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newmisty

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Our Anti-Viral Paint Is Iron Clad Protection. No Fear Anti-Viral Formula.
I think we're really onto something here!
 

newmisty

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Spray day for the top coat...


IMG_20200609_132731541.jpg
IMG_20200609_132904146.jpg
 

newmisty

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The newest acquisition to the DeWalt cordless lineup...decent unit with decent sound.

IMG_20200609_132723825.jpg
 

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This pairing of blade and tool is the best thing since sliced bread. Dremel or Bosch carbide tipped blades will cut 16d nail after nail, job after job and still cut wood and drywall with ease. Combined with the quick blade release system on the DeWalt, it's the chit. Highly recommended.

IMG_20200609_133203869.jpg
IMG_20200609_133220693.jpg
 

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Those oscillating saws save a lot of grief remodeling, beats a hammer and chisel.
 

newmisty

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Those oscillating saws save a lot of grief remodeling, beats a hammer and chisel.
And by far beats the Sawzall which was the go-to for many of those hard to reach areas. One of my next acquisitions will be the cordless power planer.
 

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And by far beats the Sawzall which was the go-to for many of those hard to reach areas. One of my next acquisitions will be the cordless power planer.
I've bent so many sawsall blades trying to get into tight places, the oscillating blade saves a lot frustration and does a cleaner job.

What kind of cordless planer? The only planer I have is a 20" grizzly - just ordered some carbide knives, tired of the quickly dulled HHS knives planing hardwoods..
 

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I've bent so many sawsall blades trying to get into tight places, the oscillating blade saves a lot frustration and does a cleaner job.

What kind of cordless planer? The only planer I have is a 20" grizzly - just ordered some carbide knives, tired of the quickly dulled HHS knives planing hardwoods..
I've got two corded planers, one now as a "beater" but going to get the DeWalt. Have the sawzall, impact driver, drill and circsaw. My buddy has the same with better circular saw and flashlight, which we thought wouldn't be that useful but has proved us wrong.
 
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newmisty

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I've bent so many sawsall blades trying to get into tight places, the oscillating blade saves a lot frustration and does a cleaner job.

What kind of cordless planer? The only planer I have is a 20" grizzly - just ordered some carbide knives, tired of the quickly dulled HHS knives planing hardwoods..
Here's the DeWalt cordless:


This is the one that I used the plane down the two-by-fours on that outside bar I made a couple years ago that I posted in this thread:



They are super handy for planing various things...joists, studs, trim, you name it.
 
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newmisty

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newmisty

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Here's my bar, laid every brick, formed the bar top, laid the concrete, and polished it.

View attachment 168424
Beautiful work! You're certainly a better bricklayer than I am.
Was that your first concrete countertop? How did it fare overall it looks excellent. I still need to do countertops in my kitchen and have been back and forth debating all sorts of various materials. They're either time-consuming expensive or crap!
 

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Beautiful work! You're certainly a better bricklayer than I am.
Was that your first concrete countertop? How did it fare overall it looks excellent. I still need to do countertops in my kitchen and have been back and forth debating all sorts of various materials. They're either time-consuming expensive or crap!
Yes, 1st concrete counter top. The forming was pretty straight forward, used melamine sheets for the forming material and braced the crap out of it - plus lot of steel in the forms. Used 5500 psi concrete and charcoal dye, wet sanded with diamond pads using an old random orbital plugged into GFCI outlet with a 5 gallon bucket of water and a sponge - made a hell of a mess. Sealed the concrete with oil based sealer. Carnauba wax final topcoat (not done in pic).

I've done a couple of other smaller counter tops outside and carried in to install, much cleaner. The bar is several thousand pounds so moving wasn't an option.

Concrete is a pretty inexpensive method, but labor intensive with the polishing.

Brick laying is not bad, with a string line and guideposts it can look like a pro did it (sorta), but a slow pro.

edit to add: If you do counter tops in the forms and place them, it is better all around, if it isn't too heavy. Using melamine in the bottom of the form (silicon all the seams in forms so there are no sharp edges) will make a very smooth top and it will be much easier to wet sand and polish. The top that you trowel will be on the bottom and you don't need to do anything with it, but if you cast in place, you have to grind down the troweled surface with very coarse grit diamond pads and it will beat you up on a big top.
 
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newmisty

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Yes, 1st concrete counter top. The forming was pretty straight forward, used melamine sheets for the forming material and braced the crap out of it - plus lot of steel in the forms. Used 5500 psi concrete and charcoal dye, wet sanded with diamond pads using an old random orbital plugged into GFCI outlet with a 5 gallon bucket of water and a sponge - made a hell of a mess. Sealed the concrete with oil based sealer. Carnauba wax final topcoat (not done in pic).

I've done a couple of other smaller counter tops outside and carried in to install, much cleaner. The bar is several thousand pounds so moving wasn't an option.

Concrete is a pretty inexpensive method, but labor intensive with the polishing.

Brick laying is not bad, with a string line and guideposts it can look like a pro did it (sorta), but a slow pro.

edit to add: If you do counter tops in the forms and place them, it is better all around, if it isn't too heavy. Using melamine in the bottom of the form (silicon all the seams in forms so there are no sharp edges) will make a very smooth top and it will be much easier to wet sand and polish. The top that you trowel will be on the bottom and you don't need to do anything with it, but if you cast in place, you have to grind down the troweled surface with very coarse grit diamond pads and it will beat you up on a big top.
What size and pattern of steel did you use in the form?
 

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What size and pattern of steel did you use in the form?
Used 1/2" rebar around the perimeter (2 layers) and then a 6" criss cross pattern, also had concretes stakes every couple of feet secured into the wood substructure to support the top from ever tipping, especially before I had the brick corbals supporting the top on the 'customer side'.
 

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Used 1/2" rebar around the perimeter (2 layers) and then a 6" criss cross pattern, also had concretes stakes every couple of feet secured into the wood substructure to support the top from ever tipping, especially before I had the brick corbals supporting the top on the 'customer side'.
Damn, that thing ain't going anywhere.
 

newmisty

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Used 1/2" rebar around the perimeter (2 layers) and then a 6" criss cross pattern, also had concretes stakes every couple of feet secured into the wood substructure to support the top from ever tipping, especially before I had the brick corbals supporting the top on the 'customer side'.
Didn't really notice the corbels at first, did you add those after the fact? Looks like maybe two layers of brick?
 

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Damn, that thing ain't going anywhere.
Not even a hint of a crack, but did have a few little voids that I had to fill. Pro tip, get a concrete vibrator, they have cheap ones at Harbour - I used an old vibrating sander on the outside of the forms, but it would have been better to have had a real concrete vibrator.
 

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Didn't really notice the corbels at first, did you add those after the fact? Looks like maybe two layers of brick?
Two layers of corbels, one layer of brick, all part of the plan. Lots of concrete ties embedded in the courses. The brick wall behind is tied to 12" concrete block, layer of foil foam board between. All the ties had to be secured with concrete screws into the block (pre-drill everyone - pita, 100's in the wall). All the hidden shit.
 

newmisty

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Two layers of corbels, one layer of brick, all part of the plan. Lots of concrete ties embedded in the courses. The brick wall behind is tied to 12" concrete block, layer of foil foam board between. All the ties had to be secured with concrete screws into the block (pre-drill everyone - pita, 100's in the wall). All the hidden shit.
Rugged for the win!
 

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Today is 'glory day' ... peeling off the tape

IMG_20200610_103128842.jpg


IMG_20200610_105738275.jpg
 
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newmisty

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Attn Davy: AC getting installed today...

Can u splain what's happening here?




IMG_20200610_122141569_HDR.jpg
 

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Old deck...all sorts of phuckery going on here. Deck boards are almost exclusively 2 by 6 but then on this one landing they suddenly change to five quarter...
IMG_20200611_140753048.jpg


Homeowner had rainwater catchment system put below deck but the wall is still getting covered with water. Drilled holes right at the curse of the new board I put down to settle that problem.
IMG_20200611_154200953.jpg


IMG_20200611_135621540.jpg
IMG_20200611_161455574.jpg
IMG_20200611_135751728_HDR.jpg



This Landing dive down into directions and I think the reason they did it was to keep the riser heights similar. Never seen anything like it before.
IMG_20200611_140742619.jpg
 
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newmisty

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Broke put my Japanese hand plane. Was a gift from one of the first construction companies I worked for in Maine. It
IMG_20200612_115641534.jpg
IMG_20200612_115722073.jpg
IMG_20200612_115715008.jpg
's saving the day today...
 

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newmisty

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One of today's small projects (stepped away from house renovation for a few days while other trades catch up)...

IMG_20200611_140731928.jpg


IMG_20200612_113643960.jpg


IMG_20200612_145156640.jpg
 

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Attn Davy: AC getting installed today...

Can u splain what's happening here?




View attachment 168572

Just checking superheat and subcooling to get the correct charge. He has the newfangled gauges that do all the work for you. I use old gauges and a Pressure temperature chart.
I shoot for a little higher superheat than most 15-18 degrees on 410A, that way you have no chance of liquid hitting the compressor and washing out the oil. Don't have to get too fussy on a residential system. Looks like a nice unit. If its running high head pressure it would be because its boxed in, again most likely will not be an issue, but you will want to make sure that coil is always clean as can be and not full of cottonwood.
 
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Those oscillating saws save a lot of grief remodeling, beats a hammer and chisel.
A most invaluable tool for log home construction, as hammers and chisels and sweat were used before. The guys who assembled mine used them to cut out every electrical outlet and I used one with a sanding attachment to sand the corner joinery.
 

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Crazyness....

We used Behr Premium Ultra Paint & primer in one on the ceiling and walls. The sheen was flat but once painted there was an obvious sheen. The paint guy says that they've been having problems with this particular product doing that same thing. So they gave us some new paint and we used "dead flat" on the ceiling.

Meanwhile there were some pretty hefty interpersonal conflicts taking place today. Added to that was the plumber having messed up by not installing gas for the range. Meanwhile he did this:


Then as we were wrapping up today there was a water leak by the new toilet. It was a manic Monday for sure. There was something in the air today. I hope it blows by before tomorrow!
 

newmisty

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A most invaluable tool for log home construction, as hammers and chisels and sweat were used before. The guys who assembled mine used them to cut out every electrical outlet and I used one with a sanding attachment to sand the corner joinery.
Did they just make a series of small cuts and then chisel them out?
 

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Crazyness....

We used Behr Premium Ultra Paint & primer in one on the ceiling and walls. The sheen was flat but once painted there was an obvious sheen. The paint guy says that they've been having problems with this particular product doing that same thing. So they gave us some new paint and we used "dead flat" on the ceiling.

Meanwhile there were some pretty hefty interpersonal conflicts taking place today. Added to that was the plumber having messed up by not installing gas for the range. Meanwhile he did this:


Then as we were wrapping up today there was a water leak by the new toilet. It was a manic Monday for sure. There was something in the air today. I hope it blows by before tomorrow!
What are we looking at here? What is the reason for the grey mortar smeared on the white mortar?
 

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What are we looking at here? What is the reason for the grey mortar smeared on the white mortar?
the picture was to show the brick blow out from when he drilled the hole for the dryer vent. The gray is the mortar repair done to the cracks that were in the brick. The brick's going to be getting painted gray.
 

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Landscapers original estimate was 20 grand. Turned in a bill today for 37,000. Good, trustworthy guy, but where do you ended up having to do was a lot more than anybody bargained for.
 

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Here's my bar, laid every brick, formed the bar top, laid the concrete, and polished it.

View attachment 168424
great job...heres a few of pix of the one i did in my place 8-9yrs ago took me 3 months did all the tops and backspashes before concrete was cool..all formed and poured in place...not sure i would do it again LOL
 

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great job...heres a few of pix of the one i did in my place 8-9yrs ago took me 3 months did all the tops and backspashes before concrete was cool..all formed and poured in place...not sure i would do it again LOL
That's fantastic! No matter how smooth you finish the wet concrete, it still takes a massive effort to polish it. I'll bet you had slurry everywhere, lol. I've done lots of things I'm not sure I would do again - both feet and no looking back!

Did you have Changs book back then? I think I bought it around that time, lent it out and never got it back.
 

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That's fantastic! No matter how smooth you finish the wet concrete, it still takes a massive effort to polish it. I'll bet you had slurry everywhere, lol. I've done lots of things I'm not sure I would do again - both feet and no looking back!

Did you have Changs book back then? I think I bought it around that time, lent it out and never got it back.
Lol...no clue what changs is....figured out my own process did samples ...the the work.....absolutely zero wet finishing....poured it ....wire brushed it...then used a self leveling epoxy glaze on it....years later it still looks the same
 

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Couple weeks ago I performed a fatal flaw... Stretching my tape measure beyond its tipping point and ruined it. It was a 25-foot FatMax. The other day my carpenter and I were at Home Cheapo and we found one package of two fat Max's for twenty bucks, which is half price, so I bought them and gave him one and now we're both happy again. Last year I broke his FatMax and bought him a cheaper replacement so a good time to pay him back. They claim the stand out on these new ones is 14 ft.... We determined the only way that's possible is if you have at least a 6-foot wingspan and hold your arm out on the extended part of the tape as far out as you can. My favorite tape measure though for sure. I've had a bunch of FatMax products and I've been happy with all of them.

IMG_20200617_151251376.jpg
 
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