday to announce his intentions to repeal a 2013 Obama-era policy that's protected legalized marijuana from federal intervention, according to two sources with direct knowledge of the decision.

The policy change would allow for each state's U.S. attorneys to decide whether to aggressively enforce the federal marijuana law —even if the substance has already been made legal in their state, according to the sources, who spoke to the AP on the condition of anonymity.

The Obama Administration in what's been dubbed the "Cole Memo," announced it would not prevent states from legalizing marijuana as long as the substance is kept away from minors and criminals. The memo, authored by then-Deputy Attorney General James Cole, also required officials to prevent it from reaching places where it was still illegal.

Marijuana has since been legalized in eight states and the District of Columbia for recreational use, and the weed business has bloomed into a booming multimillion-dollar industry.

The move by President Donald Trump's attorney general comes just days after California began selling recreational marijuana, which has been legal in Colorado since 2014.

California's sales revenues alone expected to rake in $1 billion annually in revenue in the coming years.

In October apollfound that 64% of Americans support legalizing marijuana, with both political parties mostly in favor.

Sessions, a vocal critic of marijuana, has been expected to crack down on federal enforcement. In November he hinted at repealing the memo, telling reporters there would likely be changes to the Obama-era guidelines.

"It's my view that the use of marijuana is detrimental and we should not give encouragement in any way to it, and it represents a federal violation, which is law and is subject to be enforced," he told The Sacramento Bee at the time.

He's previously blamed the substance for spikes in violence and has compared it to heroin.

With News Wire Services

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/a...alized-marijuana/ar-BBHRo7X?OCID=ansmsnnews11
 

searcher

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Pot industry frets, then shrugs off Sessions' new policy


Associated Press
By PAUL ELIAS, Associated Press
9 hrs ago




SAN FRANCISCO — This week's announcement that the U.S. Justice Department was ditching its hands-off approach to states that have legalized marijuana initially sent some in the industry into a tailspin, just days after California's $7 billion recreational weed market opened for business.

But for long-term pot purveyors accustomed to changing regulatory winds, the decision was just another bump in a long and winding road to proving their business legitimacy.

Many in the industry said they're keeping a wait-and-see attitude because the effect of Attorney General Jeff Sessions' announcement depends on whether federal prosecutors crack down on marijuana businesses operating legally under state laws. Sessions provided no details other than saying individual U.S. attorneys are authorized to prosecute marijuana operators as they choose.

Stocks of publicly traded marijuana-related companies plunged Thursday after Sessions announced the Justice Department's new policy. On Friday, though, many of those stocks recovered.

"The announcement was largely symbolic," said Patrick Moen, general counsel of Privateer Holdings, a Seattle-based venture capital firm that invests in marijuana businesses. "This kind of stunt will not have a substantial effect on the industry."

Moen noted Sessions' action doesn't change federal law, which includes a congressional provision barring authorities from spending federal money to prosecute medical marijuana operations that abide by state laws.

He conceded that the action would have a "near-term chilling effect" on the industry's lobbying effort to compel banks and insurance companies to accept its business. Banks and insurance companies refuse to do business with cannabis companies because marijuana is illegal under federal law and most financial institutions are federally insured, forcing marijuana businesses to operate in cash.

Most of Seattle-based Privateer's $150 million in investments are in companies based outside the United States, and Moen conceded that Sessions' action Thursday would keep it that way for the short term because of regulatory uncertainty in the United States. Online news and marijuana information site Leafly is the firm's biggest U.S. investment.

In San Francisco, a city long known for embracing weed, sales of recreational marijuana began Saturday as planned. Six pot shops confirmed they were selling recreational marijuana Saturday after receiving their state licenses the day before.

Shabnam Malek, a 44-year-old lawyer and mother of three, waited in line for a half hour for Apothecarium to open its doors in San Francisco.

She marveled at the difference between buying a legal bag of weed from the times in her 20s when she was buying marijuana on the streets, a situation she said exposed her to contaminated products and unsafe situations.

She said she thinks Sessions' announcement will backfire on him.

"If anything I feel more galvanized," she said. "I think he's going to see a lot of us come out and be even more vocal about our support for legal cannabis."

Sessions' action also was on the mind of Kevin Johnson, director of operations at Grass Roots, which also opened its doors for recreational pot in San Francisco on Saturday.

"It's certainly a concern," Johnson said. "It may be more difficult for us to do proper banking but when we opened up, George W. Bush was president and the DEA was doing raids on dispensaries. We're in this for the long haul."

Grass Roots opened 13 years ago to sell medical marijuana.

In Colorado, CEO Andy Williams said the announcement that he's open to prosecution could turn years of work and millions of dollars of investment in his store Medicine Man Denver into a criminal enterprise. He said Sessions' action goes against the will of Colorado voters, who legalized marijuana in 2014.

"Any action by the attorney general goes against the public sentiment," he said. "I don't think it's a smart move. Of course, we haven't seen what it is yet, so we'll wait and see."

The share price of Medicine Man dropped nearly 40 percent Thursday, from $3.18 to $2.11. The stock closed up Friday at $2.28 a share.

Colorado's U.S. attorney, Bob Troyer, said his office won't change its approach to prosecution, despite Sessions' guidance. Prosecutors there have always focused on marijuana crimes that "create the greatest safety threats" and will continue to be guided by that, he said.

Don Morse, director of the Oregon Cannabis Business Council, said he expects "business as usual" in Oregon's marijuana industry despite Sessions' policy.

The U.S. Attorney for Oregon, Billy J. Williams, indicated he would maintain the same level of enforcement with state and local authorities by focusing on unlicensed production of marijuana and smuggling to other states.

"Legal marijuana has become so entrenched in the U.S. — it's a multibillion-dollar industry — and I don't see the people who are behind this, people like myself, rolling over for the Justice Department, which means Congress will have to act," Morse said. He said Congress should declassify marijuana as a Schedule 1 dangerous drug.

Morse said he believes the same federal provision that bars prosecution of medicinal marijuana operators also protects the recreational side to some extent, because "it is difficult to distinguish one from the other."

Cannabinniers, a San Diego maker of marijuana-infused food and drink also expects slower investor interest in the short term.

"At this point, we have no details about what the attorney general plans to do or what is going to happen, but regardless this is going to slow down investment in one of the fastest-growing industries," said Jeffrey Paul, vice president of sales for Cannabinniers.

___

Associated Press writers Peter Banda in Denver, Andrew Selsky in Portland, Oregon, and Amanda Lee Myers in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/po...ns-new-policy/ar-BBHWEE5?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=iehp
 

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Web Only / Features » January 5, 2018
The War on Drugs Is an Abject Failure. Jeff Sessions Just Ramped It Up.

The tide is finally turning against marijuana criminalization. But Sessions just took a giant leap backwards.

BY Jesse Mechanic
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The U.S. tide is clearly turning in favor of marijuana decriminalization. Twenty-nine states and Washington, D.C. have legalized medical marijuana. On January 1, California joined Alaska, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon and Washington in legalizing the sale of recreational pot. A Gallup poll completed in October found that, for the first time, a majority of Republicans (51 percent) support legalizing pot, while 64 percent of Americans overall support legalization. As Arcview Market Research noted, marijuana sales rose 33 percent from 2016 to 2017. The trend is obvious: The prohibition of pot, and the draconian laws that define the war on drugs, are wildly unpopular.

However, the shift in public opinion has not stopped Attorney General Jeff Sessions. His mission to revive and pump steroids into the war on drugs has continued unabated.

Back in May, Sessions released a memo directing federal prosecutors to once again seek the harshest sentences possible under the law. The memo rescinded Obama-era directives that were designed to lighten sentences for low-level drug crimes by stepping away from mandatory minimum sentencing. Such directives comprised a key component of the Obama administration's efforts to reverse some the severely punitive actions of his predecessors.

In June, Jeff Sessions sent a letter to congressional leaders stating his opposition to the Rohrabacher-Farr amendment (also known as the Rohrabacher-Blumenauer amendment), which was implemented to protect legalized medical marijuana programs.

On January 4, Sessions went yet another step further by rescinding a series of Obama-era memos that ushered in the wave of marijuana legalization by directing federal prosecutors not to intervene in states that legalized pot. While marijuana’s federal status as an illegal, controlled substance never changed, these memos essentially let the states govern themselves in this realm. Now, however, the status of medical and recreational legalization may be in peril, as the federal government is again free to raid state-approved clinics and dispensaries.

So much for states' rights.

None of these developments should be surprising, given that Sessions once said that “good people don't smoke marijuana,” and that marijuana was “only slightly less awful” than heroin. He also said the relaxing of drug laws was one of Obama's “great failures,” before praising Nancy Reagan's “Just Say No” campaign, which was an abject failure. And Sessions' troubling history on race cannot be ignored either, as it is part-and-parcel to his overall ideology. He was denied a federal judgeship in 1986 for a series of racist comments which including calling the NAACP “un-American” and calling a civil rights lawyer a “disgrace to his race.”

The war on drugs, any way you spin it, has been a colossal, trillion-dollar catastrophe. The punitive measures taken under every president from Nixon through George W. Bush have been entirely unsuccessful in curbing drug use and sales. They have however been successful in destroying communities of color, bolstering the cycle of poverty and helping to give the United States the highest incarceration rate in the world.

Our criminal legal system is not equally applied; it has always targeted people of color. Research by the Herald Tribune found that Black people in Florida received far longer sentences than white people with identical charges and criminal records. Department of Justice investigations found that the Chicago and Baltimore police departments routinely violated civil rights laws by unfairly targeting African Americans and Latinos. And there was the obscene 100:1 crack-to-cocaine sentencing ratio (the law until 2010; its now 18:1), which led to thousands of Black people being sent to prison for exorbitant sentences, while white people convicted of cocaine possession enjoyed far greater leniency. Crack and cocaine are the same drug, but crack was generally used by poor Black people, and cocaine was generally used by middle to upper-class whites.

As the Prison Policy Initiative reported, of the more than 2.3 million people currently incarcerated in the United States, approximately one in five is currently locked up for a drug offense. Moreover, the drug war has served to demonize people with addictions by pushing them to the fringes of society

We are currently in the midst of a drug epidemic, with at least 66,324 people killed of drug overdoses between May 2016 and May 2017. The impact is so severe that it caused the life expectancy in the United States to drop in 2015 and 2016. A cursory examination of recent history and data clearly shows that drug addition will not be solved through fist-pounding law and order. Instead of locking people up, we need to expand medication-assisted treatment, destigmatize addiction and drug use and address the highly deceptive maneuvers of big pharma.

Expanding access to medical marijuana is a critical part of the solution. Some research has shown that marijuana is highly effective in combating chronic pain, and it is not nearly addictive as opioids.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is aggressively sending the country in the wrong direction. If he continues along this path, our prison population will continue to rise, people with addictions will continue to be cast out from society and the opioid epidemic will grow even more deadly. The seriousness of these actions cannot be overstated: Our prison system is an international disgrace, and it's directly tied to the drug war.

http://inthesetimes.com/article/208...ack-Obama-Donald-Trump-prisons-incarceration/
 
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birddog

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It seems to me that Trump is forcing congress to deal with the archaic drug laws. If Sessions says he is going to go after the states, it will cause an uproar and legislation will be submitted to legalize it nationally.

I think Trump is a master at manipulating the masses. Everything he does is planned out to get certain results.