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What’s Cracking In The Garden 2019

newmisty

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EricTheCat

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Thanks Etc. I planted these a few years back because my youngest daughter was keeping me broke with her blueberry habit. Bought most of those off season after they had went on sale at various places. Got most of those for 5 to 8 bucks apiece.

There's a lady on Facebook yard sale site here selling these for 25 bucks a gallon. At those prices my patch will have paid for itself twice over this year alone. Crazy
When I was a kid we were up North and my mom noticed a huge wild blueberry patch. She nearly filled a gallon ice cream bucket. After we got home she made incredible blueberry pies.

I haven't researched growing blueberries here yet but it has been in the back of my mind.
 

newmisty

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When I was a kid we were up North and my mom noticed a huge wild blueberry patch. She nearly filled a gallon ice cream bucket. After we got home she made incredible blueberry pies.

I haven't researched growing blueberries here yet but it has been in the back of my mind.
Do it!
 

Unca Walt

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Well, I cain't grow nuffin but tropical shit... I DO get hundreds and hundreds of feet of volunteer passion flower vines. (I would trade them all for Spinalcracker's ability to grow volunteer :weed:in a fargin DITCH.)

Passion flowers are like Morning Glories; the are done by noon each day. But each morning, I have a coupla hunnert weird blooms that look like they come from another world. And the local Zebra butterflies cluster in fargin clouds around them:

passion flower.jpg


Zebra butterflies sorta "float" instead of flying.

 

newmisty

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My gladiolas bloomed yesterday! Last year I transplanted a couple to a front garden bed and they are looking great. This is from the mother patch I inherited directly outside the back door. This flower is so beautiful.
 

lumpOgold

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I just brought in my onions to finish drying on my deck, they dried for a week or so in the garden and now I just wait until the "necks" tighten up.
1561752552787.png


Then was clean up the grape vines to get sun and air into the developing grapes. These are Primitivo grapes, think Sangiovese or Zinfandel grapes. Just have to protect them from the birds and I'll be having a nice harvest.
1561752697734.png

1561752716892.png


Then this thing came flying by, anyone knows what it is? I thought I was going to get seriously injured when this flew by my ear! It is about 1 1/2 inches in length and sounded like a helicopter.
1561752377193.png
 

glockngold

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I've been watching this thread keeping up with everyone's garden.
It was a cold wet spring here & I had to change how I did things. (more on that later)
Anyway, things have leveled out & the garden is going gangbusters.
This year I am growing a yellow squash that is sort of like a mix with those yellow crook neck things & a zuchini.
Only you just get the neck, & if you cut them at around the 6" length they are perfect eating not tough.
Here is tonight's supper.
I fry these up cooking down in oil.
When they shrink to about 1/2 in volume & are turning brown, shut off the heat.
Shake on a good amount of lemon pepper seasoning, & some soy sauce.
Serve with some buttered quinoa or rice.
Good eatin. Takes about 30 minutes from pickin to plate.
 

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lumpOgold

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I think that wasp like insect is a Tarantula Hawk.
That makes perfect sense, we are over-run with tarantulas during different parts of the year as they migrate through town. I guess I should pay more attention and go to the Tarantula Festival some year!
 

lumpOgold

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I've been watching this thread keeping up with everyone's garden.
It was a cold wet spring here & I had to change how I did things. (more on that later)
Anyway, things have leveled out & the garden is going gangbusters.
This year I am growing a yellow squash that is sort of like a mix with those yellow crook neck things & a zuchini.
Only you just get the neck, & if you cut them at around the 6" length they are perfect eating not tough.
Here is tonight's supper.
I fry these up cooking down in oil.
When they shrink to about 1/2 in volume & are turning brown, shut off the heat.
Shake on a good amount of lemon pepper seasoning, & some soy sauce.
Serve with some buttered quinoa or rice.
Good eatin. Takes about 30 minutes from pickin to plate.
Looks delicious! I got my first chilis today, some Anaheims and Poblanos. If I can get a few eggs from the neighbor (the wife wants a chicken!) I'll have a nice asparagus and poblano frittata for weekend dining.
 

newmisty

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Then this thing came flying by, anyone knows what it is? I thought I was going to get seriously injured when this flew by my ear! It is about 1 1/2 inches in length and sounded like a helicopter.
View attachment 134923
I dunno, but he's got a cool mustache.
 

Silver

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Looks delicious! I got my first chilis today, some Anaheims and Poblanos. If I can get a few eggs from the neighbor (the wife wants a chicken!) I'll have a nice asparagus and poblano frittata for weekend dining.
You're in the Valley of Hearts Delight - they used to grow some fine crops around there.
 

newmisty

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Our first honey...I have to give the wife 100% of the credit for getting it done. It's quite a chore.


View attachment 135089

View attachment 135090
Our first honey...I have to give the wife 100% of the credit for getting it done. It's quite a chore.


View attachment 135089

View attachment 135090
That's quite a stash of antibacterial, antioxidant, antiseptic, super nutrient rich, lifelong lasting all purpose wonder food right there.
 

newmisty

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My Tiger Lilly's blossomed today:

 

newmisty

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The small Canna Lilly patch is filling out. Right after I took the picture the hummingbird came to dine. They love the red Canna's.

 

Jarrod32

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When I was a kid we were up North and my mom noticed a huge wild blueberry patch. She nearly filled a gallon ice cream bucket. After we got home she made incredible blueberry pies.

I haven't researched growing blueberries here yet but it has been in the back of my mind.
I'm in Nebraska, and have had trouble with blueberries. Raspberries, strawberries, blackberries...all fine. Blueberries don't grow for shit for me.

Of course, nothing is growing for shit me this year after the garden washed away this spring. You guys keep on rockin with the gardens. I have to enjoy gardening through you guys this year...
 

EricTheCat

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I'm in Nebraska, and have had trouble with blueberries. Raspberries, strawberries, blackberries...all fine. Blueberries don't grow for shit for me.

Of course, nothing is growing for shit me this year after the garden washed away this spring. You guys keep on rockin with the gardens. I have to enjoy gardening through you guys this year...
There's gotta be something special that blueberries need. I admit I still haven't researched them but expecting to this fall/winter when I do a lot of garden planning.

I hope your next gardening season goes better. I guess I can't complain about the endless rain we are having.

I've been wanting to do a epsom salt and calcium treatment to my peppers (to the leaves) but everything I read says to do it as a watering and well nature is watering just about every day on and on so I don't dare add more water. Might just have to put spoonfuls around the base of the plant and let them take it in by the roots. Or just hope the rich mix I made for them this year will prevail until a dry spell.
 

glockngold

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I have been weekly spraying peppers & tomatos (as well as a row of zinnias) with copper soap to fight off bacteria leaf spot. (Bonide Copper Fungicide)
This disease has changed how I see volunteers that spring up in rows of other stuff, & in the compost pile as well.
I used to till around the baby tomatoes in the corn rows just to see what they will do.
I've learned that the bacteria can overwinter in seeds & will spread by letting the volunteers live. So they have to die...

epsom salt and calcium treatment to my peppers
I never heard of this. Didn't know it was a "thing".

Eric, I found this about the epsom salt & I like what it says about increasing water retention in the pepper fruits:
After the three most important plant elements N-P-K (Nitrogen-Phosphorus-Potassium) that plants require most, Magnesium and Sulfur together with Calcium are considered as secondary essential plant elements.
Epsom salt is hydrated magnesium sulfate; it contains 10 percent Magnesium and 13 percent Sulfur. Magnesium increases water retention, helps in better intake of nutrients, and most importantly in the creation of chlorophyll. Sulfur also participates in chlorophyll development, in photosynthesis and boosts the plant’s growth and its resistance to diseases.
Being the best source of both these elements, Epsom salt for peppers is very effective. Its application reduces slow growth, makes the pepper plants healthier, lusher and greener than before (due to the boost in chlorophyll production), and induces larger and tastier fruits.

Foliar Spray
Fill a spray bottle with a gallon of water and add two tablespoons of Epsom salt, shake well. Apply the liquid directly on to the leaves, drench the foliage of your pepper plants. Substitute regular watering with this foliar spray once a month.
https://balconygardenweb.com/epsom-salt-for-peppers/
 

Lt Dan

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Eric, I found this about the epsom salt
I just mixed up a couple or three gallon of Epsom salts, about a cup of salts to the 2-3 gallon of water and just poured a little of it around the pepper plants. We've also had a lot of rain and those pepper plants looked kinda sick. I did not check the Ph of the soil, but peppers, in our soil, usually need to be fed some Epsom salts before they will come around and do much.

If all you get is rain, you could try sprinkling some around the plants and let the rain soak it in to the soil, the plants will take in what they need.
 

EricTheCat

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Thanks for the info Lt Dan and glockngold. I think I'll go with the sprinkling around method being as Sunday is the first day without rain in the forecast. Got another good solid dumping of rain this morning and a few yesterday.
 

newmisty

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Tiger lily buds are fargin delicious when fried. We lived on them in summer when I wuz a kid in The Olden Days.
I had no idea. Thanks for the info. The Canna Lilly's roots/tubers are a starchy edible. Another little fact is the variety I have are Canna Indica.
 

pitw

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I was just about to ask if the hummingbirds loved those flowers then I read your comment. Those flowers kind of remind me of my bee balm. This one keeps coming back now that it knows where to find them. 6 or so have bloomed and I have about 20 buds.

View attachment 135150

That hummer has a tude. LOL
 

newmisty

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Unca Walt

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When did you pick em? RIght before they open?
Yup. They taste like dreamy heaven. I have always loved them. Fry them in a tad of butter, and gobble. Chock full of vitamin C to boot.

I like them with peas.
 

newmisty

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Yup. They taste like dreamy heaven. I have always loved them. Fry them in a tad of butter, and gobble. Chock full of vitamin C to boot.

I like them with peas.
Preciate the tip Unca.