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workin man

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And on the flat. I always screw on the high - that way when the gasket deteriorates, it doesn't leak. Although, I've read the manufacturers specs for different sheet metal and they say to screw on the flat. None of the old corrugated was nailed on the low part of the corrugation.
Yeah, the old galvanized corrugated was nailed on the highs with lead washer ring shank nails. Early metal screw panels were also screw on the highs, but there wasn't enough tension on the gasket for it to work, now all screw metal roofs are screw on the flat until you see the gasket spread. Works great for 20 years until the rubber goes bad. then you either replace the screws with wide flange screws which overcomes any rot in the wood. If there is too much rot for wide flange screws to hold, you slide the whole sheet an inch uphill and screw into fresh meat.
A screw metal roof is still the best value in a roof, IMO. It's the only kind of roof I ever do.
 

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Yeah, the old galvanized corrugated was nailed on the highs with lead washer ring shank nails. Early metal screw panels were also screw on the highs, but there wasn't enough tension on the gasket for it to work, now all screw metal roofs are screw on the flat until you see the gasket spread. Works great for 20 years until the rubber goes bad. then you either replace the screws with wide flange screws which overcomes any rot in the wood. If there is too much rot for wide flange screws to hold, you slide the whole sheet an inch uphill and screw into fresh meat.
A screw metal roof is still the best value in a roof, IMO. It's the only kind of roof I ever do.
I still do corrugated with screws on the high - I get 22g corrugated from Berridge in San Antonio and you can get good tension and gasket compression with the heavier metal. The stuff from big box stores is total crap, I wouldn't build a chicken coop with it. My metal roofs have been standing seam 24g ( preferred), corrugated 22g, and recently, a torch down system from ABC called Mulehide - Ice and water membrane, 2" polyiso board insulation, fiberglass base sheet, and then the torch down layer. PITA, but this was on a problem low pitch roof that had never not leaked. Not a drop now, and it's supposed to be good for 30 years.
 

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I still do corrugated with screws on the high - I get 22g corrugated from Berridge in San Antonio and you can get good tension and gasket compression with the heavier metal. The stuff from big box stores is total crap, I wouldn't build a chicken coop with it. My metal roofs have been standing seam 24g ( preferred), corrugated 22g, and recently, a torch down system from ABC called Mulehide - Ice and water membrane, 2" polyiso board insulation, fiberglass base sheet, and then the torch down layer. PITA, but this was on a problem low pitch roof that had never not leaked. Not a drop now, and it's supposed to be good for 30 years.
Most of the metal roofs around here are 28-29 gauge painted. If it's on slats instead of plywood, then high rib 27 gauge for snow load between slats. This is not big hail country. 4 in 12 in minimum pitch. Standing seam is mostly commercial, not many rich folks here.
 

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StOnEy, I'm waiting a little while longer before fully plunging cordless as I'm not ready monetarily yet but I did recently pick up a new 20v Dewilt cordless drill/driver combo and then splurged on a Dewilt cordless sawzall. Used it to cut in a vent hole through some hardi siding and it was tits. Cords are so last century! On that note I'm currently using a crapsman circ saw that a hired grunt cut into the cord of. I do'nt have an extra in that guage so have been using it partially wrapped around the body to keep the pixies flowing but methinks it's about time to upgrade to a cordless model.

Also broke down and bought a mini shop vac that works well while being less of a PITA to carry and store. $30 at Home Cheapo.

vac1.jpg
 

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I hear you Mister and I really couldn't have afforded to pay full price for the stuff I have in that pic. Every piece of it was caught on sale. Still have another one of the fuel sawsalls and 9amphour battery combos setting in my closet never opened. Got those for 125 each and bought 3. Those batteries cost that much alone!

IMG_1131.JPG



Here's a shot of the 10gallon keg i mentioned, with my dugout for scale.


IMG_1085.JPG


Sucker is heavy man. Came with the nicer 6 ball fittings installed, has a drain on bottom and relief on top there.

Probably going to rig a shutoff valve on the inlet side so as to save the air and have a reserve travel tank.

Got that at Ridout in Conway for 152 out the door. Amazon,no shit, was wanting 170 or so with none of the fittings included, go figure.
 

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Man I wish I could justify buyin shit anymore. Some nice looking tools out there that I'll never be able to use <sniff>. I'm still using a table saw made in 1958 — replaced the engine a while back already. But most all my hand machines are battery.

And lookit this; gettin hurt ain't the same when yer an old guy —

Whack.jpg

simple little cut, eh? I was moving a box of tile, weighed maybe 35 - 40 pounds, thru a doorway and I 'bumped' the casement. Damn! Right on top of that little bone that runs across the back of yer hand right there. That was friday. Still aches...
 

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Finally made it. I have been stuck at the Mall of America for the past 1.5 months. About the shittiest place I have ever worked. You forget something in the van and its a 1/2 hour walk to the van just to get up there and realize you forgot something else. Found out that just don't ask for permission. They will dick you around for weeks before you get an answer.

To get on the roof you need a security guard with you at all times. Your company also has to pay the mall 45-90 an hour for them to sit and watch you work. Need 72 hours notice in advance. So I get talking with these security guards. The place is like a freaking battle zone. They have all sorts of problems with "teens" and "religious extremists". Pretty interesting to see that side.

Anyway told the shop I'm done at the mall. Next job at the mall is someone else's turn. It was 1.5 months of a complete and utter shit show.
 

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Finally made it. I have been stuck at the Mall of America for the past 1.5 months. About the shittiest place I have ever worked. You forget something in the van and its a 1/2 hour walk to the van just to get up there and realize you forgot something else. Found out that just don't ask for permission. They will dick you around for weeks before you get an answer.

To get on the roof you need a security guard with you at all times. Your company also has to pay the mall 45-90 an hour for them to sit and watch you work. Need 72 hours notice in advance. So I get talking with these security guards. The place is like a freaking battle zone. They have all sorts of problems with "teens" and "religious extremists". Pretty interesting to see that side.

Anyway told the shop I'm done at the mall. Next job at the mall is someone else's turn. It was 1.5 months of a complete and utter shit show.
Wonder if the security guard would protect you.
 

hammerhead

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Man I wish I could justify buyin shit anymore. Some nice looking tools out there that I'll never be able to use <sniff>. I'm still using a table saw made in 1958 — replaced the engine a while back already. But most all my hand machines are battery.

And lookit this; gettin hurt ain't the same when yer an old guy —


simple little cut, eh? I was moving a box of tile, weighed maybe 35 - 40 pounds, thru a doorway and I 'bumped' the casement. Damn! Right on top of that little bone that runs across the back of yer hand right there. That was friday. Still aches...
Knarly knuckle there, Bf.
 

hoarder

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Nope. Their only job is to tell you when you are 20ft from the edge and then you need to harness off.
Security means secure the company against lawsuits.
 

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Man I wish I could justify buyin shit anymore. Some nice looking tools out there that I'll never be able to use <sniff>. I'm still using a table saw made in 1958 — replaced the engine a while back already. But most all my hand machines are battery.

And lookit this; gettin hurt ain't the same when yer an old guy —


simple little cut, eh? I was moving a box of tile, weighed maybe 35 - 40 pounds, thru a doorway and I 'bumped' the casement. Damn! Right on top of that little bone that runs across the back of yer hand right there. That was friday. Still aches...
Lick it and forget it :) If I don't draw a little blood, I'm not workin'.

The ole' skin thinning out doesn't help...
 

Bottom Feeder

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If I don't draw a little blood, I'm not workin'.
Yeah, me too. But now each blood letting immediately announces itself, whereas it used to be at the end of the day I would say "When the hell did that happen?" Gettin old is a bitch, but they didn't tell me it was gonna affect my tinkerin.

brick

(effect or affect? I can never figure that out.)
 

newmisty

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I've had that old hand not fitting through the door jamb happen more than thrice. Leaves a nice little knot.

The Durometer Measurement of the Skin: Hardware and Measuring Principles
  • Abstract
The mechanical properties of the human skin are complex; although the skin is readily accessible, it is always a difficult task to identify simple and noninvasive measurement methods suitable for a specific skin parameter. This chapter describes a novel and simple instrument called a durometer, which is now used to assess and quantify the degree of skin hardness. The durometer is an engineering instrument widely employed in industry to measure the hardness of metals, plastic, rubber, and other nonmetallic materials. The instrument has been applied in the last few years in several medical conditions where skin hardness is a clinical feature of the disease and where there is a need for quantification of hardness for prognostic and therapeutic reasons.

Keywords
Durometer Skin hardness Morphea Lipodermatosclerosis Venous disease Neurophatic foot Shore units (SU) scale

https://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007/978-3-319-26594-0_131-1
 

newmisty

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Lumber Prices Dive in October

Dealers are talking price "collapse," as framing lumber prices have dropped like a rock from their mid-summer peaks.
By Ted Cushman
Lumber market observers are talking about prices this month, and for good reason: After peaking at record highs in mid-summer, framing lumber prices have taken a plunging dive, taking suppliers and dealers by surprise.

Lumber prices have plunged since mid-summer, as ample mill capacity meets land and labor constraints on housing construction. (Source: NAHB)
Lumber prices have plunged since mid-summer, as ample mill capacity meets land and labor constraints on housing construction. (Source: NAHB)
The well-known Random Lengths composite framing lumber index, an industry benchmark that aggregates the prices of popular grades and dimensions of wood, hit an all-time high of $582 per 1,000 board feet in June. By mid-October, the index had fallen to just $373.

1540758737505.png

Lumber prices have plunged since mid-summer, as ample mill capacity meets land and labor constraints on housing construction. (Source: NAHB

Hurricanes often cause lumber price spikes, but Hurricane Michael's devastating strike on the Florida Panhandle barely registered as a blip on lumber markets. "Hurricane Michael’s legacy in the softwood lumber and panel industries may be its lack of impact on markets," commented Random Lengths. Big-picture housing market forces could be the reason, Random Lengths noted: "Traders looking for answers to the third-quarter meltdown in wood products prices can now credibly add a slowdown in U.S. housing starts to the list of factors."


https://www.jlconline.com/business/...)&he=9809ca976bc7010b6ea639470b7d639ab4d992f9
 

newmisty

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Hurricane Michael's Destruction, Up Close
Google Street View has updated its imagery of hard-hit Mexico Beach, showing the storm's destruction along the town's main drag.
By Ted Cushman
In twos and threes, property owners have begun to return to the devastated community of Mexico Beach on the Florida Panhandle. Most of the town's seaside buildings were heavily damaged or destroyed, and residents are grappling with the question of whether, and how, to rebuild. The Los Angeles Times had this report (see: "Hurricane Michael leaves a seaside Florida town in an existential crisis," by Jenny Jarvie). "Many residents and business owners, anticipating massive insurance shortfalls, have yet to decide whether to commit to the daunting challenge of rebuilding structures strong enough to withstand the next big storm," the paper reported. "About a third of the town’s 1,200 full-time residents are senior citizens. Many homes were not covered by flood insurance. A vast swath of older ranch-style homes and commercial structures sat at ground level and did not meet the state’s current elevation and windstorm requirements."

A Google camera car drove down Highway 98 in Mexico Beach, providing an up-close tour of Hurricane Michael's aftermath.


Viewed from the town's seaside main drag, the damage is daunting. Google Maps has updated its "Street View" imagery, allowing an up-close view of the beach town's post-storm condition, reported Fox 4 WFTX (Fort Myers/Cape Coral) (see: "Street view shows hurricane destruction in Mexico Beach, Florida"). "The new images uploaded to Google Street View were taken from a vehicle driving along Highway 98 through the town shortly after the storm, and show piles of debris everywhere and crews working on cleanup details," the station reported.

At least one iconic town business is vowing to rebuild, reported TV station WJHG/WECP, NBC Channel 7 (see: "Popular Mexico Beach restaurant planning to rebuild"). Patrick Lee, owner of Toucan's Restaurant, said, "We're not running from this, Michael didn't scare us away. Toucan's is going to be part of Mexico Beach. It's been here since 1966 so we're going to be here for another 50 years."

But Lee will be starting from scratch. The Google Street View image from the restaurant's address shows a jumbled pile of debris in the middle of a devastated streetscape.

https://www.jlconline.com/coastal-c...)&he=9809ca976bc7010b6ea639470b7d639ab4d992f9
 

newmisty

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Don't Forget to Breathe
Ventilation and IAQ in an era of increasing air-sealing requirements
By Clayton DeKorne

As buildings get tighter, do we risk higher concentrations of indoor air pollutants? That's certainly been the conventional wisdom for a long time. And it's apparently still true for things like radon and VOCs and formaldehyde. Only it turns out these are not always the most prevalent indoor pollutants. Pollutants from outdoors may be the biggest IAQ problem we face.

In recent pair of blog posts, Allison Bailes has taken on the topic of indoor air pollution in an important way. If you only have time to read one of these posts, read" Which Pollutants Matter Most? in which he picks up on research by Brett Singer of the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab presented at Summer Camp last August. Singer showed that while most people think about formaldehyde and other VOCs when the term IAQ is brought up, the most common pollutants are incredibly small particulates dubbed PM2.5. These particles are so small that they often are breathed deep into our lungs and often go straight into the bloodstream.


Size comparisons for particulate matter, or PM: Particle pollution includes:
  • PM10 : inhalable particles, with diameters that are generally 10 micrometers and smaller; and
  • PM2.5 : fine inhalable particles, with diameters that are generally 2.5 micrometers and smaller.
How small is 2.5 micrometers? Think about a single hair from your head. The average human hair is about 70 micrometers in diameter – making it 30 times larger than the largest fine particle. (image: EPA)

Smoking indoors, burning candles and cooking produces a lot, but most PM2.5 comes from outdoor sources. The exhaust from cars and trucks is one of the most prevalent sources in most areas.

Allison lists the indoor pollutants we should pay attention to, and gives us a succinct description of what we can do about each one to improve indoor air quality. Source control is often the most effective solution, but for the most prevalent pollutants in the PM2.5 range, Allison points to point-source ventilation (kitchen hoods and bath fans to remove particulates) and filtration as effective control strategies.

That brings us to the second of Allison's blogs, 7 Reasons Your Filter Isn't Improving Your Indoor Air Quality. Anyone who has anything to do with installing mechanical ventilation and forced air heating systems should be aware of the issues raised in this blog. It's not just a matter of changing the filter, or choosing a high MERV filter, although that helps. (You need at least a MERV 10 filter to begin getting at least half of the PM2.5 but and MERV 13 to filter out a significant portion ot he tiny stuff.) Take note, here, that a high-MERV filter may reduce airflow if your system was not designed for it. Allison intends to dive deep into this in the next few blogs.

While filtration is one way to limit exposure of PM2.5, source control still plays a strong role. Given that most PM2.5 comes from outdoors, air sealing is the control strategy for limiting the source. Brett Singer, in his presentation at Build ing Science Summer Camp, demonstrated how the "penetration factor" - the fraction of outdoor particles coming into a home with infiltrating air - gets lower the tighter a house becomes.

Ventilation, airtightness and IAQ are not for the faint of heart. It's a complex topic that has only been touched on briefly here. JLC has organized a workshop n Austin next month at the Hive for Housing conference to where we will continue to explore this complex nexus of physics, chemistry, biology and building systems. Ted Cushman and I will be moderating a discussion with Brett Singer, Kristof Irwin of Positive Energy and Geoff Farrell of Mandalay Homes. Ventilation and IAQ still has a long ways to go before it is as clear to the majority of builders as air sealing the shell is today (and let's face it, a lot of builders are still playing catch up with air sealing).

https://www.jlconline.com/how-to/dont-forget-to-breath_o?utm_source=newsletter&utm_content=Brief&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=JLC_102818 (1)&he=9809ca976bc7010b6ea639470b7d639ab4d992f9
 

spinalcracker

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My gf had a new roof put on...
She got hit with baseball hail too....

50 squares..
All material was preloaded onto roof..

Old shingles were removed , rereoofed and they are cleaning up this evening....

They started about 7am Saturday morning...
Here it is Sunday 7pm and they are 99% done....

Is that pretty fast for 4 Mexicans aged 22 to 43?....
 

newmisty

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My gf had a new roof put on...
She got hit with baseball hail too....

50 squares..
All material was preloaded onto roof..

Old shingles were removed , rereoofed and they are cleaning up this evening....

They started about 7am Saturday morning...
Here it is Sunday 7pm and they are 99% done....

Is that pretty fast for 4 Mexicans aged 22 to 43?....
I'd love to see the depth setting on those nails.
 

Rusty Shackelford

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Been sleeping on the same queen sized mattress for over 15 years. Wife wants a new one (well me too). But we both agreed to go King size. Getting a hybrid spring/memory foam mattress. 15" thick and does not use a box spring. But because of its size and weight, it requires a platform instead of normal old school bed frame. Made the platform out of stand 2x8 material with 5/8" plywood....nothing special...but I did make a custom headboard that I though turned out nice.
headboard.jpg
 

newmisty

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Nice job Rusty.
 

newmisty

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newmisty

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5 nails per shingle...they look like 2" nails?...
I was referencing the depth setting. The majority of roofing banshees "ratta tatta tat" their air nailer so fast, there's no way that the nails are flat and at the right depth as required.
 

stonedywankanobe

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Dern nice lookin head board there Sir Shackles. My old lady is constantly showing me pictures of this and that saying it would be so easy for you to make it bae.
However,
I'm an expert at coming up with excuses as to why now isn't a good time. Can you believe she had the nerve about a week back to bring up the coffee table I've been restoring for 5 years? I thought she had forgot about that fecking thing long ago!

Anyway, Enough about the nag.

Pops and me are working super steady still. Finished the house in Volonia last week and we're framing a 900 foot mancave, for the same folk, in between the rain showers this week.

Got the hip roof raftered out and put the 2x6 band around it today. Like decking her in and some osb on the walls, should be walking away from it tomorrow.

I put in 14 hours last Saturday in Northern AR, setting trusses on a hunting lodge for a fellow. Place is right on the Little Black river and built on 11' stilts as the game and fish dams the river and floods the woods for duck hunting every year I'm told.

Love the name of the joint.
IMG_1143.JPG


About and hour before we finished up here. 29 feet off the mud, using a feckin coal miner head light!
IMG_1150.JPG


Serious business.
 

newmisty

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Dern nice lookin head board there Sir Shackles. My old lady is constantly showing me pictures of this and that saying it would be so easy for you to make it bae.
However,
I'm an expert at coming up with excuses as to why now isn't a good time. Can you believe she had the nerve about a week back to bring up the coffee table I've been restoring for 5 years? I thought she had forgot about that fecking thing long ago!

Anyway, Enough about the nag.

Pops and me are working super steady still. Finished the house in Volonia last week and we're framing a 900 foot mancave, for the same folk, in between the rain showers this week.

Got the hip roof raftered out and put the 2x6 band around it today. Like decking her in and some osb on the walls, should be walking away from it tomorrow.

I put in 14 hours last Saturday in Northern AR, setting trusses on a hunting lodge for a fellow. Place is right on the Little Black river and built on 11' stilts as the game and fish dams the river and floods the woods for duck hunting every year I'm told.

Love the name of the joint.
View attachment 115444

About and hour before we finished up here. 29 feet off the mud, using a feckin coal miner head light!
View attachment 115443

Serious business.
Sounds like great work to have in the nice weather we'd been having. We're about to be getting dark an hour earlier right quick.
 

newmisty

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I'll tell ya, there's nothing like going into someones comfortable home and start smashing and tearing their rooms apart and then get money for doing it! I love it. It keeps me from going farking bazerko. Anyway, today we got to tearing out the master bathroom and the tub and tile. It had been heard that smashing an iron tub up worked for getting it into manageable pieces for disposal and sure enough it verks!

I used a small 3 pound sledge cause we didn't have a have big one on site. It took several hard blows to get a small piece broken off. Ended up breaking off one half of the tub and carried the rest downstairs. It looks like a sintered metal.

The porcelain was really slivery coming off and at one point when striking the top, for about 5 seconds after striking it, several porcelain paint slivers were springin' and sproingin' off of it being flung from the vibrations.

Anywho here's a couple pics:
smashed cast 0.jpg
Smashed Cast 1.jpg
Smashed Cast.jpg


The ride home

Ride Home.jpg
 
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davycoppitt

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Been sleeping on the same queen sized mattress for over 15 years. Wife wants a new one (well me too). But we both agreed to go King size. Getting a hybrid spring/memory foam mattress. 15" thick and does not use a box spring. But because of its size and weight, it requires a platform instead of normal old school bed frame. Made the platform out of stand 2x8 material with 5/8" plywood....nothing special...but I did make a custom headboard that I though turned out nice.

Nice headboard. Wife and I got a king memory foam mattress and Amish bed frame. One of the best things Ive ever done. I sleep so much better and have allot less back pain.
 

hammerhead

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I was referencing the depth setting. The majority of roofing banshees "ratta tatta tat" their air nailer so fast, there's no way that the nails are flat and at the right depth as required.
Other than having to pull on a hose, that's the reason I hand bang 'em.
 

hammerhead

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I'll tell ya, there's nothing like going into someones comfortable home and start smashing and tearing their rooms apart and then get money for doing it! I love it. It keeps me from going farking bazerko. Anyway, today we got to tearing out the master bathroom and the tub and tile. It had been heard that smashing an iron tub up worked for getting it into manageable pieces for disposal and sure enough it verks!

I used a small 3 pound sledge cause we didn't have a have one on site. It took several hard blows to get a small piece broken off. Ended up breaking off one half of the tub and carried the rest downstairs. It looks like a sintered metal.

The porcelain was really slivery coming off and at one point when string the top, for about 5 seconds after striking it, several pocelain paint slivers were springin' and sproingin' off of it being flung from the vibrations.

Anywho here's a couple pics:
View attachment 115455 View attachment 115453 View attachment 115452

The ride home

View attachment 115457
Shrapnel city.
 

Silver

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That musta been catching lots of air. Very nice work. Stainless?
Headwind and rain the whole trip back and catchin' air - normally get 16/17 mpg when not hauling, 8/9 with the tank. Galvanized - stainless was twice the price, they line the inside with a food grade epoxy so the inside is the same either way. Galvanized should last 25/30 years, stainless 50.
 

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I forgot to post some before pics. Did one of you guys from the senile thread caulk a tub recently?

Calk 1.jpg
Calk 2.jpg
Calk 3.jpg
 

stonedywankanobe

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Indeed. I like to take a canvass painters throw and drape those old iron tubs before cracking them with the big hammer.

Jebus, mebe they were looking for a stucco like finish on the caulk joint there Mister? If so, nice work i say.
 

spinalcracker

On a mail train.
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newmisty

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I ain't gonna lie , I would not post any photos of my caulk in this thread...its really fugly.
Cracker has an ugly caulk. This is why we keep him in the back of the van.