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US blames Iran for ‘unprecedented attack’ on world’s energy supply

Goldhedge

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Deep State attempting to foment war yet again....??



US blames Iran for ‘unprecedented attack’ on world’s energy supply

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo testifies before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, on July 25, 2018, in Washington, D.C. (Douglas Christian/Zuma Press/TNS)

SEPTEMBER 14, 2019 RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY

This article was originally published by Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty and is reprinted with permission.
U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has blamed Iran for drone attacks on Saudi Arabian oil production facilities, saying Tehran had “launched an unprecedented attack” on global energy supplies.

The oil-processing sites in eastern Saudi Arabia were targeted by drones early on September 14.

“There is no evidence the attacks came from Yemen,” Pompeo said in a Twitter post in which he also accused Iranian President Hassan Rohani and Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif of engaging in false diplomacy.


“Tehran is behind nearly 100 attacks on Saudi Arabia while Rohani and Zarif pretend to engage in diplomacy,” Pompeo said in the Twitter post.

Pompeo said that “amid all the calls for de-escalation” of tensions in the Persian Gulf region, “Iran has now launched an unprecedented attack on the world’s energy supply.”

“We call on all nations to publicly and unequivocally condemn Iran’s attacks,” he said. “The United States will work with our partners and allies to ensure that energy markets remain well supplied and Iran is held accountable for its aggression.”

The predawn attacks, which sparked large blazes at the Abqaiq and Khurais oil-processing facilities, were claimed by Iranian-backed Huthi rebels in Yemen.

The production sites are crucial to crucial to global energy supplies. The attacks came as Saudi Arabia’s state-owned oil giant, Saudi Aramco, prepares for a much-anticipated initial public offering on the stock market.

That stock market listing forms the cornerstone of a reform program proposed by Saudi Arabia’s de facto ruler, Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman, aimed at weaning the Saudi economy off its reliance on oil.

Saudi Aramco — the world’s most profitable company — describes its Abqaiq oil processing facility in Buqyaq as “the largest crude oil stabilization plant in the world.”

A Saudi-led coalition has been battling the Iranian-backed Huthi rebels since March 2015.

The September 14 attacks highlight how the increasingly advanced weaponry of the Iranian-backed Huthi rebels — from ballistic missiles to unmanned drones — poses a serious threat to oil installations in Saudi Arabia, the world’s top crude exporter.

The drone strikes drew swift condemnation from the United States, the United Nations, and Riyadh’s Gulf allies — the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, and Kuwait.

U.S. President Donald Trump offered Prince Muhammad “his support for Saudi Arabia’s self-defense,” the White House said.
That followed an earlier statement from Riyadh saying the crown prince told Trump the kingdom was “”willing and able” to respond to the attacks claimed by the Yemeni rebels.

“The United States Government is monitoring the situation and remains committed to ensuring global oil markets are stable and well supplied,” the U.S. statement said.

The September 14 attacks highlight how the increasingly advanced weaponry of the Iranian-backed Huthi rebels — from ballistic missiles to unmanned drones — poses a serious threat to oil installations in Saudi Arabia, the world’s top crude exporter.

The drone strikes drew swift condemnation from the United States, the United Nations, and Riyadh’s Gulf allies — the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, and Kuwait.

U.S. President Donald Trump offered Prince Muhammad “his support for Saudi Arabia’s self-defense,” the White House said.

That followed an earlier statement from Riyadh saying the crown prince told Trump the kingdom was “”willing and able” to respond to the attacks claimed by the Yemeni rebels.

“The United States Government is monitoring the situation and remains committed to ensuring global oil markets are stable and well supplied,” the U.S. statement said.
 

TomD

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under the follow the money theory, very possibly Iran.
 

nowon

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#3
REUTERS SOURCES SAYS SAUDI ARABIA'S RETURN TO FULL OIL SUPPLY CAPACITY AFTER ATTACKS COULD TAKE "WEEKS" NOT "DAYS" - SOURCE - Reuters
#BreakingNews
 

Mujahideen

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Saudi thought that it could bomb Yemen and support isis with impunity... they got hit in their pockets. No doubt Iran was instrumental in this attack somehow.; The Yemen country is poor as fuck.

I don’t see how saudi could possibly defend from these types of attacks. The bully just got punched in the face, it might back down.
 

anywoundedduck

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Saudi thought that it could bomb Yemen and support isis with impunity... they got hit in their pockets. No doubt Iran was instrumental in this attack somehow.; The Yemen country is poor as fuck.

I don’t see how saudi could possibly defend from these types of attacks. The bully just got punched in the face, it might back down.
Historically speaking, you are correct.
Saudis bullying to Yemen is over. Expect to go back to the status quo. Similar to Iraq and Kuwait. They would love to cut each other throats, but the minute the aggressor is threatened in kind, back to the status quo. What do they call it. Peace through strength? With one or any of these Arab States becoming one of the Nuclear Club, it could get very scary indeed.
 

Fatrat

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The country "That Must Never Be Named" profitability did it, now America will do the dirty work for them and the "Right" people will be paid...War by Way Of Deception.
 

Fatrat

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Scorpio

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I don’t see how saudi could possibly defend from these types of attacks.
a shot over the bow from someone

this demonstrates how easily damage can be created using modern tech,
no humint other than some weenie running a whiz bang vid controller,

I am not underestimating what this means,

Which countries have been actively practicing with drones in the field in real applications?
well, the US is certainly one of them, almost bragging about their use of them
 

Mujahideen

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Someone_else

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Billions spent on U.S. weapons didn’t protect Saudi Arabia’s most critical oil sites from a crippling attack
Yes, that is interesting. I think of several different stories for this.
 

Zed

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under the follow the money theory, very possibly Iran.
OK Iran then. My question is what is the risk/reward for them? I don't get what they gain and surely they risk being wiped off the map? It's just not making sense to me. Can someone explain what on earth they hope to gain?
 

Zed

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#17
note how the narrative has changed,

initially it was all about drones,

now they are actively promoting the propaganda of 'cruise missiles' being used
It kinda looks like someone wants an excuse to pop Iran and they are busy making one.
 

Zed

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#18
REUTERS SOURCES SAYS SAUDI ARABIA'S RETURN TO FULL OIL SUPPLY CAPACITY AFTER ATTACKS COULD TAKE "WEEKS" NOT "DAYS" - SOURCE - Reuters
#BreakingNews
Two months is the most realistic sounding estimate that I've heard.
 

Scorpio

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#19
all the boyz trying to jaw it down continue to perpetrate the nonsense that they are just about up to full production within a couple more days, etc.

a lot of people trying to talk this market down, and pooh pooing the damage as not that big a deal,
the world economy is slowing, lack of demand, etc etc
 

nowon

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#20
Two months is the most realistic sounding estimate that I've heard.

Also below from a SA post that makes More sense.

[Raymond James energy team says parts will need to be custom made in the U.S. and shipped over with an estimated 6 months. This is similar to repairs at US refineries that take 6-12 months to rebuild from fires. RJ says Saudi has enough storage for 12 days. So we should see the truth in two weeks when Saudi stops making deliveries. Until then, Aramco officials will tell people “all is good here, nothing to see.” Why would anyone believe them?]
 

Aurumag

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#21
Why is the US involved?

I thought we are a net exporter of crude oil now.

And why have domestic fuel prices spiked in the last few days?

Never let a good crisis go to waste!
 

nowon

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#22
More...

[ this comment from another article to remind people NOT to be gaullible:
"lol this is total bs. I can assure they will not be back at 100% by the end of the month. I am an engineer for refinery building etv. the valves alone will take 3 months to replace. I say itll be at the least 6 months, probably a year though"
The truth is that KSA cannot have a war and an IPO... while its oil reserves are likely to be way below the 190 million bar. reported in JODI (satellite images from Kayrros put them at around 100 million bar.)]
 

nowon

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#23
Why is the US involved?

I thought we are a net exporter of crude oil now.

And why have domestic fuel prices spiked in the last few dayd
If the world supply is decreased it puts demand on US oil and refined products. Stored US oil and fuel goes to the higher price market (net of transport costs).
 

madhu

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#24
If the world supply is decreased it puts demand on US oil and refined products. Stored US oil and fuel goes to the higher price market (net of transport costs).
The petrodollar also becomes more valuable overseas. Dollar denominated debt becomes difficult to repay overseas. Negative for gold and oil commodities. Also demand for oil has fallen off a cliff as deflation is taking a stranglehold in Asia (India). IL&F crisis. Air India is unable to pay for jet fuel in 6 airports in India and may run out of cash to pay employees in October, very sad. This Saudi oil shock is the last thing that will send Asian deflation crisis send the next recession world wide? Why do you think every central bank is doing endless QE. May not work as the liquidity is to prolong the zombie economy, I don’t know if this is engineered or that the central banks themselves are clueless. All kinds of QE are being tried, https://www.indiatoday.in/india-tod...us-transfer-sparked-debate-1592858-2019-08-29.

Not good for savers world wide. Throw good money away to save debt money. Eventually this deflation is negative for US economy too.
 

nowon

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#25
Agree about the scarcity of dollars overseas in making dollar loans more difficult to pay back. That would slow down rate of growth in energy demand due to reduced capex investments. I've yet to see any data saying there is a contraction in world oil demand, but the rate of growth is slowing down.

Regarding gold, negative interest rates are getting more widespread and that makes gold more attractive. QE eventually shows up ad inflation for basic needs which is also positive for precious metals. Imho
 

nickndfl

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#26
Putting it in the headline context, Iran should be worried. The Saudis need to send some of their suicide agents to fly a few planes into some buildings in Tehran.