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stonedywankanobe

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#1
Why not?

Starting a little room addition today 14 x 30.
Can't do much we have some rain inbound this weekend.
Upon removal of the facia and soffit noticed that the brick layer forgot something on the corner down there.
20160915_103731.jpg


Hopefully about a 3 day project when the rain ends but we need it been pretty dry lately.

don't work too hard sirs.
 

pitw

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#2
Gotta hate needing rain and getting rain when you don't need it. Looks like a fun project you got going on.
 

Usury

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#3
Why not?

Starting a little room addition today 14 x 30.
Can't do much we have some rain inbound this weekend.
Upon removal of the facia and soffit noticed that the brick layer forgot something on the corner down there.
View attachment 84850

Hopefully about a 3 day project when the rain ends but we need it been pretty dry lately.

don't work too hard sirs.
So I give up...what's wrong with the corner? Hard to see much of it in the pic....
 

Usury

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#4
View attachment 84853 I love that we can take pictures these days quickly so we can show customers what we are running accross while working on their homes. Facia soffit rot on house i am painting.
If I were the owner, I'd sure ask for a clearer pic than that. Hard to see much other than the paint flaking off in that pic.
 

Goldhedge

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#8
I just replaced deck steps for a friend. He just wanted me to replace one board.

Still have the fascia boards to install, but you get the idea.

9ft wide steps w redwood and cedar fascia - wood cost $200!

IMG_0247.JPG
IMG_0250.JPG
IMG_0253.JPG




EDIT to add pic


51406521406__AA6F7BD8-526D-4157-BFBA-59E1E5578E61.JPG.jpeg
 
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stonedywankanobe

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#9
Quite correct Herchal. The whole other side of the house is missing a run of brick.
Trying to get another pic of a blunder to post so far no dice.
 

stonedywankanobe

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#10
20160915_142012.jpg


Looks like the original carpenter decided brick mold on a back door was just as overrated as conduit.
Folks this is a big mistake that has most likely allowed lots of moisture into the wall, mold is likely growing in there.
Note the gap between the brick and door jamb.
Not only should it have a wooden brick mold but that should have wrapped in metal and the brick butts to it taking the point where the brick meets the door a good 2.25 inches away from the jamb horizontally.
Busch league.
Shouldn't see 1 inch cut brick going into a doorway like that. If you do call Andial.
 

stonedywankanobe

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#11
Sir Hedge that little gnome in the flower pot there is staring at your steps like hes wondering if your gonna put some risers on those things.

Either way nice job Mr.
 
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smooth

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#14
barn door frames.jpg


Barn door frames. No nails or screws, pegged tenon and mortise joints. They will get covered with green 3/4" cedar. The angle brace was dado'ed like a half lap joint then pegged as well.
 

smooth

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stonedywankanobe

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#18
20160916_110855.jpg


20160916_111000.jpg


20160916_110917.jpg


Well I thought I had the day off but ended up back on this place we framed and trimmed 4 years ago. About a month after trimming pops and I went back and fixed this room up with knotty alder from head to toe.
Spent 2 weeks in there working are butts off.

This is less a post about the work we did and moar of a cautionary tell of what can go wrong in a tounge and groove cathedral celing.

Long story short mold. Without a proper vapor barrier water in its gaseous state will rise regardless of air temperature.
When it finds its way through the knot holes and little cracks and makes it into the insulation above it will encounter the proper temperature difference and hit the dew point where it will condense back to a liquid state and create perfect conditions for mold growth.

Precautions to keep this from happening include sheetrocking the ceiling before running a wood product up there. Several manufacturers sell vapor barrier in a roll form also. Tyvek is a no go here as it allows gaseous state h2o to permeate.

In this case here the insulation crew had already applied the cloth mesh to underside of the rafter and had blown in cellulose on top. At the time no one had a clue as to what could and would happen.

Now four years later enough moisture had accumulated in the first few inches of cellulose
that the alder had swelled enough to pop loose four ceiling board which were blind nailed using 2.5 inch 16 ga finish nails applied with a gun by yours truly.

Home owner originally wanted to completely tear it all down and start over. However upon calling the insulation company and having it sucked out we discovered the mold wasn't as wide spread as we had thought.

Upon hearing about and seeing his problem he put it on me to find a solution. So considering that I really wasn't interested in tearing the ceiling down I done a bit of research.

My solution was pretty simple.
Remove the mesh containing the mold for access to the wood below. Done that today.
Take a 50 50 bleach water solution and mist the ceiling boards from the top side to kill the active mold.
Then instead of celuose he will go back with spray foam insulation which is vapor impermeable to stop the condensation from ever happening while at the same time giving him far better r value.
Two birds one stone.

Also put him a continuous ridge vent over this section of the house. His call.

This guy is a great dude and sure hate to see him have to deal with all this.
Will update if all doesn't go as planned.
 
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stonedywankanobe

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Lt Dan

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Bought a new portable table saw last night. When I checked out, the rather rotund lady that checked me out, (least I thing she was a lady), said I'd love my new saw, and that she loved her portable table saw, however she did not show me pictures, and I did not ask to see any. I have my other saw set up to use dado blades, so this one will just be for mostly straight ripping shorter boards and such.

Because I have my own bandsaw sawmill, I have plenty of lumber to work with. I've had a few guys ask me if I did custom sawing, but I just usually tell them I'm retired, it's just a retirement hobby. My son does quite a lot of woodwork in his shop, and grabs onto most of the oak and a lot of the walnut I get. I'm working with some cherry, (wood), right now, gotta let it season out some more, but making beehives and other small projects. I did plane out and glue up a piece of scrap walnut, wife grabbed that for a cutting board.
 

smooth

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#28
I'm on the fence with the whole breast brushing incident. Slightly skeptical
 

smooth

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#29
Bought a new portable table saw last night. When I checked out, the rather rotund lady that checked me out, (least I thing she was a lady), said I'd love my new saw, and that she loved her portable table saw, however she did not show me pictures, and I did not ask to see any. I have my other saw set up to use dado blades, so this one will just be for mostly straight ripping shorter boards and such.

Because I have my own bandsaw sawmill, I have plenty of lumber to work with. I've had a few guys ask me if I did custom sawing, but I just usually tell them I'm retired, it's just a retirement hobby. My son does quite a lot of woodwork in his shop, and grabs onto most of the oak and a lot of the walnut I get. I'm working with some cherry, (wood), right now, gotta let it season out some more, but making beehives and other small projects. I did plane out and glue up a piece of scrap walnut, wife grabbed that for a cutting board.
I always thought it would be nice to have a second table saw set up with just a dado blade.If I remember right I think I have 4 routers. A couple of nice machines and a couple of cheapies. It's nice to have one designated with a flushing bit and another with an 1/8 round over. Or what ever you use the most. When I was doing more furniture type stuff I kept one with a dovetail bit and guide bushing that was set just right for the jig using 5/8's drawer material.
 
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Lt Dan

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#30
I always thought it would be nice to have a second table saw set up with just a dado blade.If I remember right I think I have 4 routers. A couple of nice machines and a couple of cheapies. It's nice to have one designated with a flushing bit and another with an 1/8 round over. Or what ever you use the most. When I was doing more furniture type stuff I kept one with a dovetail bit and guide bushing that was set just right for the jig using 5/8's drawer material.
Yes, it's the set up that is the pain in the ass. Changing blades on a table saw, then needing the other blade for a couple cuts or a dozen then back to the other blades can consume a lot of time. Being retired it still seemed reasonable to get the portable, just in case. Same with the router, except I only own one of those and have it set up on a router table for about the only thing I presently use it for. Occasionally I do have to adjust the height is all.

As for the boobs thing, I'd admit that it can happen, has happened a few times, very strange and yes other things, but no known pictures were taken and no proof, so I will abstain from telling of such things. Andial can be such a tease.
 

Hystckndle

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#31
Ya say ??
Looks like a man cave. :)
An UMC ( ultimate man cave ) .
Lighting , even effects, a pole for ????
Security, roll down doors probably
Projection machine. Changing rooms....
No fun and games indeed.
:)
Seriously though....nice work this thread.
Back to work myself.
 

Lt Dan

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#32
Cedar pricing has gone full on crazy
When I first got into bees, I considered using cedar instead of pine which is what commercial hives are made of. Pine is available and not very expensive compared to cedar but pine does not hold up under the weather as good. I also considered locust - actually made one super out of it, but not again, it's to heavy and not easy to work with. Making hive supers with pine only costs slightly less than I can buy them all cut out and ready to put together and paint. I have seen cypress hives at a fairly high price, but would have to special order that lumber. One other thing I've noticed about cedar here is that is is hard to find good clear boards that are free of dry knots. That would not work well for bee boxes.

That brings me to why I decided on using cherry. I have some growing on the place large enough to saw into lumber. If not on my place it grows in the area. It is reasonable easy to work with, is not the best firewood, so when I do order firewood logs and some is cherry, I don't mind pulling it aside for saw logs. Cherry, if up off the ground and painted withstands weather much better than pine and the bees do not care. So, I do buy cedar to make bottom boards, as it will handle the moisture sitting on the cement blocks, it might also resists some pests like moths that might get into the hives. For the hive brood boxes and supers, I'll be using cherry for all that I make myself.
 

Alton

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#33
Cedar, white oak, ipe (ee-pay) and cypress are all known to resist moisture. Cedar, cypress and white oak are relatively easy to work. Ipe is DENSE and hard as well as resistant to moisture and bugs. This makes it very durable.

Mahogany from Africa and South America are both quite moisture and bug resistant. Philippine mahogany is not a real mahogany but a type of Asian wood known as shorea. It does, however, have some of the look and many of the properties of Af/SA mahoganies.

Basswood used to be popular for hives because it's fairly durable, stable and quite light in weight. It has become a popular wood for carving because it's easy to carve and it's stability is great for holding fine detail. I'm uncertain as to how it handles contact with moisture but remains stable in humid environments. I'm sure a coat of paint on the bottom would keep it dry.
 

Lt Dan

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#34
Thanks Alton for all the info on wood. I'm in south central Ohio and we do have quite a good selection of locally grown trees. However, it takes a life time to grow most of them, something I do not have left being soon to be 70 years of age. That ipe wood would still probably be sound 20+ years from now, however, sounds kind of heavy for a hive super and possibly a bit hard to cut finger joints and hand holds in. That is the problem I ran into with the locust wood, very dense, hard to work but does last many years in weather such as we have here.

I have some very young white oak growing that I planted and never expect to harvest in my lifetime. Even my son will probably not live to see those trees mature. The black walnut we planted maybe he will see mature. We have a few of those that will be mature for me if I life another 20 years, and a few that could be cut now. However, I've only a few acres of wood land on my place, most is farm land that I cash rent to a local farmer. Besides the cherry, I have mostly hackberry, related to elm, which as you may know, does not withstand exposer to weather all that well. Not sure if it would even out last pine. Pine I have to buy at a lumber yard unless I could find someone to sell or trade me some sawmill work for a few logs. Hard to find much cedar either, it grows plentiful here, but hard to find it grown large enough for saw logs. So, for that, I have to go to a lumber yard. Then for medium hive supers, I need at least 1x8 boards, kinda pricey when you figure I'm not keeping bees to sell honey, just want enough for family use and to pollinate fruit and garden flowers.

Basswood is alright for some things, but a lot like pine when it comes to weather. I have none of that on my land and only occasionally will the logger that brings my firewood logs slip me a few of those in the load. What I usually get with those loads of logs is the same as they haul in to the paper mill, stuff they can't sell to regular sawmills, so I'm not getting high quality logs and many are smaller, crookeder, and knottier than would be very useful as lumber. I saw it out anyway and just burn up the scraps in the outdoor wood boiler. So, I don't mind the scrap pile, it heats the home in the winter. Actually, it heats two homes in the winter.
 

stonedywankanobe

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#35
Nice info fellas. Lt we went through a spell for several years here where the honey bee was somewhat of a rare sight.
Hearing you talk of bee boxes makes me want one myself. So is it just a process of building the box and the bee's will come or how does getting it going work sir?
 

Alton

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#36
Sounds like pretty much the same selection of trees we have locally, which is pretty much the same as in Van Wert, Sydney even down to Dayton. Your cherry should be quite similar to ours which, when coated (paint, polyurethane) should stand up well to the weather. What dimensions are you looking at for your super?
 

Lt Dan

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#37
........... What dimensions are you looking at for your super?
I plan on using almost all 8 frame medium supers - approximate measurements 14" x 20" by 6 & 5/8" deep. If I saw the lumber I would go with 5/4 by 7" wide in whatever length I can get. About 4' long is the shortest I can easily handle in my mill, but longer is better. Then trim and plane down to 3/4" by the above width I need. I could saw the boards to 1" and just plan one side, that would also work. Trying to saw to 3/4 and not planing would probably not work so well, as a bandsaw mill tends to drift sometimes and you end up with thick and thin lumber. Also, if the the logs are not seasoned out there will be shrinkage - so better to cut it thicker and wider than the needed finished dimension.
 

Lt Dan

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#38
Nice info fellas. Lt we went through a spell for several years here where the honey bee was somewhat of a rare sight.
Hearing you talk of bee boxes makes me want one myself. So is it just a process of building the box and the bee's will come or how does getting it going work sir?
Well, that might work, but not so common. If you want to research it there is much information out there in the form of web pages of pdf books, youtube videos, more than you'd ever have time to read or watch.

The easy way for a beginner is to buy a hive of bees off someone who sells what is called a nuc. A nuc, short for nucleus, is a full working hive, or colony of bees, that can be moved to your location and then just let the bees grow the colony by adding supers.

Next would be to get the hive and equipment and then buy a package of bees including a queen to install in the hive.

Then, there is finding and capturing a swarm, for a beginner, that might be the most difficult, but there are good instructions in both youtube and pdf/htm files online to guide a person through that.

I went the easy way and bought the nuc. I'm still trying to capture a swarm, but the swarming season is about over as the bees are heading into the fall mode now here in Ohio.

We took off about 5 quarts of honey this summer, and I plan to pull the top super late Sept. or early Oct, or I may just leave it over winter for the bees, but most guys would take it and sell it. I do not plan to sell any, so if we don't need it, we might let the bees keep it.
 

ttazzman

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#40
Stoney.......been thinking of trying a hive or two myself.....be aware that some animals eat the Bee's themselves such as Skunks....they will go rattle the hive and eat the bees as they emerge...