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White House Arrivals & Departures

GOLDBRIX

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From Politico.com story : ....."Trump has offered almost nothing in the way of a legislative vision for 2019 beyond approval of a new trade deal and vague references to infrastructure".
Why should he propose any "vision" until the new DEM. controlled House of Reps arrive with all their grandiose dreams of how Socialist States of America should look. After all they'll control the purse strings and be pushing an Impeachment Agenda ( that will get no where).

JMHO
 

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Trump To Announce Heather Nauert As UN Ambassador Tomorrow


by Tyler Durden
Thu, 12/06/2018 - 21:10


Confirming rumors from a month ago, and following Dina Powell's "not interested" response, President Trump is reportedly set to name State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert to replace Nikki Haley, who unexpectedly announced her resignation in October and promised to serve in her role through the end of 2018, as UN ambassador.

Trump had reportedly told aides he wanted a woman to fill the role.

Ivanka Trump, the president's daughter and White House adviser, was also touted by Trump as an "incredible" choice for the position, though Trump also said that he would be criticized for nepotism if Ivanka was selected.



Fox News reports that Trump will make the announcement Friday morning in a tweet.

Nauert, who came to government from Fox News, served as State Department spokesman for both Rex Tillerson and Mike Pompeo but has enjoyed a closer relationship with Trump's second secretary of state than she did Tillerson, who was privately skeptical of her close ties with the West Wing.

Her elevation to a top diplomatic role underscores the importance Trump has placed on having his top aides also serve as television surrogates. Nauert has briefed regularly from the State Department podium and had a long career in television news before that.

Still, as a diplomat she lacks experience.

If nominated by the president, she will face a confirmation by the Senate, which remains in GOP control following November's midterm elections.

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-12-06/trump-announce-heather-nauert-un-ambassador-tomorrow
 

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White House chief of staff John Kelly expected to resign soon

By Kaitlan Collins, CNN
14 mins ago

John Kelly is expected to resign as White House chief of staff in the coming days, two sources familiar with the situation unfolding in the West Wing tell CNN.

Seventeen months in, Kelly and President Donald Trump have reached a stalemate in their relationship and it is no longer seen as tenable by either party. Though Trump asked Kelly over the summer to stay on as chief of staff for two more years, the two have stopped speaking in recent days.

Trump is actively discussing a replacement plan, though a person involved in the process said nothing is final right now and ultimately it is up to Trump. Potential replacements include Nick Ayers, Vice President Mike Pence's chief of staff, who is still seen as a leading contender.

News of Kelly's imminent departure was first reported by Axios.

Kelly has seen his status as chief of staff diminished in recent months, with the President circumventing many of the policies and protocols the retired Marine Corps general put in place when he entered the West Wing last year.

In July, Kelly announced to White House staff that Trump had asked him to stay on as chief of staff until at least 2020, and that he had agreed.

CNN reported last month that Trump was considering potential replacements for several senior positions in his administration as part of a post-midterms staff shakeup.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...expected-to-resign-soon/ar-BBQCPJO?ocid=ientp
 

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White House chief of staff John Kelly expected to resign soon

By Kaitlan Collins, CNN
14 mins ago

John Kelly is expected to resign as White House chief of staff in the coming days, two sources familiar with the situation unfolding in the West Wing tell CNN.

Seventeen months in, Kelly and President Donald Trump have reached a stalemate in their relationship and it is no longer seen as tenable by either party. Though Trump asked Kelly over the summer to stay on as chief of staff for two more years, the two have stopped speaking in recent days.

Trump is actively discussing a replacement plan, though a person involved in the process said nothing is final right now and ultimately it is up to Trump. Potential replacements include Nick Ayers, Vice President Mike Pence's chief of staff, who is still seen as a leading contender.

News of Kelly's imminent departure was first reported by Axios.

Kelly has seen his status as chief of staff diminished in recent months, with the President circumventing many of the policies and protocols the retired Marine Corps general put in place when he entered the West Wing last year.

In July, Kelly announced to White House staff that Trump had asked him to stay on as chief of staff until at least 2020, and that he had agreed.

CNN reported last month that Trump was considering potential replacements for several senior positions in his administration as part of a post-midterms staff shakeup.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...expected-to-resign-soon/ar-BBQCPJO?ocid=ientp

Again?

CNN has been saying Kelly's resigning soon for the past 16months.
 

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Trump announces that Army General Mark Milley will become the next Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

  • If confirmed by the Senate, Milley would succeed retiring Marine Gen Joseph Dunford as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
  • President Trump tweeted the announcement Saturday morning, thanking 'both of these incredible men for their service to our country!'
  • Milley commanded troops during several tours in Iraq and Afghanistan and has served as chief of the Army for the last three years
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...cks-General-Mark-Milley-military-adviser.html
 

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Trump confirms Chief of Staff John Kelly will leave the White House 'by the end of the year' and thanks 'the great guy' for his service, saying his replacement will be announced soon

  • Trump said on Saturday that White House Chief of Staff John Kelly will depart
  • Kelly was reportedly no longer speaking with Trump and his exit was rumored
  • A replacement for Kelly will be announced in the next day or two, Trump said
  • Pence's chief of staff Nick Ayers is Trump's top replacement pick, a source says
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6474853/Trump-confirms-chief-staff-John-Kelly-end-year.html
 

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Nick Ayers turned Trump down. Sites time line issues.
 

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'Mission Impossible': Trump turns chief of staff job into a laughing stock leaving questions about who will want the top West Wing gig

  • President Donald Trump has no obvious second choice for his chief of staff job after Nick Ayers turned him down
  • The job has become a laughing stock under the president with his first two chiefs mocked and humiliated
  • Ayers was said to be concerned about his ability to manage the president and maintain his reputation within the Republican Party
  • Several names are being bandied about but there is no favorite
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...aughing-stock-leaving-questions-want-gig.html
 

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Trump's 36-year-old former shoo-in for chief of staff earned up to $54 million through consulting arrangements and 'dark money' groups

  • Nick Ayers is departing as chief of staff for Vice President Mike Pence
  • He was touted as the top choice to replace current chief Gen. John Kelly, who is leaving at the end of the year
  • The young aide is prized for his political know-how
  • Reported net worth of $12 to $54 million
  • Earned through consulting gigs and benefited from ad sales
  • Consulted for Aflac, Coca-Cola, has land holdings in Georgia
  • Also benefited from 'dark money' group Freedom Frontier says watchdog
  • Potential scrutiny of finances identified as a reason he turned down one of nation's most powerful positions
  • Administration official said finances were 'zero factor' in him not serving as COS

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...chief-staff-earned-54-million-consultant.html
 

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What does it take to become Trump's chief of staff? Jared and Ivanka's approval.

Politico
By Gabby Orr
28 mins ago

President Donald Trump will weigh several criteria as he searches for his next chief of staff, including loyalty, political skills and management experience. But there’s one thing any potential hire must do: win the approval of Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump.

Trump’s son-in-law and daughter, who are also White House advisers, want a political ally in the chief of staff job, and they are using their unrivaled influence to ensure they get one, according to seven former and current White House officials.

Those sources described a search process steered by the president — “He’s just calling around to friends,” as one Republican close to the White House put it — but carefully regulated by his family as Trump works to replace his outgoing chief of staff, John Kelly.

Their influence could dim the chances of some candidates for the post, White House aides and allies say, including one of Trump’s favorites — Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.), who is not close with the thirtysomething couple. They are also opposed to the prospect of former Trump deputy campaign manager David Bossie taking on the role. It’s also an obstacle for former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who put Kushner’s father behind bars as a federal prosecutor in New Jersey.

Among Kushner and Ivanka Trump’s top choices is Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, whom they view as extremely loyal. Mnuchin is said to be uninterested in the often-thankless job of Trump’s staff chief, however.

Kushner in particular is riding high at the moment. On Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) announced that the Senate would take up a criminal justice reform bill that Kushner has spent months crafting, and whose fate had recently seemed uncertain. Kushner was rewarded with a grinning photo prominently featured on the Drudge Report — whose publisher, Matt Drudge, he has cultivated as an ally, and whose coverage Trump follows closely.

Kelly may have hastened his demise by emerging as an internal rival of the couple. The retired Marine general found their vaguely-defined government roles and unfettered access to Trump exasperating. Tensions between the two camps reached a fever pitch in February, when Kushner’s interim security clearance was temporarily downgraded as part of an overhaul of the approval process that Kelly ordered.

Kelly’s exit leaves Kushner and Ivanka Trump with few influential opponents inside the White House.

“Kelly was the last one they wanted out,” said a former White House official, who worked with Trump and Kushner during the 2016 campaign. “Now it’s not just the president who needs to sign off on” his next chief of staff, the official added, “It’s Jared and Ivanka. They have a big voice.”

The duo nearly orchestrated the transition they wanted: the installation of Nick Ayers, chief of staff to Vice President Mike Pence, as Kelly’s successor. A second former White House official said Kushner and Ayers bonded over mutual frustration with what they considered Kelly’s lack of political shrewdness and agreed that Trump’s next chief of staff needs sharper Washington instincts.

“They were both looking for a course correction — someone who understands the political side of things,” the official said.

But that plan imploded over the weekend when Ayers, a 36-year-old father of young triplets, refused to agree to a two-year term and backed out of becoming chief of staff, citing his family as a reason. His surprise decision landed the Trump family “back at square one,” according to a third former White House official.

Now they are weighing which of the candidates in whom Trump is interested meet their standards. White House aides and people close to the president are already betting that several candidates will fall out of contention in the coming days because of their troubled or insufficient relationships with Kushner and Ivanka Trump.

The former New Yorkers also tend to favor cosmopolitan political moderates over the kind of hard-core conservative activists who appeal to President Trump. In addition to Mnuchin, their allies have included former chief White House economic adviser Gary Cohn, a former Goldman Sachs banker, and former deputy national security adviser Dina Powell, also a Goldman Sachs executive.

That category does not include Bossie, the former campaign aide and longtime conservative activist, who has protected his own reputation among the president’s aides and advisers, but whose friendship with ex-Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski is unsettling for many.

“Bossie would have a pretty good chance of getting the job, if not for them,” a source close to the White House said Tuesday, hours after Bossie appeared on “Fox & Friends” in what some viewed as a kind of audition for the role. (Trump is a well-known viewer of the show.)

“I’ve certainly known the president a long, long time — long before he was a candidate,” Bossie said. “I do feel I understand the movement that elected him…. I understand his priorities.” When asked, Bossie acknowledged that he and Lewandowski will be having lunch with Trump on Friday.

Some sources close to the White House say Bossie considers it more likely that he can land a deputy job under Meadows should the conservative Freedom Caucus leader win the job.

One possible factor in Meadows’ favor: He recently defended Ivanka Trump’s use of a personal email account for official White House business, tweeting that “the Hillary Clinton email scandal isn’t even close to the Ivanka email issue.”

Other candidates include White House counselor Kellyanne Conway and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Republican fundraiser Wayne Berman.

During a rare interview on Monday night, Kushner revealed little about the chief of staff search to Fox News host and Trump friend Sean Hannity. He said his father-in-law would “make the right choice for chief of staff when he’s ready,” adding that Trump would “choose somebody he’s got great chemistry with, [a] great relationship with,” and who can aid his 2020 reelection bid.

But Kushner and Ivanka Trump have not always had a Midas touch in their personnel advice.

In 2016, Kushner helped persuade his father-in-law to hire a seasoned political operative to help round up delegates at the Republican National Convention.

That operative was Paul Manafort, who went on to become Trump’s campaign chairman before emerging as a central figure in special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian election meddling. A Virginia jury found Manafort guilty this summer on eight counts of bank and tax fraud.

The couple also played a role in bringing Michael Flynn to the White House as national security adviser. Flynn was fired a month into the Trump administration after misleading Pence about his contacts with Russian officials. He has since pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI and is now a cooperating witness in Mueller’s probe.

And the pair also had a hand in bringing on Anthony Scaramucci as White House communications director — a position he held for 10 days before a spectacular flame-out.

Kushner and Ivanka Trump have installed several top aides who have proved reliable operators — including Powell; longtime pals Reed and Maggie Cordish, who led separate White House efforts on innovation and tax reform prior to leaving this year; and Chris Liddell, who worked beside Kushner in the White House Office of American Innovation before Kelly promoted him to deputy chief of staff for policy.

A spokesperson for Kushner and Trump did not respond to a request for comment.

The search for Trump’s third chief of staff comes as Kushner and Ivanka prepare to dig in for a brutal 2020 election cycle in which the president is expected to face a more challenging electoral map, plus a steady stream of investigations into his administration and the conclusion of Mueller’s investigation.

“As corny as it sounds, the biggest thing the president needs right now is a friend — someone who gets along with him and his family and can be a comfort to them,” said a former senior White House official. “That’s the most important attribute a chief of staff can have, and that’s what [Trump] and his family are looking for.”

Nancy Cook, Eliana Johnson and Andrew Restuccia contributed to this report.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...ed-and-ivankas-approval/ar-BBQPQIw?ocid=ientp
 

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Now JARED wants to be Trump's chief of staff and has lobbied his father-in-law for the job (but president insists he's got FIVE candidates fighting it out)

  • The president first claimed that 'more than' ten people are vying for one of the world's most powerful positions this week
  • Then he whittled the list down by one name on Wednesday, as the White House announced it would not be GOP Rep. Mark Meadows
  • Said on Thursday he was seriously considering five people for the thankless job
  • Now Jared Kushner is revealed to be lobbying for the role and has met his father-in-law to discuss it
  • He was unexpectedly turned down by Mike Pence chief of staff Nick Ayers
  • Trump announced chief John Kelly is stepping down on Saturday after clashing with the retired general for months

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...n-really-terrific-contenders-chief-staff.html
 

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..............
48366564_10218935124875469_2163593043830112256_n.jpg
 

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Turnover in Trump Cabinet, White House shows no sign of slowing amid new departures

Fox News
Gregg Re
24 mins ago

President Trump has long promised to create jobs, and has consistently delivered — especially in his own White House and Cabinet, where rapid turnover is showing no signs of slowing down as 2018 comes to a close.

High-profile departures in the Trump administration — from former Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price and Press Secretary Sean Spicer to fired Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (whom Trump recently characterized as "lazy as hell" and "dumb as a rock") — have attracted the most attention. They have contributed to what some analysts have called an unprecedented number of high-level Cabinet departures going back 100 years.

The most popular parlor game in Washington right now centers on who will replace outgoing Chief of Staff John Kelly.

TRUMP REVEALS CHIEF OF STAFF SEARCH DOWN TO 5 CANDIDATES

"At some point, everybody leaves," Trump told "60 Minutes" host Lesley Stahl in October. "Everybody. People leave. That's Washington."

But dozens of Executive Branch offices, both inside and outside 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, have emptied and filled at historic rates, with and without fanfare. The exits have included unfriendly dismissals, voluntary moves to the private sector, and other resignations.

The headline-grabbing departures include two national security advisers — H.R. McMaster and Michael Flynn, who was booted for misleading the White House about conversations with the Russian ambassador and is now facing sentencing for lying to the FBI. John Bolton now runs the national security ship.

Before Kelly, former GOP chairman Reince Priebus also came and went at the helm of the White House operation. He has since dished on the drama inside the Oval Office in the book "The Gatekeepers."

"Take everything you've heard and multiply it by 50," Priebus said.

Within the Cabinet, Attorney General Jeff Sessions was the latest to be forced out, submitting his resignation the day after the midterms at the request of the president. Trump spent the last year publicly criticizing his DOJ leader for recusing himself in the Russia probe and opening the door to the special counsel investigation. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt resigned over the summer amid numerous ethics scandals, replaced by Acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler. Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin was pushed out amid his own ethics controversy. U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley also is planning to leave, without controversy, and State Department official and former Fox News journalist Heather Nauert is Trump's pick to succeed her.

Within the White House, the National Security Council has been the scene of considerable turnover, and not just at the top.

Senior Director for Africa Robin Townley, for example, left the administration in early 2017 after the CIA refused to grant him an elite-level Sensitive Compartmented Information security clearance that he needed to serve on the National Security Council (NSC).

Townley, a top deputy to Flynn, had long held a less selective top-secret security clearance related to his service as a Marine. Sources told Politico that Flynn and Townley viewed the rejection as a "hit job from inside the CIA on Flynn and the people close to him" because of Townley's critical views of the intelligence community.

Ezra Cohen-Watnick was reportedly forced out as a senior intelligence director at the NSC as well, for supposedly leaking information about so-called "unmasking" activities by Obama administration officials to California Republican Rep. Devin Nunes, the chair of the House Intelligence Committee. (“Unmasking” involves asking U.S. intelligence authorities to fill in the redacted names of U.S. citizens whose comments are caught up in intelligence agencies' foreign intelligence intercepts, which are routinely removed to protect their Fourth Amendment rights. Such revelations are supposed to be relatively rare, clearly justified and tightly controlled.)

MELANIA TRUMP'S OFFICE ISSUES STRIKING STATEMENT CALLING FOR WH STAFFER'S TERMINATION

Cohen-Watnick's attorney denied the allegations, saying that “he never showed the documents to Nunes," had never "met with Nunes" and had "nothing to do with Nunes.” Bloomberg reported that Trump personally directed the Department of Justice to hire Cohen-Watnick after the episode.

Several other relatively low-profile White House staffers who had key roles in major developments have also left their posts in the past two years. Keith Schiller, the president's longtime personal bodyguard who attracted scrutiny after being photographed accidentally exposing Defense Secretary James Mattis' phone number, has departed as director of Oval Office operations.

Schiller famously hand-delivered the notice of FBI Director James Comey's termination to FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C. in May 2017 — but Comey was not there, and instead learned of his sudden firing from a television news report while in Los Angeles.


Also departed is White House Counsel Don McGahn, who oversaw not only the White House's response to Special Counsel Robert Mueller's probe, but also the contentious confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh amid a series of lurid and uncorroborated sexual misconduct allegations. McGahn, who left in October, has been replaced by Pat Cipollone.

In a rare interview, Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner told Fox News' "Hannity" exclusively on Monday that Cipollone "is going to be fabulous."

Marc Short, Trump's former legislative affairs director and a former high-level aide to Vice President Mike Pence, left the White House in July to consult and become a fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center School of Public Affairs. His appointment to the one-year fellowship prompted fierce, partisan backlash from students and faculty at UVA.

TRUMP CABINET OFFICIALS IN THE CROSSHAIRS AS DEMS AIM TO RAMP UP INVESTIGATIONS

Short, who previously obtained his MBA from UVA, departed just as the confirmation battle over Kavanaugh was intensifying. His record as the White House's liaison to Capitol Hill staffers and politicians was largely seen as successful, even if some of the results he oversaw were mixed.

Although he helped ensure the passage of Trump's historic $1.5 trillion tax overhaul last year, Short was unable to push the president's longstanding effort to repeal ObamaCare over the finish line. That legislative measure — panned by Democrats and some Republicans for failing to offer a viable health care alternative — was defeated in a dramatic 11th-hour vote by the late Arizona GOP Sen. John McCain.

The White House tapped Shahira Knight, who had served on the White House's National Economic Council and played a major role in developing the tax legislation, to replace Short.

Other exits from the Trump orbit have been comparably ugly and unceremonious.

White House Staff Secretary Rob Porter was forced to resign earlier this year after two of his ex-wives came forward with domestic abuse allegations. Trump has reportedly expressed a desire to see Porter return to the White House at some point.

Former Deputy National Security adviser Mira Ricardel also lost her post last month after an unusual public spat with first lady Melania Trump. The Wall Street Journal reported in mid-November that Ricardel had clashed with the first lady's staff over seating arrangements on a plane during her October trip to Africa. The paper added that the first lady's office suspected Ricardel of leaking negative stories about the first lady and her staff.

TRACKING SOME NOTABLE TRUMP CABINET DEPARTURES: FROM AG SESSIONS TO UN REP NIKKI HALEY AND EPA HEAD SCOTT PRUITT

Dr. Ronny Jackson, formerly Trump's personal physician and nominee to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs, is now neither after he was besieged by unproven and disputed allegations compiled by Montana Democratic Sen. Jon Tester’s office concerning his prescription-drug practices and use of alcohol. (Trump has bitterly feuded with Tester, the top Democrat on the Republican-controlled Senate Veteran Affairs Committee, ever since the episode.)

Perhaps the most storied and colorful departure was that of Anthony Scaramucci, who left as communications director after a mere 11 days on the job (or 10, depending how you count it). Trump confidant Hope Hicks assumed the job, then resigned early this year.

The flurry of departures from the White House has continued into 2018's final weeks. Pence Chief of Staff Nick Ayers announced Sunday he will leave the White House at the end of the year, leaving unclear who will replace Kelly, as Ayers was the favorite for that role.

White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway told Fox News on Tuesday that Kelly, a retired Marine Corps general, might stay on briefly into the new year while the president finds a replacement.

For his part, Trump has clearly signaled that replacements for other roles are very likely coming up in the new year.

"Yeah, other people will go, sure," Trump told Stahl in the "60 Minutes" interview. "We have a great Cabinet. There are some people I'm not happy with. I have some people that I'm not thrilled with. And I have other people that I'm beyond thrilled with."

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...ing-amid-new-departures/ar-BBQWKGC?ocid=ientp
 

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- Chris Christie declines White House chief of staff role

 

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Trump names budget director Mick Mulvaney as acting White House chief of staff

Washington Post
Philip Rucker, Josh Dawsey, Damian Paletta
1 hr ago


President Trump on Friday abruptly named Mick Mulvaney, currently the director of the Office of Management and Budget, the White House chief of staff in an acting capacity.

Mulvaney replaces John F. Kelly, a retired four-star Marine Corps general who Trump ousted as chief of staff last week, and the appointment caps the president’s extraordinary week-long public search for a third chief of staff in two years.

“I am pleased to announce that Mick Mulvaney, Director of the Office of Management & Budget, will be named Acting White House Chief of Staff, replacing General John Kelly, who has served our Country with distinction,” Trump wrote on Twitter. “Mick has done an outstanding job while in the Administration.”

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Trump added, “I look forward to working with him in this new capacity as we continue to MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN! John will be staying until the end of the year. He is a GREAT PATRIOT and I want to personally thank him for his service!”

Trump selected Mulvaney both because of the relationship the two men have forged during the first two years of the administration and because of Mulvaney’s previous experience in Congress, according to a senior administration official who briefed reporters only on the condition of anonymity.

“He got picked because the president liked him,” the official said. “They get along.”

Mulvaney, a frequent visitor to the Oval Office, met Friday with Trump to discuss the budget and a potential government shutdown, the official said, adding that Mulvaney knew he would be named acting chief of staff before Trump fired off his tweet.

Mulvaney will manage a White House under siege. Democrats will take the House majority in January and are promising a series of oversight investigations, including into alleged corruption in the administration. Meanwhile, special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s Russia investigation has been intensifying, while a separate investigation by federal prosecutors in New York that involves illegal hush-money payments to women who alleged affairs with Trump is ongoing.

Mulvaney, a former Republican congressman from South Carolina, is one of the more ideologically conservative members of Trump’s Cabinet. He was elected to the House in 2010 as a member of the tea party movement and was known for his professed support of fiscal conservatism.

The senior administration official said there was “no time limit” for Mulvaney’s appointment, explaining that he was named in an acting capacity “because that’s what the president wants.”

Russell Vought, the deputy director of management and budget, will replace Mulvaney as OMB director, the official said.

Mulvaney, 51, has held several hats in the Trump administration. He has served as budget director since the beginning, but also held the role of acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau through much of the past year until his permanent successor, Kathleen Kraninger, was sworn in earlier this week.

Trump’s selection of Mulvaney comes after several candidates announced publicly that they were not interested in the position. After meeting with Trump for more than an hour at the White House residence on Thursday evening, former New Jersey governor Chris Christie announced at midday Friday that he had taken himself out of consideration.

Nick Ayers, chief of staff to Vice President Pence, was offered the job by Trump last weekend but declined.

Mulvaney’s aides in recent days played down his chances of becoming chief of staff, saying he was not interested in the position.

But a senior White House official said Mulvaney was interested all along. Earlier this year, at a private dinner, Mulvaney told Trump that he wanted to be chief of staff. He vowed loyalty to the president’s family — including daughter Ivanka Trump and son-in-law Jared Kushner, both senior White House advisers — and said that he would not leak to reporters. He told Trump he would manage the staff, but not try to manage the president — an answer Trump liked, according to a person with direct knowledge of the conversation. At the time, Trump was deciding whether he should keep Kelly.

Mulvaney has developed a political profile of his own, making calls to donors and attending political breakfasts and lunches. He has often discussed his conversations with the president, according to a person who has attended events, and speaks of Trump with affection.

Trump grew deeply annoyed that his chief-of-staff search was being portrayed negatively in the media because top candidates were turning him down, according to a senior administration official.

“In the best of times, this is a thankless, all-consuming, brutal job,” said Chris Whipple, author of “The Gatekeepers,” a history of White House chiefs of staff. “And under this president in particular, it’s almost mission impossible . . . Nobody wants the job because it’s impossible to perform given Trump’s personality and his belief that he can fly solo.”

Trump and Mulvaney hardly knew each other when the incoming president asked the firebrand House Republican to serve as his budget director. The pick was supposed to give the president credibility with the conservative House Freedom Caucus.

Once in the White House, Mulvaney evolved quickly into a Trump-minded political figure, backing the president’s big-debt vision and accepting that many of the spending cuts he had spent years demanding as a congressman would never come to fruition under a Trump administration.

Mulvaney put out a budget proposal last year that fell short of eliminating the deficit — something once considered sacrilegious for members of the House Freedom Caucus, which he co-founded several years ago.

“He’s been gung-ho on everything the president has tried to do,” said Steve Bell, a former Republican staff director on the Senate Budget Committee. “He’s put out budgets that he probably knew were incoherent because the president asked him to. And he’ll probably do whatever the president asks him to do. On the positive side, he’ll be a very good liaison with House Republicans.”

But Mulvaney has virtually no credibility with congressional Democrats, many of whom scoffed when he helped Trump add $2 trillion to the debt over the past two years. Mulvaney had been part of the leading group of Republicans that called for severe spending cuts and deficit reduction, even helping lead a government shutdown in 2013.

“Based on Mulvaney’s history both at OMB and his closeness to Trump, I don’t see how this helps with Democrats or improves some sort of a bipartisan process on key issues,” said Jared Bernstein, who was chief economist to former vice president Joe Biden. “He’s a hardcore Trump supporter, far more than many others in the administration, which is saying a lot.”

Trump had temporarily installed Mulvaney at the CFPB, which was created during the Obama administration and which he sought to shrink by cutting its budget and stripping back its regulatory reach.

Perhaps helping Mulvaney’s prospects in the new job, he established himself as one of the most detail-oriented officials during key moments. He developed a deep knowledge of the intricacies of numerous government programs and was unashamed to push back on any criticism that the Trump administration attracted.

Mulvaney defended, for example, the White House’s decision to call for cuts on food assistance for the elderly and young children, claiming there was little evidence these programs worked.

As chief of staff, he will have to have an even broader mandate, dealing with both domestic and international issues, not to mention the proclivities of Trump, who likes to make phone calls on his own without being told who to speak to or when.

Mulvaney is well-liked within the White House among a number of different factions. He was able to befriend both hard-line conservatives and more centrist advisers, striking up a friendship with former National Economic Council director Gary Cohn that helped them both navigate last year’s tax cut fight.

In Congress, Mulvaney was a vocal deficit hawk, but he oversaw a dramatic expansion of the deficit during his time at the White House — in part because of a big increase in spending as well last year’s tax cut law. Deficits are now approaching $1 trillion a year, an unusually large sum during an economic expansion.

Mulvaney has said he still favors reducing the deficit but that it is impossible with the current political dynamic in Washington, largely blaming Senate Democrats for failing to agree to any reductions.

But Trump himself has shown little interest in reducing the deficit, something Mulvaney has acknowledged. Last year, Mulvaney inquired whether Trump would be open to making cuts to Medicare or Social Security as part of a broader budget deal, and Trump rejected the idea.

Mulvaney has attracted scrutiny since joining the White House. He told a group of banking executives earlier this year that, while in Congress, he gave preference to lobbyists who contributed to him financially, according to a report in the New York Times.

Philip.Rucker@washpost.com

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...te-house-chief-of-staff/ar-BBQYafP?ocid=ientp
 

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Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to leave at year's end

The Hill
Timothy Cama and Miranda Green
12 mins ago


Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke resigned Saturday amid growing controversy over allegations that he violated ethics rules.

David Bernhardt, the deputy Interior secretary, is expected take over as acting secretary.

Bernhardt has been the point person on numerous major Interior initiatives, such as changes to the Endangered Species Act and efforts to start drilling for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. He is widely expected to continue similar policies as Zinke, though perhaps with a different tone.

Zinke's departure as head of the agency that oversees federal land, wildlife, American Indian relations comes as Democrats prepare to take over as the majority in the House, where they'll have subpoena power for investigations.

Rep. Raul Grijalva (D-Ariz.), the presumptive incoming chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee, which has oversight of the Interior Department, had promised to use his gavel to compel Zinke to testify about the accusations against him and to subpoena records related to the allegations.

Zinke, a former Montana congressman, has been under scrutiny for a land deal involving a foundation he led and a company backed by David Lesar, chairman of oilfield services company Halliburton.

Interior's Office of Inspector General (OIG) referred its probe into the deal to the Department of Justice for potential prosecution of conflict-of-interest laws. Zinke denied any wrongdoing.

That referral came at least a week before Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Ben Carson announced to staff that Suzanne Israel Tufts, a Trump political appointee at HUD, was going to replace Interior's acting inspector general. The Hill first reported the shakeup in October. Interior later denied the report and HUD said it was a miscommunication.

Critics raised suspicions about the timing of the two events. Grijalva said he would like to probe the nature of the attempted OIG replacement when he takes control as committee chairman next year.

The timing "can't be dismissed as merely a coincidence," Grijalva told Bloomberg. "That's why the oversight is so necessary."

President Trump told reporters on Nov. 7 that he was looking into the complaints against Zinke and expected to come to a conclusion in the near future.

When asked if he planned to fire the Interior head, he told reporters, "No."

Zinke was facing a handful of other investigations by the OIG, including probes into whether he improperly blocked an American Indian casino project after a competitor's lobbying and whether he broke ethics rules by redrawing a Utah national monument in a way that benefited a state lawmaker.

The OIG also found that Zinke violated department policies by letting his wife travel in government vehicles. Investigators largely cleared him of potential violations related to his official travel, including flying on a jet owned by an oil executive and using a private plane on a trip that included a political fundraiser.

The Interior Secretary was no stranger to controversy after taking office in March 2017.

His government spending raised eyebrows after reports surfaced that he created battle coins to hand out to guests, asked for a specially designed secretarial flag to be flown above Interior's headquarters when he was present and spent thousands of taxpayer dollars to replace his office's balcony door.

He was also questioned for his use of charter flights, including one to Montana after a private engagement with the Las Vegas Golden Knights hockey team. An Interior ethics official signed off on the event and charter travel but was unaware that the owner of the hockey team was a former campaign donor. The OIG ruled that the use of the flight was avoidable.

Similar spending and ethics issues contributed to the departure of other former Trump administration officials, such as Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt and Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price.

Zinke ruffled feathers with some of his policies, including one that reduced the boundaries of two national monuments. He also expanded offshore oil drilling, weakened protections for endangered species and reversed an Obama-era ban on elephant and lion hunting trophy imports.

Zinke was central to the Trump administration's "Energy Dominance" agenda, which aims to dramatically increase production of oil, natural gas and coal, mainly by loosening regulations for production and use.

"I don't ever want to be held hostage by a foreign entity over energy needs. I don't want to send your kids, my kids, on foreign shores to fight for energy," Zinke, a former Navy SEAL, told Fox Business Network in September. "And environmentally, it is best to produce energy in this country under reasonable regulation than to watch it get produced overseas with no regulation."

One of Zinke's first acts after joining the Cabinet was to repeal a moratorium the Obama administration had put on new coal-mining leases on federal land, which was implemented to enable a study of the climate change implications of mining. He later announced that Interior would be looking into expanding offshore drilling in federal waters - a move opposed by almost every coastal state.

Under his leadership, Interior repealed Obama-era standards meant to reduce methane pollution from oil and gas drilling on federal land, in addition to working to repeal regulations on fracking.

Zinke led the Trump administration's review of national monument protections, which resulted in Trump's decisions to slash the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument's size by about half, and the Bears Ears National Monument by about 85 percent. Both protected areas are in southern Utah.

Interior under Zinke pursued numerous policies to change how the Endangered Species Act is implemented, including reducing protections for threatened species and making it harder to protect habitat. The department declared in a legal memo that it would not punish companies that "incidentally" kill or harm migratory birds under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

At the same time, Zinke sought to frame himself as a conservationist second only to former President Theodore Roosevelt, who used his position to protect natural areas.

"Interior represents the people. And when it comes to public lands, you look at the Teddy Roosevelt Arch when you enter the park: 'For the benefit and enjoyment of the people,'" Zinke told a Montana radio show in October, referring to an entrance to Yellowstone National Park. "So it's the people's lands, we should take care of it."

In October, Zinke oversaw the establishment of Trump's first national monument, at Camp Nelson in Kentucky. He also worked to improve access to federal land by hunters and fishermen as part of a wide-ranging agenda to boost hunting. In a similar vein, he worked to create two controversial pro-hunting advisory committees filled predominantly by representatives of pro-gun and sport shooting groups.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...e-to-leave-at-years-end/ar-BBQZhUM?ocid=ientp
 

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'I think he is a terrible human being': Embarrassment for Trump's new chief of staff Mick Mulvaney as video emerges of him revealing his contempt for the President during 2016 election campaign

  • Trump named his budget director Mick Mulvaney as acting chief of staff Friday
  • Video emerged soon after showing Mulvaney criticizing Trump in 2016
  • Then-congressmen said he supported Trump although he is 'terrible human'
  • Trump suggested the new role is temporary but a White House official indicated to reporters that Mulvaney will stay in the job indefinitely
  • Trump was left scrambling after he was unexpectedly turned down by Mike Pence chief of staff Nick Ayers to fill the job of outgoing John Kelly
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...ick-Mulvaney-called-terrible-human-being.html
 

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ANOTHER attack on Trump by his new chief of staff is revealed: Mick Mulvaney said Trump would be 'disqualified' from office in an 'ordinary universe' before the 2016 election

  • Trump named his budget director Mick Mulvaney as acting chief of staff
  • Video emerged soon after showing Mulvaney criticizing Trump in 2016
  • Said in radio interview Trump wouldn't be 'role model for my 16-year-old triplets'
  • Said in 'ordinary universe' Trump would be disqualified
  • Spoke after release of infamous 'p****' tape
  • Actually made the comments while making case for Trump over Clinton
  • Then-congressmen also said supported Trump although he is 'terrible human'
  • Also said he 'is not a very good person'
  • Trump suggested the new role is temporary but a White House official indicated to reporters that Mulvaney will stay in the job indefinitely
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...mp-disqualified-office-ordinary-universe.html
 

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Zinke’s Departure Puts U.S. Interior in Hands of Former Oil Lobbyist
December 17, 2018 by Bloomberg



Harris Hamdan / Shutterstock

By Jennifer A. Dlouhy (Bloomberg) — A former lobbyist who has played a leading, behind-the-scenes role at the Interior Department driving Trump administration policies to expand drilling and strip wildlife protections is poised to take over the agency at least temporarily.

David Bernhardt is expected to be named acting Interior secretary by President Donald Trump, following the resignation of current chief Ryan Zinke, which was announced Saturday.

The leadership shuffle may be more of a change in style than substance at Interior, an $11 billion agency with some 70,000 workers and responsibility overseeing drilling, grazing and other activities on public land and in federal waters. The National Park Service, Fish and Wildlife Service and Bureau of Land Management are units of the department.

The Senate confirmed Bernhardt for his current job by a narrow 53-43 vote, raising the possibility he’d face a tough confirmation fight if Trump were to nominate him to formally lead Interior. The White House has been considering a raft of potential nominees, and Trump on Saturday said he would name a new secretary this week.

Even without Senate confirmation, Bernhardt could potentially serve as acting secretary for years with virtually no limits on his power.

Unlike Zinke, a former Navy SEAL who rode a horse to the Interior Department’s offices on his first day on the job and had a secretarial flag hoisted whenever he was inside the agency’s headquarters, Bernhardt, 49, avoids the spotlight.

His profile is so low, in fact, that though he led a review of conservation plans for the endangered sage grouse, his name barely shows up in thousands of pages of Interior Department documents from the effort. Bernhardt’s public calendars also are devoid of detail about who he’s meeting with or why.

“In some ways, Bernhardt is hiding in plain sight,” said Kate Kelly, public lands director for the Center for American Progress, which has opposed some Interior actions taken under Trump and Zinke. “He is a central figure in all of the highest profile issues that the Interior Department is working on, but we know next to nothing about who he is meeting with and what he is doing to advance those priorities.”

Hard Working
Bernhardt’s supporters and critics alike describe him as a smart, hard-working lawyer who strategically and methodically advances his goals, often finding ways to use the bureaucracy to his advantage.

“One of the major assets he has in any job he has ever had is an ability to figure out the bureaucracy and understand process better than others,” said Jon Hrobsky, an attorney who worked with Bernhardt during the Bush administration.

Most of Bernhardt’s professional life has been tied to Interior — either working inside the agency or lobbying it from the outside. After a stint at Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck LLP, Bernhardt went to work for former President George W. Bush’s Interior Department in 2001, eventually becoming the agency’s top lawyer in 2006.

When President Barack Obama took office in 2009, Bernhardt returned to his old firm, where he worked on behalf of oil companies and developers with business before his former agency. Bernhardt’s client list included affiliates of Noble Energy Inc., a major Gulf of Mexico oil producer; Equinor ASA, the Norwegian company seeking to build a wind farm off the New York coast; and Halliburton Co., the world’s largest oilfield services provider.

Bernhardt challenged protections for endangered salmon on behalf of California’s Westlands Water District. He lobbied for a proposed copper mine near Tucson, Arizona, on behalf of Rosemont Copper Co. And he fought a deep-water drilling ban in the Gulf of Mexico on behalf of Cobalt International Energy Inc. Bernhardt also represented Alaska in a 2014 lawsuit against the Interior Department that sought to allow oil exploration in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

When Bernhardt became Interior’s deputy secretary in August 2017, he pledged to recuse himself from matters involving some former clients for at least a year. He described a scrupulous process to steer clear of potential conflicts in an interview with Bloomberg News, including listing companies to avoid on a pocket-sized card and in a memo to staff.

But critics note that Bernhardt’s former clients have been getting much of what they want out of the agency since he came on board.

Dramatic Windfalls
“It is noteworthy that many of the deputy secretary’s former clients began receiving sudden and dramatic windfalls only months after his swearing in,” the Western Values Project, an environmental advocacy group, said in a federal lawsuit seeking release of agency documents related to Bernhardt.

The group says one of the companies “receiving regulatory bounties” from Interior is Cadiz Inc., a developer that aims to build a 43-mile (69 kilometer) pipeline to pump water from a Mojave Desert aquifer to thirsty Southern California. The Obama administration blocked the project, but Trump’s Interior Department withdrew legal obstacles and told the Los Angeles developer the federal government’s permission wasn’t necessary after all.

Bernhardt’s former law firm stands to earn millions of dollars if the pipeline gets built, according to filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Bernhardt says he didn’t participate in the decision and won’t benefit financially from the policy reversal.

Petroleum Association
Another former Bernhardt client benefiting from recent Interior decisions is the Independent Petroleum Association of America, an oil industry trade group that pushed to weaken protections for the chicken-like sage grouse, and backed new guidance that accidental killings of migratory birds wouldn’t be considered a violation of a federal law. And under the president’s professed “energy dominance” agenda, the oil industry has broadly benefited from Trump administration decisions.

“David Bernhardt has an industrial scale conflict of interest with the extraction industry,” said Chris Saeger, director of the Western Values Project, which has criticized Interior’s actions under Zinke. Although decisions about federal land development should be balanced, Seager said, Bernhardt “has overwhelmingly favored the special interests he used to work for at the expense of others.”

Bernhardt has witnessed first-hand the deep impact of government decisions on private enterprise, having grown up in the small cattle-ranching town of Rifle, Colorado, which was roiled by a boom and bust tied to a failed U.S. venture to produce fuel from nearby oil shale deposits.

Endangered Species
One of his top priorities at Interior has been revamping the way the U.S. protects vulnerable animals under the Endangered Species Act. Conservationists blasted a Trump proposal championed by Bernhardt to allow economic considerations to factor into wildlife protection decisions under the law. But Bernhardt has defended the approach, arguing that the government has too often pursued protections without regard for the potential cost to landowners and businesses.

It’s an issue Bernhardt knows well, having been in charge of a 2008 Interior Department rule declaring the polar bear threatened with extinction because global warming was causing its sea ice habitat to melt. It was a fraught exercise: corporate interests such as the Coca-Cola Co. weighed in; Interior officials were divided; White House officials held strong views. Colleagues recall Bernhardt sleeping in his office for several nights working on the issue.

But Bernhardt adeptly navigated the terrain, ultimately relying on rarely used federal authority to impose specially tailored requirements to help protect the iconic animal.

Vacancies Law
“David had to figure out ‘how do I navigate this, be intellectually honest and give the secretary and White House an outcome everybody could feel good about?”’ said Hrobsky. “You just wonder how many other humans could have pulled that off.”

Bernhardt’s time as acting secretary is initially limited to 210 days under a federal vacancies law. But that clock gets paused if Trump nominates someone for the secretary job — and it can stay that way for two years while a nomination is pending before the Senate.

Potential candidates for permanent secretaries include Republicans who could aid Trump in a re-election bid two years from now: Raul Labrador, an Idaho Representative who’s leaving Congress; outgoing Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker; and former Nevada Senator Dean Heller, who lost his re-election bid in November.

Bernhardt also could be selected.

“The one thing that could prevent him from being nominated for permanent spot is that Trump wants surrogates on the campaign trail in 2020,” said Stephen Brown, an oil industry consultant who previously lobbied for Andeavor. “David does not have political campaigning in his DNA.”

© 2018 Bloomberg L.P

https://gcaptain.com/zinkes-departure-puts-interior-in-hands-of-former-oil-lobbyist/
 

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Defense Secretary Jim Mattis flames Trump for deserting allies as he announces he will RESIGN in February – just one day after president ordered Syria troop pullout over his objections

  • Mattis, a retired Marine Corps general, has been Trump's only defense secretary
  • President says he'll leave in February, 'retiring with distinction'
  • The move comes just a day after Trump announced a military pullout from Syria
  • Mattis reportedly objected to the drawdown; ISIS still has 30,000 fighters
  • Trump hinted in October that Mattis might leave, calling him 'sort of a Democrat'
  • In a resignation letter, Mattis said he would leave so Trump could have someone in the job who more closely agreed with him
  • Democrats in Congress pilloried Trump and lamented that one of the few 'adults in the room' would be leaving
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...chief-Jim-Mad-Dog-Mattis-retire-February.html
 

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*This vid is from CNN.

Mattis quits, says his views aren't 'aligned' with Trump's
CNN


Published on Dec 20, 2018
Defense Secretary James Mattis has announced his resignation, one day after President Donald Trump's plans to withdraw troops from Syria became public. CNN's Barbara Starr reports. #CNN #News
 

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The Resignation of General "Mad Dog" Mattis
Warrior Poet Society


Published on Dec 20, 2018
Secretary of Defense, General Mattis resigned earlier today (Dec 20, 2018). In this video I read General Mattis' resignation letter, talk about why this is very bad, and then finish up on more of an upbeat note by reading some of General Mattis' most famous quotes.
 

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A Top Aide’s Exit Plan Raises Eyebrows in the White House


NYT
By MAGGIE HABERMAN and NICHOLAS FANDOS
7 hrs ago


WASHINGTON — After weeks of discussions about his future, Zachary D. Fuentes, the 36-year-old deputy White House chief of staff, had a plan.

Mr. Fuentes told colleagues that after his mentor, John F. Kelly, left his job as chief of staff at the end of the year, he would “hide out” at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, adjacent to the White House, for six months, remaining on the payroll in a nebulous role. Then, in July, when he had completed 19 years of service in the Coast Guard, Mr. Fuentes — an active-duty officer — would take advantage of an early retirement program.

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The program, referred to as temporary early retirement authority, had lapsed for Coast Guard officials at the end of the 2018 fiscal year, and, according to people briefed on the discussions, Department of Homeland Security officials began pressing Congress in November to reinstate it. Administration officials said they had been told that Mr. Fuentes discussed the program with officials at the Department of Homeland Security, and after reporters raised questions with lawmakers of both parties, a provision to reinstate it was abruptly pulled from a House bill on Wednesday.

The White House declined to answer questions about whether Mr. Fuentes had pressed to have the program restarted, saying only that he planned to remain on for a time as a senior adviser to aid in the transition to a new chief of staff. But in interviews, nearly a dozen White House and administration aides, none of whom would speak on the record, raised concerns about how they believed Mr. Fuentes planned to use government resources in the coming months.

Mr. Fuentes has become one of the most controversial aides inside the West Wing, earning nicknames like “Zotus” (Zach of the United States) and “prime minister” for his approach to other White House officials. Even before Mr. Kelly was asked by Mr. Trump this month to leave, Mr. Fuentes had been looking for a way out, after the president had begun to sour on him. For weeks, Mr. Trump has complained about both Mr. Kelly and Mr. Fuentes, primarily over the debacle of the president’s canceled visit to an American military cemetery near Paris in November.

Once Mr. Fuentes’s six-month plan came to light, several administration officials cautioned that it would almost certainly get attention and create negative headlines for the administration. Now, his path out is unclear.

Mr. Fuentes previously worked as a military aide to Mr. Kelly when he was the secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. The department, which includes the Coast Guard, is now led by Kirstjen Nielsen, who had held Mr. Fuentes’s role at the White House until Mr. Kelly pushed for Mr. Trump to name her as the Homeland Security secretary.

The Coast Guard instituted the early retirement program five years ago to align with ones in other branches of the armed forces, which used the authority to help control the size of their forces. The program allowed the agency to grant early retirement with partial benefits to limited numbers of officers and enlisted service members with fewer than the standard 20 years of service.

The Coast Guard used the authority sparingly in recent years, granting early retirement with benefits to only 90 or so officers. When Congress earlier this year wrote legislation reauthorizing the agency, the Coast Guard initially did not include an extension of the program among a list of requests, according to government officials familiar with the exchange.

Only in November, as the bill was closed to changes and winding its way to passage, did the agency add an extension of the authority to its wish list. Mr. Trump signed it into law on Dec. 4 without the early retirement program included.

Instead, the extension through 2019 was packaged with a list of otherwise noncontroversial technical corrections to the bill this month. In explaining the request, Coast Guard officials cited the need for parity with other armed forces. They also told the policy writers that there might be an immediate need for the authority, and that it would be used, at most, for 10 individuals, all officers, the government officials said.

Coast Guard officials insisted that an extension of the program had been requested several months ago, and they took issue with the idea that it was done to help any single person. But a congressional official said lawmakers had received a written request on Nov. 19 to have it restored.

Representative Bill Shuster of Pennsylvania, the retiring chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, accepted the requested changes and this week introduced legislation in the House that would codify them into law. House lawmakers were preparing to push the package through the chamber on Wednesday, but confronted with questions about the early retirement extension, they decided to pull just the provision to ensure that the rest of the technical changes could become law.

As Mr. Kelly’s closest aide, Mr. Fuentes has wielded disproportionate power in the Trump White House. He has influenced a number of personnel decisions, and has frequently traveled with Mr. Trump as part of a rotation of deputy chiefs of staff.

Attention has focused on Mr. Fuentes since Mr. Trump came under sharp criticism for canceling his appearance at an American military cemetery near Paris to mark the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, a move that was ostensibly made because of rainy weather.

Public accounts at the time said Mr. Fuentes had merely delivered the news to Mr. Trump that officials said the weather made it too difficult to fly the presidential helicopter, Marine One, the 50 miles from Paris to the cemetery.

But two people with direct knowledge of the events said that Mr. Fuentes had decided on his own, well before the military aide on duty made a determination, to tell the president that the weather was too poor to travel by helicopter.

Mr. Trump could have traveled by motorcade, but those familiar with the discussions said that Mr. Fuentes told the president that it would not be a problem if Mr. Kelly went without Mr. Trump.

Mr. Trump was savaged in the news media for skipping the cemetery visit, a fact that he blamed on Mr. Kelly, even though other aides repeatedly told him that it had been Mr. Fuentes’s doing, according to the people with knowledge of what took place.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/a-top-aide’s-exit-plan-raises-eyebrows-in-the-white-house/ar-BBReMfL?ocid=ientp
 

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SECRETARY OF DEFENSE GENERAL MATTIS RESIGNS?!
NICKY MGTV


Published on Dec 21, 2018
This video I discuss the impact Secretary of Defense James Mattis a retired General Marine Corps officer has stepped down and resigned from his position. None of these views are negative towards my president or their relationship, but rather a third party view and analytical analysis of how qualified he was as SECDEF and his ability to be a great leader for our military.

Want to help the channel grow for more informational content?

go to patreon.com/nickmgtv
 

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Trump's staffing is like a revolving door. I'm trying to figure out why this is a good thing!