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What’s Cracking In The Garden 2019

newmisty

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We were low 79s yesterday and tonight hitting the 20's! So I grabbed much of what was pickable today in the little garden.
IMG_20191011_105650640.jpg
 

newmisty

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Kinda/sorta weird how I start later and finish earlier, eh. Guess them extra hours of sunlight per day do pay off.
I know my bones and countenance sure appreciate it.
 

coopersmith

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It got to 17 here. Everything is dead. It will all turn brown and get dry, just right for a prairie fire.

I think well fence it and put cattle on it.

The milo is surely drying now, its dead man. A week to go. I call the jd 8820. Those kids can run the 9600's. and fix em too, and dig out the shit when they plug em because they went too fast, and didnt listen to the machine. Ill just put along, I am not interested in other peoples problems...........:blond:.

Did I mention milo is worth nothing, I hope it pays for the diesel.
 

Unca Walt

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I am thinking about firing myself before we get started, for a shit attitude.

Im not kidding.
Deary me... How many times have I done that!!

Me (thinking): "If I was paying some asshole to do this, I'd fire him... NO! If he was volunteering, I'd fire him!"
 

lumpOgold

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Today was spa day for the house plants, they all get a good soak in the sink with some liquid fertilizer. The orchids keep their blooms for over a year if I'm careful.
1570921184998.png


The succulent with the yellow flowers is called "Baby Toes" or "Fiber Optic Plant" because the photosynthetic cells are way down inside and the light goes through the clear gel. It is the first time it has ever bloomed for me after several years of just being a curiosity. I think it is native to the deserts of Namibia
1570921206524.png


The flashlights are from the other night when our electrical utility threatened to turn off the power.
 

newmisty

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Today was spa day for the house plants, they all get a good soak in the sink with some liquid fertilizer. The orchids keep their blooms for over a year if I'm careful.
View attachment 143343

The succulent with the yellow flowers is called "Baby Toes" or "Fiber Optic Plant" because the photosynthetic cells are way down inside and the light goes through the clear gel. It is the first time it has ever bloomed for me after several years of just being a curiosity. I think it is native to the deserts of Namibia
View attachment 143344

The flashlights are from the other night when our electrical utility threatened to turn off the power.
Never seen that specimen before. Wild. Looks very similar to how some mushrooms grow.
 

Lt Dan

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Chance of a frost here tonight, maybe tomorrow too.
I set my fig plants in the barn for the night.
I'll see how it looks for tomorrow night.
So far no frost yet, and no more predicted for next ten days after that.
 

Pyramid

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Garden Oct 2019 008.JPG

Subset of harvest from ~10 days ago

Garden Oct 2019 009.JPG

Some of the Squash harvest. Spaghetti squash did well, the Acorn Squash not so much...pretty small overall.

Garden Oct 2019 013.JPG

We panicked a bit with frost warnings that didn't materialize over the weekend and harvested most of our remaining produce even if it was immature, like the peppers. Letting the plants run their course, but not expecting much more other that perhaps frost-hardy stuff like spinach and brussel sprouts. Anyway, all but done here, what a wet, cool season...we did ok and grew a lot of food for ourselves and learned some lessons, that's what's most important IMHO. Good luck out there folks.
 

newmisty

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Still producing here. Tom's are pretty much dead but the peppers are going strong. Probably 15 times what is pictured
IMG_20191022_173719581.jpg
 

newmisty

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Mid-twenties are coming so I cleaned out the garden. The Lunch Box peppers did very well and got a good stash of them. Got a few green Tom's and a few cayannes and couple Japs. Overall, considering how late I planted and the health of the starts I used, I'm very happy with the overall harvest this year. Thanks again Cooper for giving me a push.

IMG_20191029_134216393.jpg
IMG_20191029_134233247.jpg
IMG_20191029_134315046.jpg
 
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Pyramid

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Installed and mulched our fall garlic, picked some fall spinach and lettuce, and dug up our remaining Brussel sprouts, here's 2 of them:

Brussel Sprouts.JPG


Yes, that is snow. Cool, wet summer; now cold, wet/snowy fall. We did pretty well overall and learned more which is arguably most important. Hope everyone else had a productive season of growing their own food as well.

Stick a fork in us, we are done for 2019. Good luck out there folks.
 

newmisty

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Installed and mulched our fall garlic, picked some fall spinach and lettuce, and dug up our remaining Brussel sprouts, here's 2 of them:

View attachment 145642

Yes, that is snow. Cool, wet summer; now cold, wet/snowy fall. We did pretty well overall and learned more which is arguably most important. Hope everyone else had a productive season of growing their own food as well.

Stick a fork in us, we are done for 2019. Good luck out there folks.
Sorry about the snow. Cool looking plants. How long will the BS's keep?
 

newmisty

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Them things could last forever and I wouldn't touch them. LOL Pretty cool seeing them like that though.
First I've seen them in that form. Never saw folding pruning shears before either. :)
 

Pyramid

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Sorry about the snow. Cool looking plants. How long will the BS's keep?
Them things could last forever and I wouldn't touch them. LOL Pretty cool seeing them like that though.
Not a big fan of BS myself. Like most fresh produce, they have a shelf/fridge life of a week or 2. We generally eat as many as we can fresh, then freeze the bulbs and generally shred/slice them to add to salads or other dishes. As part of the Brassicaceae family, they have very good nutritional value, anti-oxidents, health value etc.. why we grew several plants even though they are arguably not great in taste by themselves.
 

newmisty

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Not a big fan of BS myself. Like most fresh produce, they have a shelf/fridge life of a week or 2. We generally eat as many as we can fresh, then freeze the bulbs and generally shred/slice them to add to salads or other dishes. As part of the Brassicaceae family, they have very good nutritional value, anti-oxidents, health value etc.. why we grew several plants even though they are arguably not great in taste by themselves.
A lady I know makes them by seasoning and broiling and they're delicious. They've naver been otherwise which makes me think the preparation is key to their success.
 

spinalcracker

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The 2019 Garden was another success!....

Anytime seeds are planted and food is harvested is a victory in my book!..

Due to family issues and circumstances beyond my control , I did not get my garlic planted.

I’ve planted garlic in the spring instead of the fall and it grows just fine.

So anyway , as I bid adouei to 2019 I look forward to the 2020 Garden!...

Let the dreams begin!...



image.jpg
 

EricTheCat

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It's like you read my mind. Just today I was thinking I should start planning what seeds to start and checking inventory.

Though I had planned to plant garlic in the fall I ended up not doing so because I developed an allergy to it last summer. :rage 1

My garden was a success despite it being a tough year weather-wise (extremely wet year here).
 

spinalcracker

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It's like you read my mind. Just today I was thinking I should start planning what seeds to start and checking inventory.

Though I had planned to plant garlic in the fall I ended up not doing so because I developed an allergy to it last summer. :rage 1

My garden was a success despite it being a tough year weather-wise (extremely wet year here).

Eric , if you only knew how many times I’ve got a feeling that someone was going to call and then a minute later the phone rings...

Bummer about the garlic allergies..

Is that on all varieties , soft and hard necks?.....

It ain’t easy growing anything on this land but tumbleweeds..

And there’s a reason for that , the land looked way different out here 150 years ago when there were millions of buffalo fertilizing the prairies , naturally occurring prairie fires , in-damed rivers and streams with flowing water....

No sir , this was beautiful grasslands (why would a billion buffalo wonder around here) with millions of acres of buffalo grass , side oats gramma , little bluestem , and many more grasses....

Well we know what happened don’t we.......

140211F5-CF8F-4D4A-AA68-F3C8CC4F8FA5.jpeg
 

EricTheCat

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Bummer about the garlic allergies..

Is that on all varieties , soft and hard necks?.....

It ain’t easy growing anything on this land but tumbleweeds..
That is a very good question. I haven't tried experimenting with varieties. I did try dry vs. fresh with no noticeable difference.
It should be easy enough to test if I can find both hard and soft neck. All I would have to do is rub it on my skin and see if a burn emerges. I think we're limited to hard neck here for growing due to the cold.

Bummer about your land. Not sure why the ground here seems to work so well. I grew onion, potatoes, peppers and tomatoes right in the ground for several years without having to add anything. Even though my soil is very clay heavy and rocky. Where I have my garden it was just a spot in the "lawn", in quotes because there's probably more clover, plantain, thistle, burdock, etc. than there is grass. Only thing is the peppers definitely could have used some Epsom salt and calcium (which I learned last year). I'm on an old apple orchard.
 

Bigjon

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https://articles.mercola.com/sites/...1/farmers-footprint-regenerative-farming.aspx

STORY AT-A-GLANCE
  • The documentary “Farmer’s Footprint / Regeneration: The Beginning” highlights the failure of chemical-dependent agriculture, and how through regenerative farming, America’s farmers can build healthy soil, restore ecosystems and promote human health
  • The film features Allen Williams, Ph.D., a sixth-generation family farmer who has consulted with more than 4,200 farmers and ranchers in the U.S. on soil health, cover-cropping, livestock integration, grazing management and other regenerative agriculture practices
  • “Farmer’s Footprint” shows the story of the Breitkreutz family and how they kicked chemicals to the curb and transitioned from conventional farming to regenerative agriculture in Redwood Falls, Minnesota
  • The film features Dr. Zach Bush, a triple board-certified physician with expertise in internal medicine, endocrinology and metabolism and hospice/palliative care, who believes industrial farming is one of the main drivers of cancer and chronic disease
  • An explosion of cancer incidence in the U.S. correlates with the introduction of glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup weedkiller, on food crops
 

Aurumag

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Installed and mulched our fall garlic, picked some fall spinach and lettuce, and dug up our remaining Brussel sprouts, here's 2 of them:

View attachment 145642
....
My first job out of high school I worked on a Brussels Sprouts farm (not farming, but doing other work).

Hated the things growing up.

But now I know how to cook them; with garlic and bacon.

Awesome!
 

Lt Dan

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What I hate is buying what I thought was cabbage plants and a couple months later find that I somehow bought Brussels sprouts.

Yeah they get eaten anyway, but what I really wanted was cabbage....
 

pitw

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What I hate is buying what I thought was cabbage plants and a couple months later find that I somehow bought Brussels sprouts.

Yeah they get eaten anyway, but what I really wanted was cabbage....

LOL I never make that mistake as I don't like either.
 

spinalcracker

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Another great year!....even a bad year is ok lol..any garden is better than none!....

Closing the 2019 Thread and stay tuned for What’s Cracking v2020
 

newmisty

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Another great year!....even a bad year is ok lol..any garden is better than none!....

Closing the 2019 Thread and stay tuned for What’s Cracking v2020
Thanks for the memories!
 

glockngold

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Today I learned that my 9 year old arugula seeds sprouted in under 48 hours. So happy.
Hey VaSolvo,
use the 2020 garden thread & show some pics.
Arugula...Never heard of it
Turns out it's a thing. Obama gaffed on it.
In spite of all those obstacles, arugula persists in quiet superiority as the best tasting, most versatile, and easiest to prepare of the common greens. All it has ever done is help make things delicious: It’s great as a crunchy topping for sandwiches, piled atop a Neapolitan pizza, or as a nutritious base for a salad. It shouldn’t have to provide all that pleasant, peppery flavor just to reside in a vegetal purgatory between the broad commonality of spinach and kale’s trendy coastal dominance. The vegetable has brought more than enough to the table to earn the ubiquity it’s never had.
https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2019/03/arugula-rocks-come-at-me-spinach/585571/
 

newmisty

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newmisty

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