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newmisty

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Very nice work...but 2 months??? Feel like I'm missing something.

Not sure if link works for non subscribers:

Dead Reckoning Craftsmanship
By Howard Brickman
DOWNLOAD THE PDF VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE. (662.82 KB)


The compass rose is the focal point of an eight-sided room.


The compass was inspired by a 17th century brass map.


The author inlaid the compass points in contrasting woods and veneer.


The center is a spiral of end-grain maple with a walnut burl center.
This project started as a consulting assignment. The architect, Donald Grose, called me in to evaluate the wood flooring that was being supplied for a client’s new home.

While walking through the house, we entered a well-lit octagonal room located at the far end of the house. Donald explained that the room would remain essentially unfurnished and be used for meditation. He also mentioned that the clients were going to buy a factory-made medallion as a focal point for the center of the room. As a former Air Force navigator, I have a special affinity for compass roses, and I thought that this would be a perfect spot for one.

At Donald’s urging, I mentioned my idea to the client, and after much discussion and research by the client, we were given a picture of a compass rose on a brass map from the 1600s. Working off the photo, Donald created a scaled drawing of the compass rose. The client asked me to make the compass rose look as close to the drawing as possible. Donald also generated a 6-foot-diameter paper template that we set on the subfloor in the proper orientation so that the flooring installers could make sure there were no nails where we needed to cut out flooring for the compass.

The flooring in the room was to be rift- and quarter-sawn white oak. I selected several boards of rift-sawn red oak and darker quarter-sawn white oak for fabricating the points of the compass and purchased some veneer sheets dyed black for the lines. I made the center circle with end-grain maple that spiraled inward to a dark center. That piece I cut out of a burly spot in a board that I had noticed near my work area in the client’s basement. The client told me that the board was milled from the crotch of an old walnut tree on the property that had been struck by lightning. For the directional letters, I got help from Jim Garth, of Decorative Flooring. He laser-cut the letters, inlaid them in polygons, and provided a template for me to rout out and drop in the letters at the four points.

The compass rose took a couple of months to complete, and it was the finishing touch in the home. The drawing and the actual compass rose turned out to be a close match. It was a real pleasure to work with a client and architect who came up with such a well-defined design and who had the patience to let me work through the details.
Photos by Howard Brickman

https://www.jlconline.com/how-to/in...cle&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=JLC_042819&
 

Bottom Feeder

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I noticed the article mentioned rift-sawn but there's also plain-sawn and quartersawn. What's the difference?

The easiest way to quickly assess different cuts of wood is to look at the end grain. A board with growth rings running roughly parallel—usually in arches—relative to the face of the board is called a plain-sawn (or flat-sawn) board. If the growth rings are at a steep angle relative to the face, the board is said to have quartersawn grain. If the growth rings run at a slightly lower angle, it’s called rift-sawn. The reason for the different cuts is that compared to plain-sawn boards, both quartersawn and rift-sawn boards are less likely to cup, and will experience less seasonal expansion and contraction across their widths. There are also notable differences in appearance, which is important to a carpenter or woodworker. Quartersawn lumber will have straight, uniform grain on two sides—the top and the bottom. Rift-sawn lumber will have that same straight, uniform grain on the top and bottom, but will also have nice parallel grain on the two edges.

Rift-Quarter-Plain.JPG
FYI for us tinkerers, I know you pros knew this already.

BF
 

Ironpig

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Very nice work...but 2 months??? Feel like I'm missing something.

Not sure if link works for non subscribers:

Dead Reckoning Craftsmanship
By Howard Brickman
DOWNLOAD THE PDF VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE. (662.82 KB)


The compass rose is the focal point of an eight-sided room.


The compass was inspired by a 17th century brass map.


The author inlaid the compass points in contrasting woods and veneer.


The center is a spiral of end-grain maple with a walnut burl center.
This project started as a consulting assignment. The architect, Donald Grose, called me in to evaluate the wood flooring that was being supplied for a client’s new home.

While walking through the house, we entered a well-lit octagonal room located at the far end of the house. Donald explained that the room would remain essentially unfurnished and be used for meditation. He also mentioned that the clients were going to buy a factory-made medallion as a focal point for the center of the room. As a former Air Force navigator, I have a special affinity for compass roses, and I thought that this would be a perfect spot for one.

At Donald’s urging, I mentioned my idea to the client, and after much discussion and research by the client, we were given a picture of a compass rose on a brass map from the 1600s. Working off the photo, Donald created a scaled drawing of the compass rose. The client asked me to make the compass rose look as close to the drawing as possible. Donald also generated a 6-foot-diameter paper template that we set on the subfloor in the proper orientation so that the flooring installers could make sure there were no nails where we needed to cut out flooring for the compass.

The flooring in the room was to be rift- and quarter-sawn white oak. I selected several boards of rift-sawn red oak and darker quarter-sawn white oak for fabricating the points of the compass and purchased some veneer sheets dyed black for the lines. I made the center circle with end-grain maple that spiraled inward to a dark center. That piece I cut out of a burly spot in a board that I had noticed near my work area in the client’s basement. The client told me that the board was milled from the crotch of an old walnut tree on the property that had been struck by lightning. For the directional letters, I got help from Jim Garth, of Decorative Flooring. He laser-cut the letters, inlaid them in polygons, and provided a template for me to rout out and drop in the letters at the four points.

The compass rose took a couple of months to complete, and it was the finishing touch in the home. The drawing and the actual compass rose turned out to be a close match. It was a real pleasure to work with a client and architect who came up with such a well-defined design and who had the patience to let me work through the details.
Photos by Howard Brickman

https://www.jlconline.com/how-to/in...cle&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=JLC_042819&
Two Months..............Nothin's easy! Nothin' !
 

newmisty

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newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
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Likes
34,404
Location
Qmerica
Yeah Right?!, This week I hung a new door in an old opening! What a nighmare! Pics to follow soon.
Rob told me about your situation. Praying for 100% health. Fa Zheng Qien Kun.