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So far I've learned you guys have HOA's
Hey up pit,

naww, no HOA's, just building codes. It isn't necessarily a bad thing either.
Many of these dimwit contractors and homeowners have no business in the trades. Building stuff that is insufficient and not safe.

Around here, to get a permit, you have to be a licensed contractor with insurance, in the cities, whereas in the hinterlands, you can get by just picking up a permit and in many cases no inspector ever shows up.

All well and good if you are just building something for yourself. I don't care if you electrocute yourself or your mutts. But, when you want to sell that and declare it as up to snuff, then I have a problem. There is no way a properly built structure should have the same valuation as a jackass built, all else equal. The exterior will show signs, but you have to know what to look for, and much of the defective workmanship will be hidden or covered up.

For those that know what they are doing, they can see it, but the avg slave just doesn't have the knowledge or ability to spot what we speak to.

In the end, codes are not a bad thing.
 

hoarder

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Around here, to get a permit, you have to be a licensed contractor with insurance,
Bureaucrats and insurance people add a lot of cost to buildings. Many of the codes are plain stupid and do nothing to ensure the building is done right, just written for "ease of enforcement". Inspections are a logistical nightmare. The only permit I had on my log home was for a septic system, and it's 1000% overkill at that. I realize something has to be done to prevent developers of spec homes, multi-family and commercial from taking short cuts, but government and insurance people are too good at grabbing money and power.
 

newmisty

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The worst offences tend to be with building decks. The deck to house connection is super critical and many guys were just shooting some 16 penny nails into the ledger and a few years later the deck would be full of party goers and collapse killing and crushing folks. So IMO some codes are good while many are plain silly. One popular code is what we called "the 4" ball test". When spacing balusters they need to be no greater than 4" supposedly to prevent a babies head from getting through. It's not a play pen for gawds sake! Anyway, some counties don't have building codes, like the one where the Buddist retreat I remedied and posted some time back. The frggin hardi planks were falling off of the place!
 

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A few pics here of the Dryvit finish.
IMG_1741.JPG


IMG_1742.JPG


Gets metal handrails at some point.
Knowing that they would be using this as a carport it was decided that we would run Metal roofing panels on the underside of the 2 x 12 joist to catch the water that would inevitably fall between the deck boards.

Shot the grade on the structure with 2 1/2 inches of fall so the water would shed away from the house. Kept the metal a few inches short of the inside wall so that gutter and downspouts could be installed inside to tame the flow.

Here's a look, no gutters yet.
IMG_1746.JPG


And the view from up top...at the center of corruption in Arkansas.
IMG_1740.JPG
 

newmisty

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A few pics here of the Dryvit finish.
View attachment 134814

View attachment 134815

Gets metal handrails at some point.
Knowing that they would be using this as a carport it was decided that we would run Metal roofing panels on the underside of the 2 x 12 joist to catch the water that would inevitably fall between the deck boards.

Shot the grade on the structure with 2 1/2 inches of fall so the water would shed away from the house. Kept the metal a few inches short of the inside wall so that gutter and downspouts could be installed inside to tame the flow.

Here's a look, no gutters yet.
View attachment 134818

And the view from up top...at the center of corruption in Arkansas.
View attachment 134819
Wow! That looks snappy sir StOnEy! Nice and clean.
 

davycoppitt

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Working at my favorite place yesterday and today. Its an old hotel in downtown MLPS. The old man at our shop has taken care of the place for 40 years, now Im taking over.

So yesterday Im changin out this compressor on a 30 ton until from 1984. New unit would be 80k. We have our truck driver there with the crane and I get a call from the shop. We are sending the new apprentice to watch the crane and learn how to load. Now the new apprentice is in the stake bed truck. I told the shop No there are too many people in the parking lot. Don't send him. (Small lot that is alway full. ) So they send him anyway. As he is pulling in he is watching the crane and takes out a car in the parking lot. Great! Then the crane gets stuck in the air. The cable wrapped around the boom and he could not lower it. Guy says he has been doing this for 15 years and never seen this before. We were able to lower it onto the ground enough to get it unhooked.

So get all that behind us. I get the unit all ready to fire up and poof. Smoke. They sent me the wrong contactors. The control voltage of the contactors were 120v coils , but we had 230V control voltage. I missed it with all the chaos. Damn gotta buy new ones. $200 each. After all that get the thing up and running. Working perfect.

Get a call this morning that there is lots oil under the compressor. Turns out the equalizer line from the hot gas bypass to the suction broke and blew all the refrigerant and oil. Old copper must have gotten work hardened and when we moved it crack. Replace that line and 100 lbs of refrigerant later and we are cooling.

Owner there is awesome to deal with. I have about a months worth of work at the place. Pretty much everything on the building is old and in need of allot of work. Got an open book to do pretty much whatever needs to be done and they never complain about the bill or time spent there.




compressor 2.JPG


compressor.JPG
 

smooth

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Incredible Wanka...
Started cutting my stair jacks, 3/16th MDF probably not to code. But I got a good deal on it!
Seriously though, I dont permit my work, but try to stay at least within code. I plan to sell the place in a few years and escape from this state. Figure if shit is within code I should have less issues when I go to sell. I'm choosing to put rails on the deck. Not for myself or my grandson, but more so for the older folks when we have gatherings.
Also added a second 8' beam between nail header and main beam in the middle of the deck in case we decide to put a decent sized wading pool for Little Monster later this summer.
stair jack.jpg
 
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newmisty

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Incredible Wanka...
Started cutting my stair jacks, 3/16th MDF probably not to code. But I got a good deal on it!
Seriously though, I dont permit my work, but try to stay at least within code. I plan to sell the place in a few years and escape from this state. Figure if shit is within code I should have less issues when I go to sell. I'm choosing to put rails on the deck. Not for myself or my grandson, but more so for the older folks when we have gatherings.
Also added a second 8' beam between nail header and main beam in the middle of the deck in case we decide to put a decent sized wading pool for Little Monster later this summer.
View attachment 134823
Make sure you use ring shanks on that MDF. :p
 

smooth

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Then the crane gets stuck in the air. The cable wrapped around the boom and he could not lower it.
How does that happen? worked around cranes all my life and operated RT's for several years. Never heard of such a thing. Did have a horrible rats nest of cable in the drum once. 150# headache ball fell about 20' and almost hit my boss. Took me the rest of the day to get it unraveled. It was totally my fault.
 

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Working at my favorite place yesterday and today. Its an old hotel in downtown MLPS. The old man at our shop has taken care of the place for 40 years, now Im taking over.

So yesterday Im changin out this compressor on a 30 ton until from 1984. New unit would be 80k. We have our truck driver there with the crane and I get a call from the shop. We are sending the new apprentice to watch the crane and learn how to load. Now the new apprentice is in the stake bed truck. I told the shop No there are too many people in the parking lot. Don't send him. (Small lot that is alway full. ) So they send him anyway. As he is pulling in he is watching the crane and takes out a car in the parking lot. Great! Then the crane gets stuck in the air. The cable wrapped around the boom and he could not lower it. Guy says he has been doing this for 15 years and never seen this before. We were able to lower it onto the ground enough to get it unhooked.

So get all that behind us. I get the unit all ready to fire up and poof. Smoke. They sent me the wrong contactors. The control voltage of the contactors were 120v coils , but we had 230V control voltage. I missed it with all the chaos. Damn gotta buy new ones. $200 each. After all that get the thing up and running. Working perfect.

Get a call this morning that there is lots oil under the compressor. Turns out the equalizer line from the hot gas bypass to the suction broke and blew all the refrigerant and oil. Old copper must have gotten work hardened and when we moved it crack. Replace that line and 100 lbs of refrigerant later and we are cooling.

Owner there is awesome to deal with. I have about a months worth of work at the place. Pretty much everything on the building is old and in need of allot of work. Got an open book to do pretty much whatever needs to be done and they never complain about the bill or time spent there.




View attachment 134820

View attachment 134822
One of those days. Hope they don't happen too often.
 

newmisty

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Working at my favorite place yesterday and today. Its an old hotel in downtown MLPS. The old man at our shop has taken care of the place for 40 years, now Im taking over.

So yesterday Im changin out this compressor on a 30 ton until from 1984. New unit would be 80k. We have our truck driver there with the crane and I get a call from the shop. We are sending the new apprentice to watch the crane and learn how to load. Now the new apprentice is in the stake bed truck. I told the shop No there are too many people in the parking lot. Don't send him. (Small lot that is alway full. ) So they send him anyway. As he is pulling in he is watching the crane and takes out a car in the parking lot. Great! Then the crane gets stuck in the air. The cable wrapped around the boom and he could not lower it. Guy says he has been doing this for 15 years and never seen this before. We were able to lower it onto the ground enough to get it unhooked.

So get all that behind us. I get the unit all ready to fire up and poof. Smoke. They sent me the wrong contactors. The control voltage of the contactors were 120v coils , but we had 230V control voltage. I missed it with all the chaos. Damn gotta buy new ones. $200 each. After all that get the thing up and running. Working perfect.

Get a call this morning that there is lots oil under the compressor. Turns out the equalizer line from the hot gas bypass to the suction broke and blew all the refrigerant and oil. Old copper must have gotten work hardened and when we moved it crack. Replace that line and 100 lbs of refrigerant later and we are cooling.

Owner there is awesome to deal with. I have about a months worth of work at the place. Pretty much everything on the building is old and in need of allot of work. Got an open book to do pretty much whatever needs to be done and they never complain about the bill or time spent there.




View attachment 134820

View attachment 134822
Minga Joey! Glad everything got worked out in the end. Guess that kid learned at least one lesson that day.
 

davycoppitt

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How does that happen? worked around cranes all my life and operated RT's for several years. Never heard of such a thing. Did have a horrible rats nest of cable in the drum once. 150# headache ball fell about 20' and almost hit my boss. Took me the rest of the day to get it unraveled. It was totally my fault.
No clue it was insane. So one of the cables flipped 360 around the boom and the hooked the back of the boom right where it extends. I'm thinking he was lowering the cables way too fast. They were empty with no weight and a slight wind.
 

newmisty

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Regarding code, There is something called "Best Practice" JLC(Journal of Light Construction) has a book JLC Field Guide to Residential Construction which is my go to source for doing something in "Best Practice" which I try to follow as much as is possible on a given project. Sometimes it's too overkill for the budget but I am able to integrate ideas that surpass code so as to deliver the best product possible. I want my stuff to be nice and hold up for as long as possible for everybody's sake.

Here's a link to the book. I didn't pay near that amount but I had bought it at a JLC convention years back. Most of it is found in their magazine articles which have good pictures to boot. I think they can be found with a search engine. I had a subscription forever so if anyone needs info on a particular project let me know and I can probably dig it up for you.

https://www.amazon.com/JLC-Field-Guide-Residential-Construction/dp/1928580246

https://www.jlconline.com/how-to/
 

hoarder

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No clue it was insane. So one of the cables flipped 360 around the boom and the hooked the back of the boom right where it extends. I'm thinking he was lowering the cables way too fast. They were empty with no weight and a slight wind.
Every crane ball is weighted and 4 part hooks have "cheek weights" precisely for that reason. Seems to me that either there was not enough weight on the hook or the boom point sheave bearing is bad, slowing the sheave which would allow the line to get slack on the way down.
 

newmisty

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Anybody have experience removing scratches from glass. I done farked up.
 

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What glass?

Golden Regards
Uncle
 

newmisty

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What glass?

Golden Regards
Uncle
Tempered glass panes on a wooden front door. Orbital sander slip. :(

I tried some clear nail polish and that was a failure. I'm afraid of using a compound and making it worse. Silver, got any experience with that?
 

Silver

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Tempered glass panes on a wooden front door. Orbital sander slip. :(

I tried some clear nail polish and that was a failure. I'm afraid of using a compound and making it worse. Silver, got any experience with that?
No, I don't. I would think you would have to polish the whole piece of glass if you did try to polish it. Spot treating would probably stick out.

It had to be the front door, dang. Hope you figure something out. One thing I learned long ago is to never point out your flaws :)
 

newmisty

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No, I don't. I would think you would have to polish the whole piece of glass if you did try to polish it. Spot treating would probably stick out.

It had to be the front door, dang. Hope you figure something out. One thing I learned long ago is to never point out your flaws :)
Good advise! It shouldn't stand out until someone goes to clean the glass. I fear the cleaning lady will be doing her thing and mention something. THink I'm going to leave it until/if it's brought up. The refinished door looks great but I can't feel satisfaction with this blunder. Fark. Lesson learned though.
 

Silver

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Good advise! It shouldn't stand out until someone goes to clean the glass. I fear the cleaning lady will be doing her thing and mention something. THink I'm going to leave it until/if it's brought up. The refinished door looks great but I can't feel satisfaction with this blunder. Fark. Lesson learned though.
If the customer brings it up, you can deal with it then. If the overall appearance looks good, nobody but you will know.
 

newmisty

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If the customer brings it up, you can deal with it then. If the overall appearance looks good, nobody but you will know.
Gawd, I'm hoping. Thanks bro.
 

newmisty

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It was already like that.
Had to be! :beer: It was the same guys that used interior stain on the exterior so it musta been them. It's only noticeable now cause the door looks new!
 

hoarder

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Glass is a liquid. It should heal itself....in about 80 years.
 

Uncle

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Tempered glass panes on a wooden front door. Orbital sander slip. :(

I tried some clear nail polish and that was a failure. I'm afraid of using a compound and making it worse. Silver, got any experience with that?
In order of cut

1. White tooth paste.
2. Baking soda.
3. Metal polish. We have a local one called Brasso.
4. Med cut rubbing compound.

All require a lot of elbow grease, even with a polishing/buff attachment on a drill or similar, so it will be obvious you're spending time there.

Good luck.

Golden Regards
Uncle
 

newmisty

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Guess I'll just replace the panes if it comes to that. What a pain.
 

smooth

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Things should start moving much quicker now that my young helper is on sight. The kid is a ball of fire and willing to do anything!! At this pace I'll be done by the end of the year!!!
apprentice.jpg
 

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Uglytruth

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Do it right, take pride in it and fix it. It's good for YOUR soul........ and reputation.



In many cases, lightly scratched tempered glass can be restored to its original beauty without the expense of replacing it. First, clean the glass thoroughly with glass cleaner and a soft rag so you can get a good look at the damage. If the scratch catches your fingernail, it may be too deep to remove with DIY methods. In this case, the best course of action is to request help from a professional.

Attempt to Remove Scratches from Tempered Glass

You have a few compounds available to use as a tempered glass scratch remover. Follow these steps to help you restore the glass with the least amount of effort.

Toothpaste and a Soft Cloth

Apply a small amount of whitening toothpaste, which is slightly more abrasive than regular toothpaste, to a soft, clean cloth. Buff the scratched glass in small circular motions. The grit in the toothpaste is enough to remove small scratches from tempered glass.


After rubbing for a few minutes, rinse the glass with water to reveal what you’ve accomplished. If the scratch remains but seems to be getting better, repeat the process up to two more times. Move on to the next step if the scratch is still there after three attempts to remove it with toothpaste.

Liquid Pumice Soap or Steel Wool

Trade out the toothpaste for pumice soap. This heavy-duty hand cleaner has additional abrasive elements that may remove scratches from tempered glass more effectively.


You can also try #0000 steel wool. This super fine grade pad buffs the glass without creating more scratches. Make sure the steel wool is in good condition since the presence of any rust or other imperfections could scratch the glass when you attempt to buff it.


Whether you use liquid pumice soap and a soft cloth or #0000 steel wool, buff the scratched glass by hand in small circular motions for several minutes. Rinse the glass of any residue to assess your work. If scratches remain, it’s time to pull out the power tools.

Buffers or Sanders

Buy a commercial buffing compound designed to remove scratches or polish metals. Popular options include cerium oxide and jeweler’s rouge. Apply the compound you choose to an orbital sander fitted with a soft cloth or a buffing wheel on a cordless drill.


Polish the scratched glass with the sander or buffer while you continually moisten the area by lightly squeezing out a trickle of water from a saturated sponge. This prevents the compound from drying out and creating more scratches.


After several minutes, set the sander or drill down and clean the glass with a soft brush and liquid dish soap. Dry the glass and inspect the scratches. Repeat these steps until you’re satisfied with the results.
 

newmisty

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Do it right, take pride in it and fix it. It's good for YOUR soul........ and reputation.



In many cases, lightly scratched tempered glass can be restored to its original beauty without the expense of replacing it. First, clean the glass thoroughly with glass cleaner and a soft rag so you can get a good look at the damage. If the scratch catches your fingernail, it may be too deep to remove with DIY methods. In this case, the best course of action is to request help from a professional.

Attempt to Remove Scratches from Tempered Glass

You have a few compounds available to use as a tempered glass scratch remover. Follow these steps to help you restore the glass with the least amount of effort.

Toothpaste and a Soft Cloth

Apply a small amount of whitening toothpaste, which is slightly more abrasive than regular toothpaste, to a soft, clean cloth. Buff the scratched glass in small circular motions. The grit in the toothpaste is enough to remove small scratches from tempered glass.


After rubbing for a few minutes, rinse the glass with water to reveal what you’ve accomplished. If the scratch remains but seems to be getting better, repeat the process up to two more times. Move on to the next step if the scratch is still there after three attempts to remove it with toothpaste.

Liquid Pumice Soap or Steel Wool

Trade out the toothpaste for pumice soap. This heavy-duty hand cleaner has additional abrasive elements that may remove scratches from tempered glass more effectively.


You can also try #0000 steel wool. This super fine grade pad buffs the glass without creating more scratches. Make sure the steel wool is in good condition since the presence of any rust or other imperfections could scratch the glass when you attempt to buff it.


Whether you use liquid pumice soap and a soft cloth or #0000 steel wool, buff the scratched glass by hand in small circular motions for several minutes. Rinse the glass of any residue to assess your work. If scratches remain, it’s time to pull out the power tools.

Buffers or Sanders

Buy a commercial buffing compound designed to remove scratches or polish metals. Popular options include cerium oxide and jeweler’s rouge. Apply the compound you choose to an orbital sander fitted with a soft cloth or a buffing wheel on a cordless drill.


Polish the scratched glass with the sander or buffer while you continually moisten the area by lightly squeezing out a trickle of water from a saturated sponge. This prevents the compound from drying out and creating more scratches.


After several minutes, set the sander or drill down and clean the glass with a soft brush and liquid dish soap. Dry the glass and inspect the scratches. Repeat these steps until you’re satisfied with the results.
I'd like to see the results. I'll check out some videos.

Or I'll just say, "You can;t see it from my house!" (Kidding!)
 

smooth

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Or tell them to buy a new door if they don't like the rehabbed one. You can't make a silk purse from a sows ear.
Much truth here.
 

engineear

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Guess I'll just replace the panes if it comes to that. What a pain.
Was reading through this and was going to say...you messed it up, tell them and replace it. Glad to see you'll do that. Once told, the owner might say, " not that bad, thanks for showing me, I can live with it." Your reputation stays stellar and the guy tells others about your great work and honesty. Karma works both ways. Great work by the way, enjoying your progress on these job sites.

I've been working with tempered glass lenses for decades and once hardened it's near impossible, depending on depth of scratch, to make it appear normal again.
 

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Things should start moving much quicker now that my young helper is on sight. The kid is a ball of fire and willing to do anything!! At this pace I'll be done by the end of the year!!!
View attachment 134954
Little monster is figuring out how long you've been there.