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What’s Cracking In The Garden 2022

newmisty

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Want to trade for turkey poults, chicks, guinea keets, ducklings.. (Powell)​

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Trying to find someone who would be interested in making a trade for a few turkey poults or even a grown pair, some chicks, ducklings, keets. I have blackberry plants to trade, some Mexican silver coins, an acoustic guitar, Japanese Pokémon cards, some laying hens..
 

gnome

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newmisty

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Thought this was pretty cool.

horjd305_outdoor-stairs-retaining-wall_s4x3.jpg.rend.hgtvcom.1280.960.jpeg
 

newmisty

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"I used stinging nettle all my life. Back in Romania, the plant is well recognized for its health benefits. We used it as a puree and as a replacement for spinach. Also, we were told the stings have medicinal benefits for rheumatism. Still eating and enjoying it in Michigan."

"My German Grandmother once told me that during WW2, they pretty much lived off of nettle; that, and the occasional rabbit. Food was scarce and this plant was in abundance. She had a great sense of humor and called it the bunker diet. I absolutely love walking through a patch any time my arthritis acts up. The chemicals in the "needles" helps to numb the afflicted areas. That was a practice I learned from the Native American folk. It truly is an amazing plant."

"Here in Denmark they are called “brændenælder” (“burning nettles”). We have breakfast products with dried burning nettle leaves in them (krudtuglegrød). The fibres in the stems can be/ have been used to make clothes (by hand, you can make a cord strong enough to be used for fishing).
If you ferment the leaves and stems in a barrel of water, you get a very potent, though not nice smelling, fertilizer, called “ajle”. Nice channel. Keep up the good work"

"My grandpa used to make false manure from tons of fermented stinging nettle, it smelled horrible but plants grew amazing when watered with solution"



 
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gnome

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Thought this was pretty cool.

horjd305_outdoor-stairs-retaining-wall_s4x3.jpg.rend.hgtvcom.1280.960.jpeg
Our neighbor is building a retaining wall along the property line, giving me the excuse to redesign garden beds along that wall and this gives me some good ideas.

Also, that looks like a coral bark Japanese Maple upper left, pretty in every season.
 

Cigarlover

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"I used stinging nettle all my life. Back in Romania, the plant is well recognized for its health benefits. We used it as a puree and as a replacement for spinach. Also, we were told the stings have medicinal benefits for rheumatism. Still eating and enjoying it in Michigan."

"My German Grandmother once told me that during WW2, they pretty much lived off of nettle; that, and the occasional rabbit. Food was scarce and this plant was in abundance. She had a great sense of humor and called it the bunker diet. I absolutely love walking through a patch any time my arthritis acts up. The chemicals in the "needles" helps to numb the afflicted areas. That was a practice I learned from the Native American folk. It truly is an amazing plant."

"Here in Denmark they are called “brændenælder” (“burning nettles”). We have breakfast products with dried burning nettle leaves in them (krudtuglegrød). The fibres in the stems can be/ have been used to make clothes (by hand, you can make a cord strong enough to be used for fishing).
If you ferment the leaves and stems in a barrel of water, you get a very potent, though not nice smelling, fertilizer, called “ajle”. Nice channel. Keep up the good work"

"My grandpa used to make false manure from tons of fermented stinging nettle, it smelled horrible but plants grew amazing when watered with solution"



Add an equal weight of brown sugar to your nettles. Squeeze them all together, place in a container and ferment for 5-7 days. I think it's called FPJ by the natural Korean farming community. (Fermented plant juice.). You can find vids on youtube
 

newmisty

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FREE Healthy OKRA SEEDLINGS (Springdale)​

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I'm thinning my over-seeded OKRA plot and giving away excess okra seedlings! The seedlings will be dug from the plot with roots intact, but need to be re-planted and watered right away in your own garden. To increase chances of survival, it is best to protect each seedling from the hot sun with tent-like cardboard for a few days. Water generously.

Grow your own veggies, and save money!

First Come, First Served!

Please bring your own container
 

newmisty

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Our neighbor is building a retaining wall along the property line, giving me the excuse to redesign garden beds along that wall and this gives me some good ideas.

Also, that looks like a coral bark Japanese Maple upper left, pretty in every season.
What do you think that is growing through the "risers" of the stairs?
 

gnome

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What do you think that is growing through the "risers" of the stairs?
Definitely rosemary and strawberries, probably just some other herbs. Maybe some kind of mint or marjoram.
JMO, marjoram is way underrated. I grow it as a ground cover under fruit trees.
 

gnome

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Efforts to STOP THE STEAL were largely successful. Atomic Red nectarine. Tree is still heavy with fruit.


stop the steal.jpg


atomic 20220616_223604_HDR.jpg
 

newmisty

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gnome

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What a deep vibrant color. What's that netting called?

I can't yet say I recommend it, first season using. But seems to have at least kept the rats and ground squirrels at bay temporarily. I plan on rotating through the fruit trees as season progresses. Maybe cover the tomatoes if we start losing them.

I suspect it will be frayed by the end of season. It doesn't come with any real binding at the edges, no drawstring, so we have it tied on with string and clothespins. Someday I may get around to just putting my whole row of stone fruits in a cage of hardware cloth.

Off Amazon listed as:

Garden Netting, Plant Covers 10x33Ft Net Ultra Fine Mesh Protection Netting for Vegetable Plants Fruits Flowers Crops Greenhouse Row Cover Raised Bed Barrier Screen Protection Net Cover​

 

EricTheCat

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Things are happening fast in the garden. Yesterday, knowing that a stretch of very hot and windy weather would be starting today, I mulched the gardens very heavily. Also got my deer fence up and gave the gardens a real good soaking late last night.

Garden-2022-06-19-Img_9143SS.jpg


Milkweed are getting ready to bloom
Garden-2022-06-19-Img_9145SS.jpg


Echinacea #1 looks happy and is budding.
Garden-2022-06-19-Img_9146SS.jpg


I thought echinacea #2 would remain covered by the monarda, but it has pushed its way through. Can't wait for each to bloom.
Garden-2022-06-19-Img_9148SS.jpg


Peppers
Garden-2022-06-19-Img_9149SS.jpg


Garden-2022-06-19-Img_9168SS.jpg


Marigolds, celery, lettuce, thyme and tarragon
Garden-2022-06-19-Img_9150SS.jpg


Tomatoes growing ridiculously fast
Garden-2022-06-19-Img_9151SS.jpg


A little big boy tomato
Garden-2022-06-19-Img_9165SS.jpg


Cherry tomatoes in the double stem configuration
Garden-2022-06-19-Img_9167SS.jpg


You know it is my garden when there is a milkweed pant allowed to grow among the onions
Garden-2022-06-19-Img_9154SS.jpg


Peas are finally flowering. Kind of late this year I think
Garden-2022-06-19-Img_9158SS.jpg


Cucumbers. One plant is a bit blocked by a mullein leaf but I figure it will be well above it in a day or two tat this rate.
Garden-2022-06-19-Img_9159SS.jpg


Last but not least, the potato plants are gigantic. That should be extremely fun to dig out when it is time.
Garden-2022-06-19-Img_9162SS.jpg


Good luck everyone.
 

newmisty

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Tree height measuring hack
 

newmisty

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Things are happening fast in the garden. Yesterday, knowing that a stretch of very hot and windy weather would be starting today, I mulched the gardens very heavily. Also got my deer fence up and gave the gardens a real good soaking late last night.

View attachment 264466

Milkweed are getting ready to bloom
View attachment 264467

Echinacea #1 looks happy and is budding.
View attachment 264468

I thought echinacea #2 would remain covered by the monarda, but it has pushed its way through. Can't wait for each to bloom.
View attachment 264469

Peppers
View attachment 264470

View attachment 264471

Marigolds, celery, lettuce, thyme and tarragon
View attachment 264472

Tomatoes growing ridiculously fast
View attachment 264473

A little big boy tomato
View attachment 264474

Cherry tomatoes in the double stem configuration
View attachment 264475

You know it is my garden when there is a milkweed pant allowed to grow among the onions
View attachment 264476

Peas are finally flowering. Kind of late this year I think
View attachment 264477

Cucumbers. One plant is a bit blocked by a mullein leaf but I figure it will be well above it in a day or two tat this rate.
View attachment 264478

Last but not least, the potato plants are gigantic. That should be extremely fun to dig out when it is time.
View attachment 264479

Good luck everyone.
Potatoes looking very happy
 

gnome

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Things are happening fast in the garden. Yesterday, knowing that a stretch of very hot and windy weather would be starting today, I mulched the gardens very heavily. Also got my deer fence up and gave the gardens a real good soaking late last night.

View attachment 264466

Milkweed are getting ready to bloom
View attachment 264467

Echinacea #1 looks happy and is budding.
View attachment 264468

I thought echinacea #2 would remain covered by the monarda, but it has pushed its way through. Can't wait for each to bloom.
View attachment 264469

Peppers
View attachment 264470

View attachment 264471

Marigolds, celery, lettuce, thyme and tarragon
View attachment 264472

Tomatoes growing ridiculously fast
View attachment 264473

A little big boy tomato
View attachment 264474

Cherry tomatoes in the double stem configuration
View attachment 264475

You know it is my garden when there is a milkweed pant allowed to grow among the onions
View attachment 264476

Peas are finally flowering. Kind of late this year I think
View attachment 264477

Cucumbers. One plant is a bit blocked by a mullein leaf but I figure it will be well above it in a day or two tat this rate.
View attachment 264478

Last but not least, the potato plants are gigantic. That should be extremely fun to dig out when it is time.
View attachment 264479

Good luck everyone.
Lookin good!
Do you use the echinacea for herbal meds?
I made an echinacea tincture about 20 years ago that lasted for years, I could fight off any cold real quick.
Maybe placebo, maybe I was just young and invincible.
 

EricTheCat

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Lookin good!
Do you use the echinacea for herbal meds?
I made an echinacea tincture about 20 years ago that lasted for years, I could fight off any cold real quick.
Maybe placebo, maybe I was just young and invincible.
The echinacea is for the birds and butterflies. A lady I was seeing years ago made me echinacea tea once when I was sick. I hated the smell but it tasted really good and I got better. Hard to say though, like your experience maybe I just got better.

I have eaten monarda leaves which is in the same flower garden. Also known as bee balm. It is one of the first perennials to grow in the spring and it is an edible herb similar in flavor to basil.
 

EricTheCat

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Potatoes looking very happy
I have had good harvests with potatoes with much smaller plants. I assume they will flower soon and start developing tubers. I planted 6 and they formed into a big bush and have overtaken the marigolds, cilantro and thyme growing among them.
 

Avalon

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My garden is coming in!! Ill get some pics today. My cucumbers are struggling this year but the squash looks good. In the past I gave most of my stuff away. Not this year. I'm freezing squash this week. The freezer will fill fast and I may try my hand at canning when green beans come in. I'm trying to figure out how to freezer tomatoes where they take up the least room. I use them for soup and stew, any suggestions? In the past I blanched, removed the skins and put them in a freezer bag. They take up a lot of room.
 

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My garden is coming in!! Ill get some pics today. My cucumbers are struggling this year but the squash looks good. In the past I gave most of my stuff away. Not this year. I'm freezing squash this week. The freezer will fill fast and I may try my hand at canning when green beans come in. I'm trying to figure out how to freezer tomatoes where they take up the least room. I use them for soup and stew, any suggestions? In the past I blanched, removed the skins and put them in a freezer bag. They take up a lot of room.

I haven't tried this method but I might this year. I stumbled across this video recently about how to dry and make a powder out of tomatoes. Then you can use the powder with water to make paste or sauce depending how much water you add. I imagine you could also make soup with it.

I am sure other people here have other ideas. I have been meaning to mention this anyway to see if anyone here has done this.

 

Avalon

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I haven't tried this method but I might this year. I stumbled across this video recently about how to dry and make a powder out of tomatoes. Then you can use the powder with water to make paste or sauce depending how much water you add. I imagine you could also make soup with it.

I am sure other people here have other ideas. I have been meaning to mention this anyway to see if anyone here has done this.

interesting video... it might be doable for part of the tomatoes that would be used for certain things. This is my year to experiment so I'm open.
 

Cigarlover

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My garden is coming in!! Ill get some pics today. My cucumbers are struggling this year but the squash looks good. In the past I gave most of my stuff away. Not this year. I'm freezing squash this week. The freezer will fill fast and I may try my hand at canning when green beans come in. I'm trying to figure out how to freezer tomatoes where they take up the least room. I use them for soup and stew, any suggestions? In the past I blanched, removed the skins and put them in a freezer bag. They take up a lot of room.
I wash my tomatoes then just pop them in the freezer in bags. After they are frozen for awhile (A week or 2) and I have enough to make sauce with I thaw them. Who they thaw the skins fall right off and lots of water is released. Then make your sauce , salsa whatever. Sauce you can freeze or can. Salsa I can.
 

Avalon

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I wash my tomatoes then just pop them in the freezer in bags. After they are frozen for awhile (A week or 2) and I have enough to make sauce with I thaw them. Who they thaw the skins fall right off and lots of water is released. Then make your sauce , salsa whatever. Sauce you can freeze or can. Salsa I can.
I really dislike blanching as I always mange to burn myself and make a huge mess. So the skins will come off and there is no need to blanch?
 

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I really dislike blanching as I always mange to burn myself and make a huge mess. So the skins will come off and there is no need to blanch?
Thats correct. I discovered it by accident. Also a huge amount of clear water is released after the freezing process so much easier to cook down what's left and make into sauce or whatever.. If you have a decent mesh strainer and want to remove the seeds, that's a good way to do it before you process. The seeds don't really bother me though.

I wanted to add, I used to blanch before as well. Not anymore though. Last year I actually froze everything in the summer and waited to process until the fall when it cooled off.
 

Avalon

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Thats correct. I discovered it by accident. Also a huge amount of clear water is released after the freezing process so much easier to cook down what's left and make into sauce or whatever.. If you have a decent mesh strainer and want to remove the seeds, that's a good way to do it before you process. The seeds don't really bother me though.

I wanted to add, I used to blanch before as well. Not anymore though. Last year I actually froze everything in the summer and waited to process until the fall when it cooled off.
ill give it a try.. I will not miss blanching. Plus getting some water out will condense.
 

Avalon

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The foil on the peppers worked. The guinea hens left the plants alone and they recovered. We always get early blight on tomatoes. I sprayed this year so we will see.

IMG_4150.JPG
IMG_4149.JPG
IMG_4148.JPG
IMG_4135.JPG
 

specsaregood

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Thats correct. I discovered it by accident. Also a huge amount of clear water is released after the freezing process so much easier to cook down what's left and make into sauce or whatever.. If you have a decent mesh strainer and want to remove the seeds, that's a good way to do it before you process. The seeds don't really bother me though.

I wanted to add, I used to blanch before as well. Not anymore though. Last year I actually froze everything in the summer and waited to process until the fall when it cooled off.
I usually just put the tomatoes in the chopper, then push the mess through my metal strainer. It removes 100% of the seeds and 99% of the skins too. It can be time consuming; but since we make sauce out of cherry tomatoes, it is better than trying to remove skins. But I'll try freezing some this summer and see if that works out, thanks!
 

gnome

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If any y'all want a good sauce tomato, try the San Marzano. Virtually seedless, low moisture content and rich tomato flavor - the official tomato for Napolitan pizza.

As for me and toms, I have some kind of yellow grape tomato that volunteered one year and keeps coming back.
When I try to grow bigger fancier toms, the critters usually get em well before they ripen, so it's not worth the trouble.
The grape tomatoes beat the pest pressure with numbers and speed. The ones that do get eaten guarantee I'll have tomato plants next year.
 

Cigarlover

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If any y'all want a good sauce tomato, try the San Marzano. Virtually seedless, low moisture content and rich tomato flavor - the official tomato for Napolitan pizza.

As for me and toms, I have some kind of yellow grape tomato that volunteered one year and keeps coming back.
When I try to grow bigger fancier toms, the critters usually get em well before they ripen, so it's not worth the trouble.
The grape tomatoes beat the pest pressure with numbers and speed. The ones that do get eaten guarantee I'll have tomato plants next year.
San marzanos are good and it's all I'm growing this year for canning. Gonna try and clone a few and see if they finish up before end of the season.
 

specsaregood

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When I try to grow bigger fancier toms, the critters usually get em well before they ripen, so it's not worth the trouble.
The grape tomatoes beat the pest pressure with numbers and speed. The ones that do get eaten guarantee I'll have tomato plants next year.
Exactly the same reason I grow cherries, grapes, and a few romas. anything bigger and nature gets too many of them.

A couple weeks back the wife went transplanted all our volunteer tomatoes and peppers from the garden box and put them in random places throughout our property. "figured maybe we'll end up with lots of wild tomatoes and peppers everywhere if we just let them drop seeds everywhere, can't hurt." I liked the logic. if any of them come back with juliet-type tomatoes, we'll probably save them to try growing next year.
 

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CbTXTYq.png


harvested our first italian frying peppers of the season from the new pepper garden and they were good.
honeyberries are starting to show up, not bad for new plants.
blueberries are booming and starting to ripen and tomaters are getting big...
 

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Avalon

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BigJim#1-8

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