• Same story, different day...........year ie more of the same fiat floods the world
  • There are no markets
  • "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

Warren rejects DNA test idea to prove Native American ancestry: 'Nobody is going to take that part o

edsl48

Silver Member
Silver Miner
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
1,699
Likes
2,740
#1

Lie a watha
Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., argued that her family’s claim to Native American ancestry is an indelible part of who she is — something that can never be taken away.

Warren defended herself on NBC’s “Meet the Press with Chuck Todd” Sunday morning when asked what she thought about taking an easily accessible DNA test, such as those offered by 23andMe or Ancestry, to settle the ongoing controversy over her heritage.

Rather than address that question specifically, Warren told a story about how her mother and father, born and raised in Oklahoma, met as teenagers and fell head-over-heels in love. Her father’s family was bitterly opposed to their relationship, she said, because her mother was part Native American, but the couple eloped and persevered.

“That’s the story that my brothers and I all learned from our Mom and our Dad, from our grandparents and all of our aunts and uncles. It’s a part of me, and nobody is going to take that part of me away — not ever,” Warren said.

After hearing this story, Todd returned to his initial concern: Why not do genealogical research or take a DNA test to find out her actual heritage? What’s wrong with knowing whether her family’s story was the truth?

“I do know. I know who I am. And never used it for anything, never got any benefit out of it anywhere,” she said.

Warren has many liberal admirers who wish to see her pursue the Democratic presidential nomination for the 2020 election. But she’s also been dogged by the allegation that she has claimed Native American ancestry to advance her academic career. The claim emerged as a controversy in 2012 when she successfully challenged Scott Brown’s Senate seat. But it took on new life when President Trump incorporated “Pocahontas” into his list of insults for political opponents.

On March 6, the Berkshire Eagle, a daily newspaper published in Pittsfield, Mass., published an editorial calling upon Warren to take one of the many commercially available DNA tests to settle the controversy. If the test showed Native American DNA, her claims would be vindicated, and it might even shut down Trump. If it did not, she could offer an apology to Native American tribes and anyone else offended by her claim.

“By facing the truth and taking responsibility for it, she would disarm her enemies and show potential voters that she was human and capable of mistakes, just like them,” the editorial reads. “Handled properly, it could become a testimonial to her integrity and truthfulness at a time when that quality is in short supply among the nation’s leadership.”
 

Ensoniq

Midas Member
Midas Member
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 9, 2013
Messages
6,928
Likes
11,640
Location
North Carolina
#2
B791A183-A3A3-4C8F-9583-C0132763FE47.jpeg
 

southfork

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Mother Lode
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
14,717
Likes
13,059
#3
She knows its a lie, and she used it to get special treatment posing as a minority , someone needs to file fraud charges against her, she also got caught lying about what she got paid by .gov working on the Tarp bailout and had to refile her campaign statement, MSM did not cover her lies
 

JayDubya

Platinum Bling
Platinum Bling
Joined
Apr 5, 2010
Messages
4,379
Likes
4,730
#4
Warren rejects DNA test idea to prove Native American ancestry: 'Nobody is going to take that part of me away'

https://www.yahoo.com/news/warren-r...ry-nobody-going-take-part-away-173657853.html

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., argued that her family’s claim to Native American ancestry is an indelible part of who she is — something that can never be taken away.

Warren defended herself on NBC’s “Meet the Press with Chuck Todd” Sunday morning when asked what she thought about taking an easily accessible DNA test, such as those offered by 23andMe or Ancestry, to settle the ongoing controversy over her heritage.

Rather than address that question specifically, Warren told a story about how her mother and father, born and raised in Oklahoma, met as teenagers and fell head-over-heels in love. Her father’s family was bitterly opposed to their relationship, she said, because her mother was part Native American, but the couple eloped and persevered.

“That’s the story that my brothers and I all learned from our Mom and our Dad, from our grandparents and all of our aunts and uncles. It’s a part of me, and nobody is going to take that part of me away — not ever,” Warren said.

After hearing this story, Todd returned to his initial concern: Why not do genealogical research or take a DNA test to find out her actual heritage? What’s wrong with knowing whether her family’s story was the truth?

“I do know. I know who I am. And never used it for anything, never got any benefit out of it anywhere,” she said.

Warren has many liberal admirers who wish to see her pursue the Democratic presidential nomination for the 2020 election. But she’s also been dogged by the allegation that she has claimed Native American ancestry to advance her academic career. The claim emerged as a controversy in 2012 when she successfully challenged Scott Brown’s Senate seat. But it took on new life when President Trump incorporated “Pocahontas” into his list of insults for political opponents.

On March 6, the Berkshire Eagle, a daily newspaper published in Pittsfield, Mass., published an editorial calling upon Warren to take one of the many commercially available DNA tests to settle the controversy. If the test showed Native American DNA, her claims would be vindicated, and it might even shut down Trump. If it did not, she could offer an apology to Native American tribes and anyone else offended by her claim.

“By facing the truth and taking responsibility for it, she would disarm her enemies and show potential voters that she was human and capable of mistakes, just like them,” the editorial reads. “Handled properly, it could become a testimonial to her integrity and truthfulness at a time when that quality is in short supply among the nation’s leadership.”
 

ZZZZZ

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Dec 23, 2017
Messages
988
Likes
2,275
Location
Northern Arizona
#6
I'm amazed that Sleazy Cheesie Chuckie Todd actually asked her about it.

I didn't see it , but Lizzie was on Fox News this morning too. Did that interviewer ask her about it?

If she wins the Dem nomination, El Trumpster will hound her about it day and night. She'll never get elected. Trump did it to Barry Soetoro and forced him to produce his (forged) birth certificate. And Trump wasn't even running for office back then.
.
.
 

Ensoniq

Midas Member
Midas Member
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 9, 2013
Messages
6,928
Likes
11,640
Location
North Carolina
#11
How many Law and Order episodes have we seen where they get DNA off the discarded coke can

This would be a funny reveal
 

GOLDZILLA

Harvurd Koleej Jeenyus
Midas Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2010
Messages
7,164
Likes
6,606
#12
Just scrape some of the crust off of her peace pipe. Or dust her tee pee for skin cells. Maybe her bow and arrow or rock knife that she uses to skin buffalos might also have some of her dna on it.
 

oldgaranddad

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 21, 2012
Messages
3,832
Likes
5,810
Location
On the top shelf.
#13
I'm amazed that Sleazy Cheesie Chuckie Todd actually asked her about it...
That's because he carries water for the other side of the Democratic party.
 

GOLDBRIX

God,Donald Trump,most in GIM2 I Trust. OTHERS-meh
Platinum Bling
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Apr 4, 2010
Messages
6,753
Likes
7,037
#15

southfork

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Mother Lode
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
14,717
Likes
13,059
#17


Though Warren became a hero for her pursuit of transparency, she hasn't been forthcoming.

Warren's TARP panel under scrutiny

By SCOTT WONG and JOHN BRESNAHAN

09/22/2011 04:44 AM EDT

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Elizabeth Warren became a hero of the left for her unrelenting pursuit of accountability and transparency with big banks and Wall Street firms that took billions of dollars in federal bailout money in 2008.


But when it comes to how her own bailout watchdog committee spent more than $10 million in taxpayer money, Warren has been a lot less forthcoming.

Warren, who is seeking the Democratic Senate nomination in Massachusetts to take on Republican Scott Brown, has yet to break down exactly how her congressional panel spent the money on travel expenses, meals and consultants, and the panel never revealed how much Warren was paid while she served as chairman.

The Congressional Oversight Panel, which existed for more than two years, has not yet disclosed any other staff salaries either — even though the five-member panel was created and run by Congress, where nearly every staffer salary and office expense, from plane tickets to bottled water, is publicly available.

In fact, Warren opposed GOP efforts to draft a budget for the bipartisan oversight panel, despite telling The Associated Press in 2008 that she wouldn’t buy a winter coat without a spending plan.

Warren declined to be interviewed for this story, and a spokesman for her Senate campaign insisted that the oversight panel had been transparent in its operations. However, late Wednesday night, the spokesman said Warren had reversed her position and now supports opening up all the committee records to public scrutiny.

“The Congressional Oversight Panel was responsible for overseeing hundreds of billions of dollars in TARP spending and was recognized for its strong return on investment, saving taxpayers billions of dollars,” said spokesman Kyle Sullivan. “The panel followed all reporting requirements set up by Congress and publicly disclosed its budget and spending information to Congress and in published reports.

ADVERTISING
“Now that the panel has completed its work, Elizabeth supports public access to its records.”

Warren did have to report her income from the panel on separate executive-branch disclosure forms — a total of $64,289 from 2009 to 2010 – when President Barack Obama appointed her as a special adviser to Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner. While Warren worked on the panel during the last two months of 2008, she did not report any income that year because she was paid in 2009, Sullivan said Thursday.

Still, members of the public would not be able to find her panel salary unless they cross-referenced it with her executive disclosures, which are available through the U.S. Office of Government Ethics.

Under the Troubled Asset Relief Program law, members of the oversight panel were paid for each day they worked at the same salary as a Cabinet secretary, roughly $200,000 a year, though the number of days they worked has not been disclosed. And panel members could hire and pay staffers whatever salary they deemed appropriate.

Warren stepped down from the oversight panel in September 2010 to help launch the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. But Obama passed her over for the permanent director job when it became clear Republicans would block her Senate confirmation.

The COP, designed to oversee the $700 billion TARP, was disbanded this past March as the financial bailout effort wound down.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Continue Reading »
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
This article tagged under:
Missing out on the latest scoops? Sign up for POLITICO Playbook and get the latest news, every morning — in your inbox.

Show Comments
 

southfork

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Mother Lode
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
14,717
Likes
13,059
#18
Politics & Policy
Elizabeth Warren, Progressive Fraud
By David French


November 28, 2017 8:50 PM

Senator Warren at a BlueGreen Alliance Foundation conference in 2015. (Reuters photo: Yuri Gripas)
The desire to lionize those Donald Trump attacks shouldn’t blind anyone to the great Warren con.

My favorite Elizabeth Warren story involves a cookbook. Warren, who was at that time posing as a trailblazing Cherokee, actually contributed recipes to a recipe book with the name, I kid you not, “Pow Wow Chow.” But here’s the best part of the story. She plagiarized some of the recipes. Yes indeed, her version of “pow wow chow” came directly from a famous French chef.

My second-favorite Warren story involves breastfeeding. She once claimed to be the first “nursing mother” to take the New Jersey bar exam, making her, I suppose, the Jackie Robinson of lactating lawyers. The problem? There’s no evidence this is true. Women have been taking the New Jersey bar since 1895, and the New Jersey Judiciary was “not aware” whether they tracked the nursing habits of test-takers.

Warren is a bit of an academic grifter. She’s willing to fake her way to the top. When she came to Harvard Law School, she was — believe it or not — considered by some to be a “minority hire.” She listed herself as a minority on a legal directory reviewed by deans and hiring committees. The University of Pennsylvania “listed her as a minority faculty member,” and she was touted after her hire at Harvard Law School as, yes, the school’s “first woman of color.”

This was no small thing. At the time, elite universities were under immense pressure to diversify their faculties (as they still are). “More women” was one command. “More women of color” was the ideal. At Harvard the pressure was so intense that students occupied the administration building, and the open spaces of the school were often filled with screaming, chanting students. One of the law school’s leading black academics, a professor named Derek Bell, left the school to protest the lack of diversity on campus.

I remember it vividly. I was there. I arrived on campus in the fall of 1991, just after Bell left, and liberal activists were seething with outrage. They were demanding new hires, and the place almost boiled over when the school granted tenure to four white men. My classmate, Hans Bader, notes that the school wasn’t just under political pressure to make a “diversity” hire, it was under legal pressure as well. The Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination had issued a “probable cause finding” that the school had discriminated against a professor named Clare Dalton when it denied her tenure. In Bader’s words, “Harvard’s faculty badly wanted to racially and sexually diversify their ranks to show their commitment to diversity, so that MCAD would not view future denials of tenure to unqualified minorities and women as being motivated by a discriminatory animus.”

No one can know whether Warren would have landed at Harvard without faking her ethnicity (Harvard of course denies her alleged minority status was a factor), but we do know that she spent years holding herself out as a Native American. We do know those claims were extremely dubious. We also know that she made those claims exactly at the time when they could most help a young career.


These facts would be bad enough, but the great Warren con doesn’t end there. Let’s take, for example, her signature work of academic scholarship. She made a name for herself in the pre-Obamacare years with a pair of studies claiming that medical bills were responsible for an extraordinary share of American bankruptcies. This research presented the Left with an ideal talking point. The American medical system wasn’t just broken, it was oppressing the little guy.

No doubt medical bills do drive some bankruptcies, but you wouldn’t know how many from Warren’s scholarship. As Megan McArdle points out in a detailed take-down in The Atlantic, Warren and her co-authors not only classified a “medical bankruptcy” as any bankruptcy that included at least $1,000 in medical debt (in her 2001 paper) or $5,000 (in her 2007 paper), their methodology was “quite explicitly designed to capture every case where medical bills, or medical loss of income, coexist with some other causal factor — but the medical issues are then always designated as causal in their discussion.”

Warren’s work even obscured the fact that medical bankruptcies fell dramatically between 2001 and 2007. McArdle noted, “This is, to put it mildly, sort of a problem for the thesis that exploding medical bills are shoving people into bankruptcy.”

McArdle’s conclusion was devastating:

Does this persistent tendency to choose odd metrics that inflate the case for some left wing cause matter? If Warren worked at a think tank, you’d say, “Ah, well, that’s the genre.” On the other hand, you’d also tend to regard her stuff with a rather beady eye. It’s unlikely to have been splashed across the headline of every newspaper in the United States. Her work gets so much attention because it comes from a Harvard professor. And this isn’t Harvard caliber material — not even Harvard undergraduate.


It’s a neat trick Warren’s accomplished. She’s likely leveraged her fictional Native American heritage into a plum spot at Harvard Law School. She leveraged her Harvard job to foist garbage scholarship on a gullible media. And now she has leveraged all of that into a plum Senate seat, from which a multimillionaire Ivy League professor has recast herself as progressive populist heroine.

But it turns out that past ideologically convenient incompetence is a good predictor of future ideologically convenient incompetence. Her signature public achievement (aside from trash-talking Donald Trump on Twitter) is proposing and helping establish the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), an unconstitutional monstrosity that was designed to exist above and outside our nation’s system of checks and balances.

Last year, the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled that the CFPB was “unconstitutionally structured.” Its opinion was not subtle. According to the Court,

The CFPB’s concentration of enormous executive power in a single, unaccountable, unchecked Director not only departs from settled historical practice, but also poses a far greater risk of arbitrary decisionmaking and abuse of power, and a far greater threat to individual liberty, than does a multi-member independent agency.

But wait, there’s more:

In short, when measured in terms of unilateral power, the Director of the CFPB is the single most powerful official in the entire U.S. Government, other than the President. Indeed, within his jurisdiction, the Director of the CFPB can be considered even more powerful than the President. It is the Director’s view of consumer protection law that prevails over all others. In essence, the Director is the President of Consumer Finance.

The Constitution doesn’t provide for bureaucratic god-kings. The CFPB’s structure was rotten from its inception — more bad fruit from Warren’s poisonous tree.

Yesterday Donald Trump made headlines when he once again called Warren “Pocahontas.” This time in front of Navajo “code talkers” — heroic veterans of World War II. Outrage abounded, but it was disproportionate to the offense. Yes, Trump was rude, but Warren is still the primary offender here. The desire to lionize the victims of Trump’s wrath should blind no one to Elizabeth Warren’s progressive fraud.

READ MORE:
 

southfork

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Mother Lode
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
14,717
Likes
13,059
#20
WP took this story down, cant access it anymore

  1. Did Elizabeth Warren check the Native American box when she ...
    www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/fact-checker/post/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-controversy-over-elizabeth-warrens-claimed-native-american-heritage/2012/09/27/d0b7f568-08a5-11e2-a10c-fa5a255a9258_blog.html
    Sep 28, 2012 ... Warren has claimed Cherokee and Delaware Indian heritage, but the only proof so far seems to be stories she says she heard from family members as a child ... The author of the family newsletter said she didn't have documentation of the marriage-license application and she doesn't know who sent her the ...
 

GOLDBRIX

God,Donald Trump,most in GIM2 I Trust. OTHERS-meh
Platinum Bling
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Apr 4, 2010
Messages
6,753
Likes
7,037
#21
Notice Nobody asks her family AND No Family volunteers to come forward.

Things that make ya go - "Hmmm"
 

oldgaranddad

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 21, 2012
Messages
3,832
Likes
5,810
Location
On the top shelf.
#24
I heard that Warren’s DNA is already on file with the government. Like members of the military all members of Congress are required to submit DNA for mortuary identification. Just in case of some sort of attack or incident.

I guess the questions that need to be asked is (A) is that true and (B) is that information subject to FOIA requests.

I would be a real hoot if Judicial Watch got the DNA profile and found no Native American DNA or worse, some DNA she didn’t want to admit to.
 

gringott

Killed then Resurrected
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
14,762
Likes
19,118
Location
You can't get there from here.
#26
Many moons ago in Oklahoma, a papoose was told a love story, and she grew to not only be a squaw but a heap big great white mother in Washington.
 

DodgebyDave

Metal Messiah
Midas Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
7,424
Likes
6,600
#28
It's better though if 4chan gets her DNA and spreads it all around the world
 

Irons

Deep Sixed
Mother Lode
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
25,771
Likes
39,176
#29
It's better though if 4chan gets her DNA and spreads it all around the world
It's just a matter of time before someone gets a hold of it now. She will be utterly destroyed when the time is right.
In the mean time she is doing the sane people a world of good by running around like a lunatic.


.
 

D-FENZ

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Jan 24, 2011
Messages
1,689
Likes
3,539
#32
I thought that actual heritage is meaningless with the enlightened ones. As long as she identifies as a 'Native American', that's supposed to be all that matters.

Of course that begs the question- Why identify as anything if it's meaningless? Unless of course you're trying to get the free stuff from stupid white people.
 

ZZZZZ

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Dec 23, 2017
Messages
988
Likes
2,275
Location
Northern Arizona
#33
Even if (that's a big if), she is 1/32nd Cherokee and 31/32nds white albino, that qualifies her as a minority?

Only in America.
.
.
 

GOLDBRIX

God,Donald Trump,most in GIM2 I Trust. OTHERS-meh
Platinum Bling
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Apr 4, 2010
Messages
6,753
Likes
7,037
#34
Even if (that's a big if), she is 1/32nd Cherokee and 31/32nds white albino, that qualifies her as a minority?

Only in America. .
Maybe with .gov, BUT not the Native Tribes. One of my dad's grandmothers ( my Great Grand mother) was a full blood American Indian ( Cherokee ? IDK) . He had a old B/W photo of her at rest in full native garb at her wake, with family sitting in the background also in native garb, in the family home in southern Illinois.
My dad was told he would be accepted as a Native (25%), but us kids would probably not be.

One of the DNA companies TV Commercial, the face claims to be Native American but his pie chart only shows 20 Percent.
Whether the tribes adjust their qualifications over time I do not know. But I find that commercial and claim questionable.

Feel Free to OPINE
 

Someone_else

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
2,091
Likes
2,494
#35
Even if (that's a big if), she is 1/32nd Cherokee and 31/32nds white albino, that qualifies her as a minority?
Yes, of course. How many people are 1/32 Cherokee and 31/32 white? I am sure it is a truly small percentage. But if you can choose the attributes, nearly 100% of the population can claim some kind of minority status.
 

newmisty

Duppy Conqueror
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
10,975
Likes
11,178
Location
Omerica
#36
She looks like she has lots of ear wax and bad breath.
A blonde version of my Freshman HS Algebra "Teacher" Mrs. Terhune... heebee geebees!
 

GOLDBRIX

God,Donald Trump,most in GIM2 I Trust. OTHERS-meh
Platinum Bling
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Apr 4, 2010
Messages
6,753
Likes
7,037
#37

spinalcracker

On a mail train.
Silver Miner
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 1, 2010
Messages
1,303
Likes
3,538
Location
On a mail train.
#38
What Percentage Indian Do You Have to Be in Order to Be a Member of a Tribe or Nation?
50 or 25 percent blood quantum or lineal descent, every tribe has its own criteria for mandatory percentage Indian
Sonny Skyhawk • September 9, 2017

Tribal Nations are the only recognized arbiter of belonging to or being a member of a tribe. No other agency or arm of any government has that responsibility, other than the particular tribe to which a person claims to belong. Thus the issue of what percentage Indian is any individual belonging to a tribe?

Every tribe has its own membership criteria; some go on blood quantum, others on descent, but whatever the criteria for “percentage Indian” it is the tribe’s enrollment office that has final say on whether a person may be a member. Anyone can claim Indian heritage, but only the tribe can grant official membership.

The first blood quantum law for legal percentage Indian was passed in 1705 in the colony of Virginia in which laws were introduced to restrict the civil rights of Native people.

In 1924 Virginia passed the Racial Integrity Act, which required that every individual be classified as either white or black. Native Americans were erased from Virginia and U.S. history as their birth records were literally changed. The act has been lauded ‘pencil genocide.’

In 1934, due to the federal government’s Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 and the associated awarded lands, many tribes were forced to adopt their own sets of blood quantum laws.

Here is a list of some tribes that claim blood quantum / percentage Indian requirements:

(List courtesy NativeVillage.org)
50 Percent / One-Half Blood Quantum (One Parent)

Kialegee Tribal Town
Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida
Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi
St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin
White Mountain Apache Tribe, Arizona
Yomba Shoshone Tribe, Utah

25 Percent / One-Fourth Blood Quantum (One Grandparent)

Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians
Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes
Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington
Oneida Tribe of Indians, Wisconsin
Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma
Pascua Yaqui Tribe, Arizona
Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma
Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation, Kansas
Navajo Nation, Arizona, Utah and New Mexico
Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming
Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation, Arizona
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, North and South Dakota
Utu Utu Gwaitu Paiute Tribe, California
Havapai-Prescott Tribe, Arizona
United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians, Oklahoma
Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes, Montana
St. Regis Mohawk Tribe, New York, Canada

12.5 Percent / One-Eighth Blood Quantum (One Great-Grandparent)

Apache Tribe of Oklahoma
Comanche Nation Oklahoma
Delaware Nation, Oklahoma
Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon
Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma
Karuk Tribe of California
Muckleshoot Indian Tribe of the Muckleshoot Reservation, Washington
Northwestern Band of Shoshoni Nation of Utah (Washakie)
Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma
Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma
Ponca Nation, Oklahoma
Sac and Fox Nation, Oklahoma
Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska
Squaxin Island Tribe of the Squaxin Island Reservation, Washington
Suquamish Indian Tribe of the Port Madison Reservation, Washington
Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation
Upper Skagit Indian Tribe of Washington
Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco and Tawakonie)

6.25 Percent / One-Sixteenth Blood Quantum (One Great-Great-Grandparent)

Caddo Nation
Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians
Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon
Fort Sill Apache Tribe
Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma
Sac and Fox Nation, Oklahoma
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, North Carolina
Lineal Descent

Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town
Cherokee Nation
Chickasaw Nation
Choctaw Nation
Citizen Potawatomi Nation
Delaware Tribe of Indians
Eastern Shawnee Tribe
Kaw Nation
Mashantucket Pequot Tribe of Connecticut
Miami Tribe of Oklahoma
Modoc Tribe
Muscogee Creek Nation
Osage Nation
Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma
Peoria Tribe of Indians
Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma
Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan
Seminole Nation
Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma
Shawnee Tribe
Thlopthlocco Tribal Town
Tonkawa Tribe
Wyandotte Nation

Aho.

This story was originally published on January 17, 2012 as part of the Ask an NDN series and has since been updated by Vincent Schilling / @VinceSchilling.
 

ZZZZZ

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Dec 23, 2017
Messages
988
Likes
2,275
Location
Northern Arizona
#40
With the proliferation of very profitable casinos owned by Native American tribes across the country, how many tribes have tightened their 'membership" rules over the last 10-20 years?
.
.