• Same story, different day...........year ie more of the same fiat floods the world
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  • "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

~WORD of THE DAY~

Goldhedge

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Trump's a master at this...

Earned media
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Earned media (or free media) refers to publicity gained through promotional efforts other than paid media advertising, which refers to publicity gained through advertising,[1] or owned media, which refers to branding.
 

newmisty

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petulant
adjective

pet·u·lant | \ˈpe-chə-lənt \
Definition of petulant

1: insolent or rude in speech or behavior
2: characterized by temporary or capricious ill humor : PEEVISH
Other Words from petulantSynonymsPetulant Has Latin RootsExample SentencesLearn More about petulant

Other Words from petulant
petulantly adverb
Synonyms for petulant
Synonyms
choleric, crabby, cranky, cross, crotchety, fiery, grouchy, grumpy, irascible, irritable,peevish, perverse, pettish, prickly, quick-tempered, raspy, short-tempered,snappish, snappy, snippy, stuffy, testy, waspish
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Petulant Has Latin Roots
Petulant is one of many English words that are related to the Latin verb petere, which means "to go to," "to attack," "to seek," or "to request." "Petere" is a relative of the Latin adjective petulans ("impudent"), from which "petulant" was derived. Some other words with connections to "petere" are "compete" and "appetite." "Competere," the Late Latin precursor to "compete," is a combination of the prefix com- and the verb "petere." The joining of ad- and petere led to "appetere" ("to strive after"), and eventually to Latin appetitus, the source of our "appetite." Additional descendants of "petere" are "petition," "perpetual," and "impetus."
 

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phalanx

[fey-langks, fal-angks]

1. (Military) an ancient Greek and Macedonian battle formation of hoplites presenting long spears from behind a wall of overlapping shields
2. any closely ranked unit or mass of people: the police formed a phalanx to protect the embassy.
3. a number of people united for a common purpose
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a group of approximately 1800 persons forming a commune in which all property is collectively owned
5. (Anatomy) anatomy any of the bones of the fingers or toes.
6. (Botany) botany
a). a bundle of stamens, joined together by their stalks (filaments)
b). a form of vegetative spread in which the advance is on a broad front, as in the common reed.
 

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elide

/ēˈlīd/
verb

1. omit (a sound or syllable) when speaking.
"the indication of elided consonants or vowels"

2. join together; merge.
"whole periods of time are elided into a few seconds of screen time"

To elide something is to omit it or get rid of it. If your parents are especially strict, you might tell them about the A you got on your English essay and elide the fact that you failed your math quiz.

If your school is putting on a production of "Grease" and the director cuts a major scene from the play, you can say she elides it. And when an elected official gives a speech, he's almost sure to elide certain topics that are too controversial or negative. Elide is also used in grammar to describe the way people speak when they leave out certain sounds. It comes from the Latin elidere, "strike out or force out."
 

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cudgel
noun

cud·gel | \ˈkə-jəl \

: a short heavy club The eighteenth-century audience went to the theatre armed with whistles, rattles, … and sometimes even wooden cudgels.— Ronald Hayman


Tucker masterfully uses this word here:

 

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Patsy
Noun ˈpat-sē
American slang for a gullible and weak-minded person. A patsy is a fool, usually a person that has good intentions but is deceived easily.

Oswald.jpg
 
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arminius

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decline
 

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OK then...

Sesquipedalianism

The tendency to use long words. And, a sesquipedal is a person who has sesquipedalian tendencies.

BF
(don't ast me how to pernounce it)
 

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error
 
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arminius

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recline

recline 2.jpg
 

arminius

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^^^ a flavorite word...

One of those words that makes one stop and think.
 

arminius

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^ nope, just looked it up. Shaun of the Dead, hmmmm, I'll exacerbate it a little later...
 

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For some strange reason this makes me reflect on a combination of words that has tickled my fancy. Way back in the 70s I met a woman who was a member of a sky diving team in Oregon. They called themselves;

The Cunning Stunts.

:laughing:
 

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1546999953705.png
 

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For today's words, I would like those bots that answer to a .gov address to pass these up the line to your bosses:

honorable
Etymology
From Old French honorable, honurable, from Latin honōrābilis, from honōrō ‎(“I honour”‎); cognate with Italian onorabile, Spanish honorable. Synchronically analyzable as honor +‎ -able.

1. deserving of respect or high regard : deserving of honor
2. of great renown : illustrious
3. performed or accompanied with marks of honor or respect
4 a. attesting to creditable conduct
b. consistent with a reputation that is not tarnished or sullied
5. characterized by integrity : guided by a keen sense of duty and ethical conduct

honest
Etymology
From Old French honeste, from Latin honestus, from honor.

1. free of deceit and untruthfulness; sincere.
Characterized by integrity or fairness and straightforwardness in conduct, thought, speech, etc.; upright; just; equitable; trustworthy; truthful; sincere; free from fraud, guile, or duplicity; not false; - said of persons and acts, and of things to which a moral quality is imputed.
 

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allusion
An expression designed to call something to mind without mentioning it explicitly; an indirect or passing reference.

illusion
A thing that is or is likely to be wrongly perceived or interpreted by the senses.

Page 63.jpg

From my Heavy Metal collection.
Playing now, in the Comix section in the smoking room
(just you that have membership in GIM) <grin>
BF