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Why So Many Believe The Moon Landing Was A Hoax

GOLDBRIX

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#41

Unca Walt

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#43


The people who continually promulgate studied ignorance for whatever ego reason use the same "eyes wide shut" technique. Just keep repeating bullshit and crazy conclusions all over the internet. Not everyone has the instant answer for the last posted LIE, so they wonder for a while.

Being unaware of how the rover was unloaded is NOT reason to call the whole fucking space program moon-landings a sham. Especially when the freaking method is available to the "eyes wide shut" types whose only exercise is to jump to the conclusion that they can claim they were tricked by several million people.

Being unaware of what a NON-cropped photo of an "exposed cable" is doing in a moon surface picture is NOT reason to yadayadyada.

But again and again the pushers of this shit keep it up. They are all either trolls, or impervious to truth (eyes wide shut).

A conspiracy of MILLIONS against a couple of dozen seemingly fantastically important people who must be tricked.

Sheesh.
 

GOLDBRIX

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#44

GOLDBRIX

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#46
It takes 50 years to get the entire story of the mission. It did not go as smoothly as we were led to believe. Here are some excerpts:
"...For the next three minutes, the cratered lunar landscape grew closer, until, at around 46,000 feet, Armstrong rotated the vehicle, pointing the landing radar toward the surface while the astronauts turned to face Earth. The moon’s gravity is irregular, and to account for this, the astronauts had to take new measurements. With the void outside his window, Aldrin punched in a request to compare the lander’s calculated position with the reading from the radar.
He was answered by a klaxon ringing in his earpiece. Aldrin hurriedly keyed in the two-digit code 5-9-Enter, which translated, roughly, as “display alarm.” The console responded with error code “1202.” Despite his months of simulations, Aldrin didn’t know what this one meant; Armstrong, equally baffled, radioed Mission Control for clarification. The stress in his voice was audible, but only later would the two men learn how bad things really were. In that critical moment, hurtling like a lawn dart toward the surface of the moon, the Apollo guidance computer had crashed. .....
In the next three minutes, the lander dropped roughly 20,000 feet. Scanning the moon’s desolate surface, Armstrong began to make out features in the lunar plain. (Apollo planners had timed the landing so the sun would cast long shadows on the rocks.) The computer automatically entered the next phase of the descent, followed by another reboot and another go command from Mission Control until finally, at less than 2,000 feet above the lunar surface, the computer had its worst crash yet.
The alarm blared and the lander’s readout went dead. For 10 long seconds, the console displayed nothing—no altitude data, no error codes, just three blank fields. Armstrong’s heart began to race, rising to 150 beats per minute, the same as that of a man at the end of a sprint. With the moonscape zipping by outside his window, he was the closest any human had ever been to another world, but, like a distracted driver, his attention was focused on the computer. Finally the console came back on line. Mission Control confirmed: It was another 1202. “I never expected it to come back,” Armstrong later said.
The alarm subsided, but just seconds later came another reboot, another dropout of the display, this last one just 800 feet or so above the surface. That made five crashes in four minutes, but the go commands from Houston kept coming. The controllers had put their faith in the box on the wall. “An abort is not that safe either, and the lower you go, the less safe it becomes,” Bales told me. “There was an unspoken assumption, I think, that anywhere below 1,000 feet, Armstrong was gonna take a shot at it.” ....
Armstrong had had his wings clipped over Korea; he’d bounced an airplane off the upper atmosphere; he’d rescued Gemini 8 from a violent zero-gravity spin. Now he was piloting a malfunctioning spacecraft to touch down on an alien world.
Just 40 seconds after the computer’s final restart, he slowed the lander’s forward momentum, then rotated the legs toward the surface. As the engine kicked up a blinding cloud of dust, Aldrin read aloud a steady stream of figures from the console. With almost no fuel to spare, the lander dropped, in slow motion, to kiss the surface upright, and the particles of moondust hung suspended in the sunlight until the gentle lunar gravity pulled them back to rest. ....
The MIT team located the source of the error with only two or three hours to spare. In anticipation of a possible abort, Aldrin had insisted that the spacecraft’s rendezvous radar remain turned on. This system pointed upward, allowing it to track Collins in the command module. During the descent, the dial for the rendezvous radar had been turned to the wrong setting. Normally, this shouldn’t have caused a problem. But because of a design defect, every once in a while the system would bombard the computer with unnecessary requests. It was the worst kind of error: erratic, subtly dangerous, and difficult to reproduce."....

More here: https://www.wired.com/story/apollo-11-mission-out-of-control/

OBTW: During the exiting or re-entering of the lunar vehicle a RESET switch broke off. The switch released the landing gear from the module for the return flight to the Command Module. With just seconds left before the lift-off Buzz Ardren used a felt-tipped pen, push it into the broked switch hole and unlocked the two units.

We the People did not hear about these issues. Leading the Gen. Pop. to believe everything went perfectly as planned. It has NOT.
 
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the_shootist

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#50
IT WASN'T. The Lunar Rover was packed and carried on the outside of the LEM:
View attachment 136754

READ MORE AT : https://www.popsci.com/blog-network/vintage-space/lunar-rover-designing-and-unpacking-car-moon/


GEESH!!! "Those who fail to learn history are doomed to repeat it". :bang head:
That drawing and this information:

The folded rover was anchored to the LM at one upper central strut on the lander’s body and to two points on its lower portion. Keeping it in this stowed position was a system of cables, shock absorbers, pin retract mechanisms, telescoping tubes, push—off rods, and a handful of other minor gears all designed so one astronaut could unpack the vehicle alone.

That's the 'proof'?
 

Unca Walt

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#51
It takes 50 years to get the entire story of the mission. It did not go as smoothly as we were led to believe. Here are some excerpts:
"...For the next three minutes, the cratered lunar landscape grew closer, until, at around 46,000 feet, Armstrong rotated the vehicle, pointing the landing radar toward the surface while the astronauts turned to face Earth. The moon’s gravity is irregular, and to account for this, the astronauts had to take new measurements. With the void outside his window, Aldrin punched in a request to compare the lander’s calculated position with the reading from the radar.
He was answered by a klaxon ringing in his earpiece. Aldrin hurriedly keyed in the two-digit code 5-9-Enter, which translated, roughly, as “display alarm.” The console responded with error code “1202.” Despite his months of simulations, Aldrin didn’t know what this one meant; Armstrong, equally baffled, radioed Mission Control for clarification. The stress in his voice was audible, but only later would the two men learn how bad things really were. In that critical moment, hurtling like a lawn dart toward the surface of the moon, the Apollo guidance computer had crashed. .....
In the next three minutes, the lander dropped roughly 20,000 feet. Scanning the moon’s desolate surface, Armstrong began to make out features in the lunar plain. (Apollo planners had timed the landing so the sun would cast long shadows on the rocks.) The computer automatically entered the next phase of the descent, followed by another reboot and another go command from Mission Control until finally, at less than 2,000 feet above the lunar surface, the computer had its worst crash yet.
The alarm blared and the lander’s readout went dead. For 10 long seconds, the console displayed nothing—no altitude data, no error codes, just three blank fields. Armstrong’s heart began to race, rising to 150 beats per minute, the same as that of a man at the end of a sprint. With the moonscape zipping by outside his window, he was the closest any human had ever been to another world, but, like a distracted driver, his attention was focused on the computer. Finally the console came back on line. Mission Control confirmed: It was another 1202. “I never expected it to come back,” Armstrong later said.
The alarm subsided, but just seconds later came another reboot, another dropout of the display, this last one just 800 feet or so above the surface. That made five crashes in four minutes, but the go commands from Houston kept coming. The controllers had put their faith in the box on the wall. “An abort is not that safe either, and the lower you go, the less safe it becomes,” Bales told me. “There was an unspoken assumption, I think, that anywhere below 1,000 feet, Armstrong was gonna take a shot at it.” ....
Armstrong had had his wings clipped over Korea; he’d bounced an airplane off the upper atmosphere; he’d rescued Gemini 8 from a violent zero-gravity spin. Now he was piloting a malfunctioning spacecraft to touch down on an alien world.
Just 40 seconds after the computer’s final restart, he slowed the lander’s forward momentum, then rotated the legs toward the surface. As the engine kicked up a blinding cloud of dust, Aldrin read aloud a steady stream of figures from the console. With almost no fuel to spare, the lander dropped, in slow motion, to kiss the surface upright, and the particles of moondust hung suspended in the sunlight until the gentle lunar gravity pulled them back to rest. ....
The MIT team located the source of the error with only two or three hours to spare. In anticipation of a possible abort, Aldrin had insisted that the spacecraft’s rendezvous radar remain turned on. This system pointed upward, allowing it to track Collins in the command module. During the descent, the dial for the rendezvous radar had been turned to the wrong setting. Normally, this shouldn’t have caused a problem. But because of a design defect, every once in a while the system would bombard the computer with unnecessary requests. It was the worst kind of error: erratic, subtly dangerous, and difficult to reproduce."....

More here: https://www.wired.com/story/apollo-11-mission-out-of-control/

OBTW: During the exiting or re-entering of the lunar vehicle a RESET switch broke off. The switch released the landing gear from the module for the return flight to the Command Module. With just seconds left before the lift-off Buzz Ardren used a felt-tipped pen, push it into the broked switch hole and unlocked the two units.

We the People did not hear about these issues. Leading the Gen. Pop. to believe everything went perfectly as planned. It has NOT.
CRIKEY!!

That had me on the edge of my seat!!

I had no fargin idea the landing was such a washer-biter. I actually watched that landing, and still remember the guy in CapCom talking about how "everyone had been holding their breath". <-- Kinda thought the reaction was off, somehow. Shrugged it off as everyone in CapCom was shrieking and smiling.

Turns out, they knew. Jeez.
 

Juristic Person

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#52
CRIKEY!!

That had me on the edge of my seat!!

I had no fargin idea the landing was such a washer-biter. I actually watched that landing, and still remember the guy in CapCom talking about how "everyone had been holding their breath". <-- Kinda thought the reaction was off, somehow. Shrugged it off as everyone in CapCom was shrieking and smiling.

Turns out, they knew. Jeez.
Amazing how when yo play back the moon walk videos at 2x speed, it looks just like they are running around and jumping and driving on Earth. What a coinkydink!
 

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#53
It takes 50 years to get the entire story of the mission. It did not go as smoothly as we were led to believe. Here are some excerpts:
"...For the next three minutes, the cratered lunar landscape grew closer, until, at around 46,000 feet, Armstrong rotated the vehicle, pointing the landing radar toward the surface while the astronauts turned to face Earth. The moon’s gravity is irregular, and to account for this, the astronauts had to take new measurements. With the void outside his window, Aldrin punched in a request to compare the lander’s calculated position with the reading from the radar.
He was answered by a klaxon ringing in his earpiece. Aldrin hurriedly keyed in the two-digit code 5-9-Enter, which translated, roughly, as “display alarm.” The console responded with error code “1202.” Despite his months of simulations, Aldrin didn’t know what this one meant; Armstrong, equally baffled, radioed Mission Control for clarification. The stress in his voice was audible, but only later would the two men learn how bad things really were. In that critical moment, hurtling like a lawn dart toward the surface of the moon, the Apollo guidance computer had crashed. .....
In the next three minutes, the lander dropped roughly 20,000 feet. Scanning the moon’s desolate surface, Armstrong began to make out features in the lunar plain. (Apollo planners had timed the landing so the sun would cast long shadows on the rocks.) The computer automatically entered the next phase of the descent, followed by another reboot and another go command from Mission Control until finally, at less than 2,000 feet above the lunar surface, the computer had its worst crash yet.
The alarm blared and the lander’s readout went dead. For 10 long seconds, the console displayed nothing—no altitude data, no error codes, just three blank fields. Armstrong’s heart began to race, rising to 150 beats per minute, the same as that of a man at the end of a sprint. With the moonscape zipping by outside his window, he was the closest any human had ever been to another world, but, like a distracted driver, his attention was focused on the computer. Finally the console came back on line. Mission Control confirmed: It was another 1202. “I never expected it to come back,” Armstrong later said.
The alarm subsided, but just seconds later came another reboot, another dropout of the display, this last one just 800 feet or so above the surface. That made five crashes in four minutes, but the go commands from Houston kept coming. The controllers had put their faith in the box on the wall. “An abort is not that safe either, and the lower you go, the less safe it becomes,” Bales told me. “There was an unspoken assumption, I think, that anywhere below 1,000 feet, Armstrong was gonna take a shot at it.” ....
Armstrong had had his wings clipped over Korea; he’d bounced an airplane off the upper atmosphere; he’d rescued Gemini 8 from a violent zero-gravity spin. Now he was piloting a malfunctioning spacecraft to touch down on an alien world.
Just 40 seconds after the computer’s final restart, he slowed the lander’s forward momentum, then rotated the legs toward the surface. As the engine kicked up a blinding cloud of dust, Aldrin read aloud a steady stream of figures from the console. With almost no fuel to spare, the lander dropped, in slow motion, to kiss the surface upright, and the particles of moondust hung suspended in the sunlight until the gentle lunar gravity pulled them back to rest. ....
The MIT team located the source of the error with only two or three hours to spare. In anticipation of a possible abort, Aldrin had insisted that the spacecraft’s rendezvous radar remain turned on. This system pointed upward, allowing it to track Collins in the command module. During the descent, the dial for the rendezvous radar had been turned to the wrong setting. Normally, this shouldn’t have caused a problem. But because of a design defect, every once in a while the system would bombard the computer with unnecessary requests. It was the worst kind of error: erratic, subtly dangerous, and difficult to reproduce."....

More here: https://www.wired.com/story/apollo-11-mission-out-of-control/

OBTW: During the exiting or re-entering of the lunar vehicle a RESET switch broke off. The switch released the landing gear from the module for the return flight to the Command Module. With just seconds left before the lift-off Buzz Ardren used a felt-tipped pen, push it into the broked switch hole and unlocked the two units.

We the People did not hear about these issues. Leading the Gen. Pop. to believe everything went perfectly as planned. It has NOT.
“It is commonly believed that man will fly directly from the earth to the moon, but to do this, we would require a vehicle of such gigantic proportions that it would prove an economic impossibility. It would have to develop sufficient speed to penetrate the atmosphere and overcome the earth’s gravity and, having traveled all the way to the moon, it must still have enough fuel to land safely and make the return trip to earth. Furthermore, in order to give the expedition a margin of safety, we would not use one ship alone, but a minimum of three … each rocket ship would be taller than New York’s Empire State Building [almost ¼ mile high] and weigh about ten times the tonnage of the Queen Mary, or some 800,000 tons.”—Wernher von Braun, the father of the Apollo space program, writing in Conquest of the Moon

Waggin the Moondoggie Parts 1 - XIV

http://centerforaninformedamerica.com/moondoggie/
 

GOLDBRIX

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#55
I just think it was a waste of time and money.
As you type, talk or watch on a smart phone you can hold in your hand, drinking hot coffee in a disposable foam cup, or drink TANG, wearing Thinsulate materials , water proof yet breathable footwear in the winter,.....Just to name a few off the top of my head.
Each may not directly came from NASA but NASA was involved in each one's process.
Yep, a real waste [SARC]
 

GOLDBRIX

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#56
“It is commonly believed that man will fly directly from the earth to the moon, but to do this, we would require a vehicle of such gigantic proportions that it would prove an economic impossibility. It would have to develop sufficient speed to penetrate the atmosphere and overcome the earth’s gravity and, having traveled all the way to the moon, it must still have enough fuel to land safely and make the return trip to earth. Furthermore, in order to give the expedition a margin of safety, we would not use one ship alone, but a minimum of three … each rocket ship would be taller than New York’s Empire State Building [almost ¼ mile high] and weigh about ten times the tonnage of the Queen Mary, or some 800,000 tons.”—Wernher von Braun, the father of the Apollo space program, writing in Conquest of the Moon

Waggin the Moondoggie Parts 1 - XIV

http://centerforaninformedamerica.com/moondoggie/
Werner's Design of a Space Station never came to fruition as he dreamed, or the Saturn V to become the workhorse for American Space Exploration neither happened.
Technology and Budgets Change EVERYTHING.
 

keef

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#58
INTERNET MORON vs. REAL AMERICAN


"Are you HITTING ME !!??!!"
 

keef

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#59
As you type, talk or watch on a smart phone you can hold in your hand, drinking hot coffee in a disposable foam cup, or drink TANG, wearing Thinsulate materials , water proof yet breathable footwear in the winter,.....Just to name a few off the top of my head.
Each may not directly came from NASA but NASA was involved in each one's process.
Yep, a real waste [SARC]
They won't listen to you bro, as they are brainwashed Internet Morons.

And you are exactly right. My brother inlaw was working for Motorola (electrical engineer) in Shumburg, IL when his whole division was moved to Scottsdale AZ to work on the Apollo program in 1966. He has a signed plague from Richard Nixon for work he did on the mission (integrated circuits/communications). The guy could do anything from electronics to hydraulics. Had an IQ of 160 and started out fixing pin ball machines in Chicago as a kid and worked his way up.

They don't make Americans like that anymore.

My brother inlaw told me electrical engineers in that era were treated like rock stars. Today most American kids want to grow up to be a uTube poster. Most Chinese kids want to grow up to be an astronaut.

Tells ya all ya need to know.
 
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the_shootist

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#60
As you type, talk or watch on a smart phone you can hold in your hand, drinking hot coffee in a disposable foam cup, or drink TANG, wearing Thinsulate materials , water proof yet breathable footwear in the winter,.....Just to name a few off the top of my head.
Each may not directly came from NASA but NASA was involved in each one's process.
Yep, a real waste [SARC]
I agree with you 100% Nasa and the 'Space Program' was responsible for developing much of the tech we use regularly today. I just don't believe their rhetoric re: their accomplishments! Based on what I saw back in the 60's, coupled with what I've learned about government and the media since then, I'm no longer convinced that NASA put men on the Moon
 

BarnacleBob

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#61
As you type, talk or watch on a smart phone you can hold in your hand, drinking hot coffee in a disposable foam cup, or drink TANG, wearing Thinsulate materials , water proof yet breathable footwear in the winter,.....Just to name a few off the top of my head.
Each may not directly came from NASA but NASA was involved in each one's process.
Yep, a real waste [SARC]
It's called corporate welfare at the expense of the tax payer....Sure as hell they went to the moon & back, just like they say the Income Tax & SSI are voluntary....
 

Juristic Person

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#62
They won't listen to you bro, as they are brainwashed Internet Morons.

And you are exactly right. My brother inlaw was working for Motorola (electrical engineer) in Shumburg, IL when his whole division was moved to Scottsdale AZ to work on the Apollo program in 1966. He has a signed plague from Richard Nixon for work he did on the mission (integrated circuits/communications). The guy could do anything from electronics to hydraulics. Had an IQ of 160 and started out fixing pin ball machines in Chicago as a kid and worked his way up.

They don't make Americans like that anymore.

My brother inlaw told me electrical engineers in that era were treated like rock stars. Today most American kids want to grow up to be a uTube poster. Most Chinese kids want to grow up to be an astronaut.

Tells ya all ya need to know.
That actually doesn’t tell me anything other than that your brother was an engineer for Motorola. How is that proof that men walked on the moon?
 

Joe King

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#63
Rebooting NASA. This is a bit long at 24 minutes, but easy to watch/listen to. It covers the firing and replacement of a top NASA official who was seen by the administration as slowing things down.

I found it pretty interesting and I think that others here might find it interesting too. Bill brings up some good points as to why we haven't been back to the Moon.

 

Joe King

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This 1965 MIT Science Reporter television program features the Apollo guidance computer and navigation equipment, which involve less than 60 lbs of microcircuits and memory cores. Scientists and engineers Eldon Hall, Ramon Alonzo and Albert Hopkins (of the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory) and Jack Poundstone (Raytheon Space Division in Waltham MA) explain and demonstrate key features of the instruments, and detail project challenges such as controlling the trajectory of the spacecraft, the operation of the onboard telescope, and the computer construction and its memory. The program was presented by MIT in association with WGBH-TV Boston, and hosted by MIT reporter John Fitch; it was produced for NASA. MIT Museum Collections.


 

Joe King

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#69
This 1966 MIT Science Reporter television program tackles the challenges of getting the Apollo Command Module safely back from space through the atmosphere to Earth—one of the most forbidding hurdles of the Apollo program. William Brooks (Langley Research Center, Hampton VA) demonstrates techniques of testing the effects of high temperatures on substances proposed to shield the module on its re-entry at 25,000 mph. Edward Offenhartz (AVCO, Lowell MA) discusses the uses of ablation to dissipate the extreme heat and protect the module's occupants. Sandy Stubbs (Langley) explains the variety of module designs and their relative abilities to sustain different kinds of impact. The program is presented by MIT in association with WGBH-TV Boston, and hosted by MIT reporter John Fitch; it was produced for NASA. MIT Museum Collections




 

Joe King

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#70
This 1966 MIT Science Reporter television program details the development and construction of the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM), the only vehicle of the three Apollo spacecraft modules that actually lands on the moon. Project engineer Thomas Kelly gives a tour of the LEM at Grumman Aircraft in Long Island, NY, and demonstrates the LEM Automatic Checkout System, while test pilot Robert Smyth demonstrates the lunar landing simulator via an electronic computer-controlled model of the Moon. The program is presented by MIT in association with WGBH-TV Boston, and hosted by MIT reporter John Fitch; it was produced for NASA. MIT Museum Collections.




 

Unca Walt

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#72
I seriously doubt the car was stored inside the LEM...it was probably stowed on the outside and was (IIRC) folded up into a much smaller package.
Jeepers, guys...


If I wuz GOLDBRIX, I'd be discouraged.

Lookit the fargin picture on the first fargin post (by GOLDIE) on the top of this fargin page.
 

spinalcracker

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#73
Jeepers, guys...


If I wuz GOLDBRIX, I'd be discouraged.

Lookit the fargin picture on the first fargin post (by GOLDIE) on the top of this fargin page.
Fargin A+!.....

Fargin fargin fargin!.....

What is a plausible logical explanation on all the lost data?.....
 

GOLDBRIX

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#74
Jeepers, guys...If I wuz GOLDBRIX, I'd be discouraged.
Lookit the fargin picture on the first fargin post (by GOLDIE) on the top of this fargin page.
BIG THANK YOU Unca Walt.
 

Joe King

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#75
What is a plausible logical explanation on all the lost data?.
As it turns out, it seems that nothing was actually lost at all.

Wikipedia › wiki › Apollo_11_miss...
Apollo 11 missing tapes - Wikipedia

"The Apollo 11 missing tapes were those that were recorded from Apollo 11's slow-scan television (SSTV) telecast in its raw format on telemetry data tape at the time of the first Moon landing in 1969 and subsequently lost. ... At the time, the NTSC broadcast was recorded on many videotapes and kinescope films."

They have copies of all of it.
 

Joe King

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#76
How did NASA Steer the Saturn V?- Smarter Every Day 223


 

Joe King

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#77
This is the long version.

 

Cigarlover

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#78
we are going back and very soon. China is already there. Even has a photo from the moon of the round earth. Although that doesn't prove it's not flat :fighting::dduck:
 
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#79
Don't worry. Nasa will make sure a negro gets to be the first to step on Mars. With his white woman hoe he impregnates on the way. Whites running the misison will be kept behind the scenes so as not to ruin the 'feel good' triumph for diversity. Yo dawg! Iz bee tappin dat white azz on Mars muhfuggas!
 

Oldmansmith

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#80
W
we are going back and very soon. China is already there. Even has a photo from the moon of the round earth. Although that doesn't prove it's not flat :fighting::dduck:
We've been going "back to the moon" since the 70s.

I think that they could do it now, but what is stopping them is that it would then be glaringly obvious that the Apollo missions were fake.