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Goldhedge

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Trump's a master at this...

Earned media
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Earned media (or free media) refers to publicity gained through promotional efforts other than paid media advertising, which refers to publicity gained through advertising,[1] or owned media, which refers to branding.
 

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petulant
adjective

pet·u·lant | \ˈpe-chə-lənt \
Definition of petulant

1: insolent or rude in speech or behavior
2: characterized by temporary or capricious ill humor : PEEVISH
Other Words from petulantSynonymsPetulant Has Latin RootsExample SentencesLearn More about petulant

Other Words from petulant
petulantly adverb
Synonyms for petulant
Synonyms
choleric, crabby, cranky, cross, crotchety, fiery, grouchy, grumpy, irascible, irritable,peevish, perverse, pettish, prickly, quick-tempered, raspy, short-tempered,snappish, snappy, snippy, stuffy, testy, waspish
Visit the Thesaurus for More
Petulant Has Latin Roots
Petulant is one of many English words that are related to the Latin verb petere, which means "to go to," "to attack," "to seek," or "to request." "Petere" is a relative of the Latin adjective petulans ("impudent"), from which "petulant" was derived. Some other words with connections to "petere" are "compete" and "appetite." "Competere," the Late Latin precursor to "compete," is a combination of the prefix com- and the verb "petere." The joining of ad- and petere led to "appetere" ("to strive after"), and eventually to Latin appetitus, the source of our "appetite." Additional descendants of "petere" are "petition," "perpetual," and "impetus."
 

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phalanx

[fey-langks, fal-angks]

1. (Military) an ancient Greek and Macedonian battle formation of hoplites presenting long spears from behind a wall of overlapping shields
2. any closely ranked unit or mass of people: the police formed a phalanx to protect the embassy.
3. a number of people united for a common purpose
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a group of approximately 1800 persons forming a commune in which all property is collectively owned
5. (Anatomy) anatomy any of the bones of the fingers or toes.
6. (Botany) botany
a). a bundle of stamens, joined together by their stalks (filaments)
b). a form of vegetative spread in which the advance is on a broad front, as in the common reed.
 

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elide

/ēˈlīd/
verb

1. omit (a sound or syllable) when speaking.
"the indication of elided consonants or vowels"

2. join together; merge.
"whole periods of time are elided into a few seconds of screen time"

To elide something is to omit it or get rid of it. If your parents are especially strict, you might tell them about the A you got on your English essay and elide the fact that you failed your math quiz.

If your school is putting on a production of "Grease" and the director cuts a major scene from the play, you can say she elides it. And when an elected official gives a speech, he's almost sure to elide certain topics that are too controversial or negative. Elide is also used in grammar to describe the way people speak when they leave out certain sounds. It comes from the Latin elidere, "strike out or force out."
 

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cudgel
noun

cud·gel | \ˈkə-jəl \

: a short heavy club The eighteenth-century audience went to the theatre armed with whistles, rattles, … and sometimes even wooden cudgels.— Ronald Hayman


Tucker masterfully uses this word here:

 

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Patsy
Noun ˈpat-sē
American slang for a gullible and weak-minded person. A patsy is a fool, usually a person that has good intentions but is deceived easily.

Oswald.jpg
 
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arminius

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decline
 

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OK then...

Sesquipedalianism

The tendency to use long words. And, a sesquipedal is a person who has sesquipedalian tendencies.

BF
(don't ast me how to pernounce it)
 

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OK then...

Sesquipedalianism

The tendency to use long words. And, a sesquipedal is a person who has sesquipedalian tendencies.

BF
(don't ast me how to pernounce it)
Of course that word itself has to be unnecessarily long.
:belly laugh:
.
.
 

arminius

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error
 
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arminius

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recline

recline 2.jpg
 

arminius

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^^^ a flavorite word...

One of those words that makes one stop and think.
 

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^ nope, just looked it up. Shaun of the Dead, hmmmm, I'll exacerbate it a little later...
 

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For some strange reason this makes me reflect on a combination of words that has tickled my fancy. Way back in the 70s I met a woman who was a member of a sky diving team in Oregon. They called themselves;

The Cunning Stunts.

:laughing:
 

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1546999953705.png
 

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For today's words, I would like those bots that answer to a .gov address to pass these up the line to your bosses:

honorable
Etymology
From Old French honorable, honurable, from Latin honōrābilis, from honōrō ‎(“I honour”‎); cognate with Italian onorabile, Spanish honorable. Synchronically analyzable as honor +‎ -able.

1. deserving of respect or high regard : deserving of honor
2. of great renown : illustrious
3. performed or accompanied with marks of honor or respect
4 a. attesting to creditable conduct
b. consistent with a reputation that is not tarnished or sullied
5. characterized by integrity : guided by a keen sense of duty and ethical conduct

honest
Etymology
From Old French honeste, from Latin honestus, from honor.

1. free of deceit and untruthfulness; sincere.
Characterized by integrity or fairness and straightforwardness in conduct, thought, speech, etc.; upright; just; equitable; trustworthy; truthful; sincere; free from fraud, guile, or duplicity; not false; - said of persons and acts, and of things to which a moral quality is imputed.
 

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allusion
An expression designed to call something to mind without mentioning it explicitly; an indirect or passing reference.

illusion
A thing that is or is likely to be wrongly perceived or interpreted by the senses.

Page 63.jpg

From my Heavy Metal collection.
Playing now, in the Comix section in the smoking room
(just you that have membership in GIM) <grin>
BF
 

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Phenomenology

Phenomenology is the study of structures of consciousness as experienced from the first-person point of view. The central structure of an experience is its intentionality, its being directed toward something, as it is an experience of or about some object. An experience is directed toward an object by virtue of its content or meaning (which represents the object) together with appropriate enabling conditions.
 

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she·nan·i·gans
[SHəˈnanəɡənz]

NOUN
informal
shenanigan (noun)
  1. secret or dishonest activity or maneuvering.
    "widespread financial shenanigans had ruined the fortunes of many"
    synonyms:
    deceitfulness · deceit · deception · deviousness · two-facedness · double-dealing · underhandedness · dishonesty · falseness · falsity · fraud · fraudulence · sharp practice · swindling · cheating · chicanery · trickery · craft · guile · artifice · subterfuge · skulduggery · treachery · unfairness · unjustness · perfidy · improbity · crookedness · shadiness · foxiness · dirty tricks · shenanigans · monkey business · funny business · hanky-panky · jiggery-pokery · monkeyshines · codology · knavery · knavishness · management
    antonyms:
    honesty

ORIGIN
mid 19th century: of unknown origin.
 

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Paradigm

In science and philosophy, a paradigm is a distinct set of concepts or thought patterns, including theories, research methods, postulates, and standards for what constitutes legitimate contributions to a field.


(No, I didn't have to look it up to see what it meant, I knew. I just wanted the spooky guys to know we all knew it also)
BF
 

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Fidelity

Palazzo Ducale in Venice: capital # 28 in the porch, featuring Virtues and vices - In fidelitate nulli gero (Fidelity)

Fidelity is the quality of faithfulness or loyalty. Its original meaning regarded duty in a broader sense than the related concept of fealty. Both derive from the Latin word fidēlis, meaning "faithful or loyal". In the City of London financial markets it has traditionally been used in the sense encompassed in the motto "My word is my bond".
 

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jux·ta·pose
[ˈjəkstəˌpōz]

VERB
juxtaposed (past tense) · juxtaposed (past participle)
  1. place or deal with close together for contrasting effect.
    "black-and-white photos of slums were starkly juxtaposed with color images"
    synonyms:
    place/set side by side · place/set close to one another · mix · compare · contrast · place/set against one another · collocate · colligate
 

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I always remebered this one from high school.
Although I remember it meaning
Vulgarly and artificially attractive.

Meretricious
adjective mer·e·tri·cious | \ ˌmer-ə-ˈtri-shəs \ Definition of meretricious
1: of or relating to a prostitute : having the nature of prostitution meretricious relationships
2a: tawdrily and falsely attractive
the paradise they found was a piece of meretricious trash
 

engineear

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One of the few German words I recall from 7th grade german...
Munchmall...english translation...sometimes. but it sounds like a verb referring to eating/shopping, at the same time,.
Not sure on spelling, perhaps 1 L.
 

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raddled
adjective RAD-uld
Definition
1 : being in a state of confusion : lacking composure
2 : broken-down, worn

Did You Know?
The origin of raddled is unclear. Its participial form suggests verbal parentage, and indeed there is a verb raddle just a few decades older than raddled that seems a likely source. This raddle means "to mark or paint with raddle," raddle here being red ocher, or sometimes other pigments, used for marking animals. Raddle eventually came to mean "to color highly with rouge," the metaphor connecting the raddling of animal husbandry with immoderate makeup application: to be raddled thusly was not a compliment. The "confused" sense of raddled is often associated with the influence of alcohol or drugs. That connection is in keeping with the word's earliest known use, from a 1694 translation of French writer Francois Rabelais: "A … fellow, continually raddled, and as drunk as a wheelbarrow."





 

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discombobulate
verb
dis·com·bob·u·late | \ ˌdis-kəm-ˈbä-b(y)ə-ˌlāt \
discombobulated; discombobulating
Definition of discombobulate
transitive verb
: UPSET, CONFUSE
was discombobulated by her revelation
inventing cool new ways to discombobulate the old order
— Kurt Andersen
 

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discombobulate
verb
dis·com·bob·u·late | \ ˌdis-kəm-ˈbä-b(y)ə-ˌlāt \
discombobulated; discombobulating
Definition of discombobulate
transitive verb
: UPSET, CONFUSE
was discombobulated by her revelation
inventing cool new ways to discombobulate the old order
— Kurt Andersen
One of my favorites!
 

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oubliette

The Oubliette was a type of a medieval dungeon which was usually underground and was designed to isolate the prisoner completely from the outside world. It was usually a narrow vertical tunnel-like dungeon which had an opening only in the ceiling. Oubliettes from the medieval times have been found throughout Europe.
From the same fellows that brought us The French Revolution and the guillotine. The Oubliette was originally found in medieval French castles and this is why the word is French, from oublier ‎(“to forget”‎).

Let's make these popular once more, hanging is over too quick.
 

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Need means wanting someone else’s money. Greed means wanting to keep your own. Compassion is when a politician arranges the transfer.

juxtaposition
Juxtaposition is an act or instance of placing two elements close together or side by side. This is often done in order to compare/contrast the two, to show similarities or differences, etc. Juxtaposition in literary terms is the showing contrast by concepts placed side by side.