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What’s Cracking In The Garden 2020

gnome

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#81
Thanks for the reminder, I need to get my bunching onion (scallion) seeds sprouted!
In my climate bunching onions are perennial and can be harvested 365.
Right now they are mostly flowering.
I harvest as cut-and-come-again, rarely dig up the bulb.
If I lived in a climate with hard freezes, after my last harvest I would plant some of the bulbs in a flower box and put it on the window for fresh herbs in winter and then have a jump on season when it's time to plant out in spring.

Also, bunching onions are easily grown from leftover scraps of storebought bunching onions.
Mine came from bunches I picked up at the farmers market or korean grocery.
Much faster than growing from seed, but I guess it depends on how much you want to grow.
 

newmisty

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#84
 

newmisty

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#86

ToBeSelfEvident

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#87
I'm doing 3 kinds of tomatoes, 2 kinds of eggplant, 2 kinds of peppers and some butternut squash. I'm having to hand water because we are getting 85 - 90 degree days and no rain.

I think I will start some Seminole pumpkin seedlings and do a little stealth gardening around the neighborhood. Might come in handy later if grocery shelves are empty. There is still part of a vine growing in my neighbor's yard from a pumpkin I planted 2 years ago.
 

gnome

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#89
Tangelos, still a little on the sour side, but tasty enough that we are picking a handful a day.
They'll keep sweetening up through summer.
tangelos.jpg


This is just about the last of the stone fruit flowers for this year. Random nectarine seedling, not grafted. Should have a good harvest of nectarines, peaches and plums this summer.

nec flower.jpg


Picked these greens up at a nursery last summer. Commonly called Longevity Spinach, latin is gynura procumbens.
It's looking a little tired after the winter, but should start to really perk up now warmer temperatures are here.
It might be my favorite green in the garden, not bitter at all, tender. Eat raw or cooked. Many health benefits.
Harvest 365 days a year in SoCal.
Propagates wicked easy by cuttings, so every time I harvest some I grow new plants.

gynura procumbens.jpg
 

coopersmith

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#90
End of last week I sowed 4 seeds of fruit bowl (sweet tooth x purple maui), and they have all sprouted and are growing nicely with no issues. That is a great strike rate for the age of the seeds.

:weed:

I am stoked!
 

newmisty

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#91
End of last week I sowed 4 seeds of fruit bowl (sweet tooth x purple maui), and they have all sprouted and are growing nicely with no issues. That is a great strike rate for the age of the seeds.

:weed:

I am stoked!
How old would you say they were?
 

coopersmith

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#92
Id guess at least 10 years, the spinal cracker who is more learned on this particular breeder can probably give a better estimate.

I didnt do anything special, just popped em into jiffy pellets, hydrated w distilled water, then into a tray w dome, and onto a heat mat at 78 degrees f.

I also have a wack of skunk/haze gear from this breeder, cant wait to see if I can get em to bust.
 

pitw

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#93
6 inch's of snow and -10F temps last night says I ain't gonna be near the garden for a spell. But as we are looking after a 4 year old bundle of energy and questions the wife and him decided they would plant some Marygolds for his momma day present. As they were doing that I asked why not plant some tomatoes cause the last batch we bought started sprouting[turns one off wanting a tomater sammich].
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coopersmith

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#94
I got my baby chicks today, all alive and doing well so far, no weak ones. I have em in a heated shop, under a heat lamp, in an old stock tank the bottom rusted out of. They seem to be off to a good start.

I still need to start garden seeds. I will try to start this weekend. Still lots to do, busy times, and at times the weather doesnt cooperate.
 

coopersmith

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#95
6 inch's of snow and -10F temps last night says I ain't gonna be near the garden for a spell. But as we are looking after a 4 year old bundle of energy and questions the wife and him decided they would plant some Marygolds for his momma day present. As they were doing that I asked why not plant some tomatoes cause the last batch we bought started sprouting[turns one off wanting a tomater sammich]. View attachment 159735 View attachment 159723
Thats a mom right there, already got the dustpan and whisk broom ready.........good times!

:2 thumbs up:
 

Lt Dan

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#96
I got my baby chicks today, all alive and doing well so far, no weak ones. I have em in a heated shop, under a heat lamp, in an old stock tank the bottom rusted out of. They seem to be off to a good start.

I still need to start garden seeds. I will try to start this weekend. Still lots to do, busy times, and at times the weather doesnt cooperate.
My chicks, I bought 8 at the local Rural King store, are a couple weeks old now. Soon be time to give them a larger play pen. They're in a 4ft by 2ft box now.

Bees were looking like they were way over crowded, so I gave them a honey super today. They were really packed out in there.

Onions are up, I used sets. We got our berry plants, strawberries and blueberries weeded. I still need to give the blueberries some fertilizer to reduce the pH. Wife got in a few other early seeds, not sure what as I checked earlier and did not yet see anything peeking out of the ground.
 

Merkin

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#97
really excited to get started on this year‘s garden .

I know folks like LumpofGold are ready to plant some greens so let’s get going!

I really have to wait until April/May.

Except for all the prep work.

There is no glamour in cleaning pots , pulling weeds , or running a tiller....it’s all work , honest work.

Gardens are good for the soul.

I don’t have anything to report except that I’m starting some medicinal herbs.

I have to start early because growing cannabis from seed requires selection of males vs females and culling out the runts.

I’ll be starting 6 varietals.

Chem 91
Chem 91 x Dragon
C99 from JoeyWeed
C99 x Northern Lights
Girl Scout Cookies x G13 Hashplant 88
Winkin’ Blinkin’ Nod from Luther Schwagbank...I have to look that one up again to see what’s in it.....

Good luck this Year to ya all!...

View attachment 152317
I started prepping my garden today, unlike my gardens of the past this one will just have a few medicinal herbs, and then mostly peppers, eggplant and some toms. I have a great sun window in the barn for starters, then lots of lovely composted horse, cow and chicken poop. I'm getting excited just thinking about it..
 

gnome

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#98
Today, harvesting asian bunching onions, chard, ashitaba and thinning some of the smaller tangelos.

Also, collecting bunching onion seeds, most of which I will give away as I've got a perpetual supply of bunching onions.

20200404_113742~2.jpg


Moringa Oleifera. I have two I bought in 4 inch pots last summer, they're about 4 feet tall now.
They were dormant when I pulled them inside in January, since then they've perked up nicely.
I take them outside when it's warm and sunny. Probably transplant to the ground in a few weeks, next winter they won't have it so easy.

20200401_174900~2.jpg
 

gnome

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#99
I eat a lot of the weeds that appear in my garden. This is one I actually encourage to grow.
Chickweed aka Stellaria Media is one of the few that my wife will happily eat. Raw in salad or lightly steamed or blanched.
It tends to flourish only in winter/early spring here, but I've found I can extend the season into summer in a shady spot with semi-regular watering.


stellaria media.jpg


Ashitaba is a perennial relative of celery, and you can use it similarly. Sweeter than celery, but not quite as juicy.
Very tasty as a tempura.
Ashitaba 明日葉 means "tomorrow leaf". Because you cut one of the stems off and by tomorrow it has replaced itself.

Here in SoCal it does not die back in winter. In mild temperate climates it's a dieback perennial. Not sure how far north it can survive the winters.

Shade tolerant. Good vegetable to grow in the understory of a food forest. I only have one plant, so I'm babying it in a container.
Once I'm able to propagate or grow more from seed, I will plant under my fruit trees.

ashitaba.jpg
 

Pyramid

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Hope y’all secured all your seeds for the season. Reading that people are making runs on them, distribution and order fulfillment are backed up. This from Seed Savers:

We are temporarily not accepting new orders.
Due to a sharp increase in seed orders, we are not accepting new orders at this time. We are still shipping previously placed orders and will open ordering back up again once we catch up. For a local source of Seed Savers Exchange seeds, please visit one of our Seed Rack partners near you.
 

glockngold

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I eat a lot of the weeds that appear in my garden. This is one I actually encourage to grow.
Chickweed aka Stellaria Media is one of the few that my wife will happily eat. Raw in salad or lightly steamed or blanched.
It tends to flourish only in winter/early spring here, but I've found I can extend the season into summer in a shady spot with semi-regular watering.

View attachment 160460
gnome,
I have never eaten chickweed.
I actually tilled a mess of it under a few weeks ago. It is a stubborn weed that even the herbicide farmers can't control.
So could you school me in best practices for eating it?
Stems, leaves, & flowers all ok to eat?
Best when young, or no difference on size & age?
"Sort of tastes like.....what?"
 

Merkin

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Today, harvesting asian bunching onions, chard, ashitaba and thinning some of the smaller tangelos.

Also, collecting bunching onion seeds, most of which I will give away as I've got a perpetual supply of bunching onions.

View attachment 160370

Moringa Oleifera. I have two I bought in 4 inch pots last summer, they're about 4 feet tall now.
They were dormant when I pulled them inside in January, since then they've perked up nicely.
I take them outside when it's warm and sunny. Probably transplant to the ground in a few weeks, next winter they won't have it so easy.

View attachment 160371
LOOKING good..
 

gnome

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gnome,
I have never eaten chickweed.
I actually tilled a mess of it under a few weeks ago. It is a stubborn weed that even the herbicide farmers can't control.
So could you school me in best practices for eating it?
Stems, leaves, & flowers all ok to eat?
Best when young, or no difference on size & age?
"Sort of tastes like.....what?"
Younger is gonna be more tender, but I've never found it inedible, just a little more fibrous as it gets older.
Stems, leaves and flowers are edible.
I typically just go through a patch with scissors and cut the tips off for eating, anywhere from 2-5 inches or so, depending how tender it looks.

My 2 favorite ways to eat are:

1) Raw, in salad. Or just snack on it when I'm in the garden.

2) Lightly blanched. Less than 1 inch of water in bottom of pot, bring to a boil, add salt and toss the chickweed in, stir for just 30 seconds - take it out as soon as it has changed color to bright green. Could sprinkle with a high-quality soy sauce.

Occasionally I'll make tea from the more fibrous stems.

In Japan, where it has 1,000 year history as food, it's added to rice porridge (along with 6 other spring greens) as cleansing foods after the new years feasts.

Sort of tastes like...if I had to stretch it's kind of like a lettuce...but it's a stretch. It tastes like chickweed! Try it.

Medicinal properties: blood cleanser, reduces kidney related swelling, improves lactation. Can make into a paste and use as a compress for boils on skin or sore tooth.
 

glockngold

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Ok,
Yesterday I gave the chickweed a shot.
Because I am a pussy, I mixed in a lot of other stuff that I hoped would disguise the taste....
I used some that was crawling up the north side of the house maybe already 16" in length.
Used a scissors to cut the stems.
They chewed... kind of like straw, pretty fibrous.
Maybe next time I will try stripping the leaves & eat them only.
Going to be atleast 3 weeks till the romaine is ready to start eating... sigh...

P1010001.JPG
 

Jarrod32

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Had a nice day Friday (before the wind and the rain and a bit of snow came today), so I got out and got the first disking on the new property where our garden is going to go.

1586741877636.png


And today...with the wind and the rain outside...it was time to start some seeds...

1586741929006.png


Slowly getting closer...still a lot of work to do on the garden area, but starting to take shape.
 

Merkin

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Had a nice day Friday (before the wind and the rain and a bit of snow came today), so I got out and got the first disking on the new property where our garden is going to go.

View attachment 161521

And today...with the wind and the rain outside...it was time to start some seeds...

View attachment 161522

Slowly getting closer...still a lot of work to do on the garden area, but starting to take shape.
Looking really good....
 

dacrunch

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Just started a (mini - for 2) "Victory Garden"... next to wife's "flower garden" west of the cherry tree... (looking forward to those big sweet juicy black cherries! Already bloomed & fruit tiny green balls... May harvest.)

Rototilled the "clay" & lawn, added some purchased potting & top soil bags, rototilled again, poured a bottle of plant food.
Leveled it all off with rake then mason's aluminum plank.
Covered with black "landscape cloth". Fastened the cloth (old re-bar).

Snapped chalk lines every foot. I cut a small "cross" wherever I want to place a plant, that way I won't have to weed, and all the rain/watering will stay in the soil available for the crop, not grass (that's the plan, anyways).

Between the 1st 2 lines on the north side I planted a post at each end, attached gridded fencing wire (used - free).

Planted tomato plants on each line along the wire, spaced with basil plants (wife says they keep the bugs away).
A couple bell pepper plants at the ends.
Next row chives, leeks & onions.

Starting radishes & carrots & squash from seeds in pots...

The squash & zucchini etc will go in another spot - flower bed near the side walkway, so they can spread over the walkway.
Still have to get more soil & till that ground - and raise the walkway sidewalls to prevent soil from going into the gravel - think I'll use some of the 3' long ceramic flooring "planks" left over from the house renovation for that...
Work in progress...

Edit - ok - here's the pics... Not enough to feed a lot of people haha (late afternoon shade from the house).

uh... "
Oops! We ran into some problems.
The uploaded file is too large for the server to process.
... so I have to go to "paint" & edit, resize down to 30%... grrr...


IMG-20200415-WA0005.jpeg


IMG-20200415-WA0007.jpeg


IMG-20200415-WA0010.jpeg
 
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glockngold

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Just started a "Victory Garden"... next to wife's "flower garden" next to the cherry tree... (looking forward to those big juicy black cherries! Already bloomed & fruit tiny green balls... May harvest.)
Work in progress...
Come on.
I know you have a camera from the shot of the little woman in the hazmat suit.
Give us some pics!
 

spinalcracker

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crunch , you an engineer?...

we were in the 70’s and then snow , been taking trays in and out in and out in and out , the house.

saw my first volunteer cannabis plant of the year so spring is finally here , although it could snow at the drop of a hat

its still early but we still get stoked and usually plant to early and,kill a lot of stuff but hey , it’s only gardening and not brain surgery

if we have any extra tomato or pepper plants we usually sell them locally for a couple dollars a plant...


B293B562-81E8-49AB-B60F-DF0750DF0F2C.jpeg
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dacrunch

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Come on.
I know you have a camera from the shot of the little woman in the hazmat suit.
Give us some pics!
Okay - added them above...
Typical suburban provincial French back yard...
 

dacrunch

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crunch , you an engineer?...
Nope... Retired Pipe Fitter / Plumber... (language teacher, translator, interpreter before that)... Also "jack of all trades" (buy the tools for the cost of hiring out the 1st job, learn how to do it, and keep the tools for the next job... Also helps when there's no work in your trade...)

Never grew any weed, but sure burned a lot of it in my day... Can't handle it any more, I turn white as a sheet and have to lie down...

Edit - past 2 winters I've lived here, not a flake of snow. A few nights below freezing... but not by much. Roses bloomed all winter.
 
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pitw

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By golly we are in the game. Started 48 tomatoes, 5 peppers and some strawberry's this morning. Gonna start some hemp tomorrow and the wife won't be helping with that at all. Gonna be using all my own hemp seeds this year as the experimenting with seeds from a catalogue just didn't go well at all. I think them seeds were all for indoor and lights as they never did produce a flower. My outdoor stuff is at least 25 years old and I've done a fair bit of selective management over the years to get a decent smoke that don't stink to high heaven while giving me what I like for an after taste[so to speak].
 

EricTheCat

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I can't grow some of the finer stuff you guys grow, but some of my pepper and tomato seedlings have started to emerge.

Also my cucumber seeds have sprouted. This will be my first year doing cucumbers (hopefully), last year mice dug them out because I had them in the basement and I didn't getting around to starting them again after that. I am wondering if I should have used a larger than 4" container (for est. 1 month growth from now), the cucumber seedlings are growing very fast!

Cucumbers-2020-04-15-Img_3091SS.jpg


Cherry tomato seedling just starting to emerge.
Tomato-2020-04-15-Img_3093SS.jpg
 

EricTheCat

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Ain't never started a cucumber any where but the garden. Will be fun to see what yours do.
I thought about direct sowing them. Then I was watching a video from migardener and he had some in containers he was planting so I thought maybe it worth getting an early start. You are further North so if that's been working well for you that gives me another option if something goes wrong with the starts I have.
 

pitw

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Eric, two years ago we had the latest planting I can remember. I figured the cukes didn't stand a chance and man was I wrong. Them buggers grew like crazy and produced sooo many cumbers the wife made more pickles, relish and others than ever, plus she gave away 5 gallon buckets to the neighbors. It was like the plant knew to speed grow.
 

coopersmith

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A cucumber is 60 days to fruit, give or take. I like to put seeds in the ground when the soil is warm, they fly out of the soil. They like heat, id imagine they might get rootbound and stunt in a starter pot, if held for very long.

Outdoors I garden by soil temps. At 70 degrees its time to plant cucurbits (squash, melons, cukes).
 

EricTheCat

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When you put those cukes in the ground you ought to plant a few cuke seeds near them, and find out for yourself.

It would be fun to see a side by side.
Funny you mention that. I was just thinking I should try a side by side. I could even start another in a larger container, haven't decided if I will.

Eric, two years ago we had the latest planting I can remember. I figured the cukes didn't stand a chance and man was I wrong. Them buggers grew like crazy and produced sooo many cumbers the wife made more pickles, relish and others than ever, plus she gave away 5 gallon buckets to the neighbors. It was like the plant knew to speed grow.
Good to know. I love cukes. I don't know why it's taken me this long to seriously think about growing them. Planning to do green beans as well this year. That will be another first for me.

One of my snow peas has started to sprout today in the garden. Good eats on the way.
 

spinalcracker

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we grew these 4 yrs ago and I don’t know why I don’t give them another run , they were delicious




Growing Lemon Cucumbers in the Home Garden

The look of lemons meets the crunch of cucumbers: Lemon cucumbers might be confused about what they are, but their novel appearance and sweet, crispy flesh make a combination many gardeners find difficult to resist. If you’re among them, read on to learn all about growing these unique heirlooms in your cucumber patch.

Lemon Cucumber Origin

While there’s a debate about where lemon cukes actually originated, many sources think they came from India. Others suggest that they were introduced in the Middle-East during the 1500s and arrived in the United States and the late 19th or early 20th century.

Lemon Cucumber Differences

Spherical, lemon- and white-striped fruit isn’t the only thing separating lemon cucumbers from their more conventional relatives. Other major differences include:

Cool weather tolerance. Most cukes seeds won’t germinate with a soil temperature less than 65°F (18.3°C). Lemon cukes seeds germinate at 55°F (12.8° C). In most parts of the U.S., they can be planted between mid- and late May.
Low cucurbitacin content. This makes the plants much less likely to attract cucumber beetles or produce bitter fruit.
Especially long vines. As vigorous growers, lemon cucumbers need the support of tall trellises. Install them at planting to avoid harming the cukes’ root systems.

683115B4-E423-404B-811C-DB657FF782EE.jpeg