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workin man

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I was working at a truck shop in 1980 and the boss wanted me to learn how to weld. He gave me 10 minutes of instruction and 20 minutes of ridicule and I've been welding ever since. Still worthy of ridicule.
Stick welding is easy to learn and simple. If you have to weld thin steel under 14 gauge you will have to get into wire welding. I have had 3 (flux core) wire welders and spend more time repairing them than welding with them. If you want one that actually works you might have to spend some serious coin.
Stick welders are dirt cheap and no maintenance so that's the best place for a newbie to start.
I've never used a self darkening helmet, too rich for my blood. I bought my first stick welder brand new including hood for less than what one of those fancy helmets cost.
The biggest problem I have is vision. Reading glasses are only effective out to about 16" and a lot of welding positions require more like 20 to 30", so I can't see the puddle unless I can get my head up close.
 

arminius

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I spent a few years in the steel mills on the south side of chitcago. I worked in the 53-54 inch structural mill where we rolled Ibeams for large buildings. When I was there we rolled out the beams for the sears tower. My first job there was as an oiler. Picture a building 80 yards wide and 300 yards long with a conveyer belt ran down the center. The steel rollers in this conveyer were 9 feet long and at least 3 feet in diameter. My job was to keep the oil vats for each mill and set of rollers full. The steel would come in at the hot end in large red hot bricks 6 by 6 by 9 foot. The first mill the ingot would go thru was called the rougher, and it began the process of converting the ingot into an Ibeam. There were always lips on the top edges of the ingot which when it went thru the rougher would shoot out bits of red hot steel. Always had to watch when it got to that process and be behind something. The steel went thru the mills became an Ibeam, and were cut at the cold end by a huge circular saw into what they needed. I had a few pet cats there in that mill that I would toss a bite to occasionally. They were all steel grey in color, all of em.
 

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ttazzman

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I was working at a truck shop in 1980 and the boss wanted me to learn how to weld. He gave me 10 minutes of instruction and 20 minutes of ridicule and I've been welding ever since. Still worthy of ridicule.
Stick welding is easy to learn and simple. If you have to weld thin steel under 14 gauge you will have to get into wire welding. I have had 3 (flux core) wire welders and spend more time repairing them than welding with them. If you want one that actually works you might have to spend some serious coin.
Stick welders are dirt cheap and no maintenance so that's the best place for a newbie to start.
I've never used a self darkening helmet, too rich for my blood. I bought my first stick welder brand new including hood for less than what one of those fancy helmets cost.
The biggest problem I have is vision. Reading glasses are only effective out to about 16" and a lot of welding positions require more like 20 to 30", so I can't see the puddle unless I can get my head up close.

my experience with wire welders has been the opposite (unless the rollers were wore out)

but my biggest problem is exactly yours.......the glasses issue and distance .....have the same issue with mechanic work also cant get the right distance for eyes or glasses...as im sure you know its extremely frustrating sometimes
 

hammerhead

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EoYvIW2XIAELsif.jpeg
 

Goldhedge

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Well, that's what the drawing indicates does it not?
 

hoarder

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Well, that's what the drawing indicates does it not?
Thats why drawings come with "East elevation" and "North elevation" and "West elevation" and South elevation".
 

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Isn't much craftmanship in this project but I did have a lot of fun! I hate shopping so every year I try hard to get out of it. Last year I had a huge pile of birch firewood so I pealed some of the prettier bark off and wrapped it around led candles.
 

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Brio

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This year I had a friend weld up the grandfather's cattle brand in small size. I work at the plywood plant now and we brought home 14 pickup loads of cores, that's what's left over after the veneer has been peeled off, makes great (free) firewood. Used a chop saw and cut a hundred or so 1/4" cookies. Got the fire pit roaring hot, branded them all. Not many even knew our grandfather had a brand so everyone gets coasters branded with the family brand. And I never did go shopping YAY ME!
 

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Uglytruth

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Putting a whole lot of faith in the carpenters that installed that railing................
 

D-FENZ

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The old adage that 'form follows function' holds true even in this cluster'.

Looks like a typical third-world jobsite without the usual, harum-scarum scaffolding. But those stairs... Ain't no way I would get near them, let alone on them. The upper flight doesn't look strong enough to hold itself up. I would much rather be the electrician on the ladder, hanging the fan in Hammer's other post. At least the guy would have the possibility of a relatively soft landing.
 

engineear

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18 80 pound sacks of quickcrete and 1 90pound sack of Portland cement later and maybe I’ll finish up this flowerbed next spring




View attachment 194314
And when it's all done she says..." I thought it was gonna be taller...can you make it taller?"...in a thick Brooklyn accent whine.
 

Brio

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And when it's all done she says..." I thought it was gonna be taller...can you make it taller?"...in a thick Brooklyn accent whine.

I think it's a little too high, can you shave it down a bit?
 

glockngold

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18 80 pound sacks of quickcrete and 1 90pound sack of Portland cement later and maybe I’ll finish up this flowerbed next spring
Gotta ask,
Why the portland?
To add strength throughout each bag of quickrete, or as a topping slurry?
 

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spinalcracker

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Did you make those radius's with thinner wood?

I also add portland to sacrette.

yes , we used 1/4 inch Masonite

next up , a wheelchair ramp will be poured from the curb to the front door , and decorative rock will go between curb and flowerbed....probably be spring , it’s getting cold here.
 

spinalcracker

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Spinal, were you done pouring by lunch? I mean was it all poured at one time?

I should have been done before noon but got a late start and then had to stop 3 times and talk to neighbors as they would drive by

back in the day when we were running jobs , the basic rule of thumb for the number of cement masons to hire when working on curbs and gutters was 100’ feet per man per day......and that included setting up the forms , pouring and finishing , and stripping the forms for the next day...

but if we really hustled , a good finisher can do 2-300’ a day with a good laborer as a helper.....ask me how I know
 

hammerhead

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I should have been done before noon but got a late start and then had to stop 3 times and talk to neighbors as they would drive by

back in the day when we were running jobs , the basic rule of thumb for the number of cement masons to hire when working on curbs and gutters was 100’ feet per man per day......and that included setting up the forms , pouring and finishing , and stripping the forms for the next day...

but if we really hustled , a good finisher can do 2-300’ a day with a good laborer as a helper.....ask me how I know
Looks like work but I suppose if'n a person does it often it's syatematic. Just to pick your knowledgeable brain a little more, did you pour to the top of the forms and work to the side or go back and forth in layers?
 

spinalcracker

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Looks like work but I suppose if'n a person does it often it's syatematic. Just to pick your knowledgeable brain a little more, did you pour to the top of the forms and work to the side or go back and forth in layers?

poured to the top as I progressed...

I also used hot water

its all covered with moving blankets
 

newmisty

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Yesterday i started a small job for new clients in their mid 70's. They are downsizing to a new home Contrary to what is normal and a safe practice we started talking politics.

A short time later she brought the bike out that i was told was for sale the day before during our initial meeting. We were in the crawl space and the lady looked over at 2 bikes and said that they were going to be selling a lot of stuff. I said actually I'm in the market for one and said ill so a little research.

The next day, yesterday, she wheeled it out while i was prepping paint and said
"Its your Christmas gift".
:- O

20201224_174146~2.jpg
 

newmisty

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Finish drywall work on a $700,000 + home

20201224_163150~2.jpg
 

newmisty

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newmisty

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spinalcracker

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Now aint that purdy!? Whatcha use for forms? How (do you)cure in this weather?


just some 1x10’s and 1/4 inch Masonite for the radius

ill keep it covered in the evenings for a week or more depending on weather

a 3000 test psi concrete can be driven on after 28 days when the cure is about 90% done

the last 10% of a concrete cure lasts about 99 years and then the cement will begin to deteriorate

in the old days before curing compound , water and burlap sacks were the best cure method known and still is today as far as I know

but hey , I’ve been retired from the job for about 15 years now so I’m out of the loop , there may be a miracle product out there by now
 

newmisty

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just some 1x10’s and 1/4 inch Masonite for the radius

ill keep it covered in the evenings for a week or more depending on weather

a 3000 test psi concrete can be driven on after 28 days when the cure is about 90% done

the last 10% of a concrete cure lasts about 99 years and then the cement will begin to deteriorate

in the old days before curing compound , water and burlap sacks were the best cure method known and still is today as far as I know

but hey , I’ve been retired from the job for about 15 years now so I’m out of the loop , there may be a miracle product out there by now
What did you use to vibrate? I really want to hone my concrete skills.
I've got ideas for my own property that id like to implement. I'm starting to get a pretty good feel for it but missing some nuances and experience.
Finally got a good mixing system going. If not using wheelbarrow or mixing tray and a ho, a 5 gallon bucket, heavy duty drill and mixing thingmajiggy...Like this he-ah:

1306_Page_38_Image_0002_500.jpg
 

spinalcracker

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my vibrator on a small curb like that is my hammer....tap tap tap , both sides , top to bottom

ive poured 20’ tall walls with vibrators 30’ long

the town here just finished a $37 million dollar school....

I watched the concrete workers.....i wouldn’t let any of the workers pour and finish a 3’x3’ trash can pad.....I can’t put into words the shoddy work they did , it is not even worth it to use the word skilled laborer in the same sentence when trying to describe the lack of craftsmanship these idiots produced....rip off big time
 

newmisty

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my vibrator on a small curb like that is my hammer....tap tap tap , both sides , top to bottom

ive poured 20’ tall walls with vibrators 30’ long

the town here just finished a $37 million dollar school....

I watched the concrete workers.....i wouldn’t let any of the workers pour and finish a 3’x3’ trash can pad.....I can’t put into words the shoddy work they did , it is not even worth it to use the word skilled laborer in the same sentence when trying to describe the lack of craftsmanship these idiots produced....rip off big time
That sounds like my everyday regarding a lot of the work I see. No Pride anymore.

One thing I've been debating about in my mind is how to convert my grassy area to a more permanent driveway. So far I ended up throwing a bunch of wood chips and stuff which is made it more driveway like and I've been contemplating different ideas with concrete similar to these below
modern-cool-concrete-driveway-design-ideas.jpg
impressive-concrete-driveway-ideas.jpg

1a43b50beb7beac00e63b454923eb08a.jpg

9d96db8adbde3011a6d04b141a2be6ce.jpg



However I inadvertently sparked some ideas when I had leftover sheets of HardieBacker. After throwing it on the ground and waiting a while it became a pretty close facsimile if poured concrete( not driven on). Has me thinking of doing something similar as in the last picture above where is hardibacker on some pressure-treated material laying on a bed of gravel or something.
 

Uglytruth

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Keep the driveway ideas going. I've been going to do "something" for the last few years....... not found anything affordable that I like.
 

davycoppitt

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Of course a whole building goes down on Christmas.

Large engineering building who also leases to other tenants. They designed the HVAC system. Two 60 ton rooftop units (no gas heat) that send 55 degree air to hot water reheats. Building also has baseboard. I perfectly remember the engineer who designed it at the time was so cocky about his system and building he didn't put gas to his rooftops or glycol in the system. Rooftop units are actually more expensive as a cooling only unit, since they are not stock. Two days and you could have gased the rooftops, so we are talking $5000 to have a backup.

Well the system is awesome until the economizer sticks open in -5 degree weather. Note also they did not put a $200 dollar freeze stat on the rooftops. So the hot water reheats freeze solid and crack.


Well I get there and water is pouring everywhere, ceiling tiles, and lights falling. Main pumps still running without any water so they blew the seals. After 10 hours of double time and me working my magic the building is cruising along at 65 degrees. Will be back Monday with a few other guys to see the real damage. The owner of my company even came out to give me a hand bleeding the system and checking for leaks.

Cant wait to see the engineers on Monday pointing the finger at everyone, but themselves.

Off to bed, was also out all night in the blizzard, on Wed. Two more days and my on call is over.

IMG_0452 (1).jpg
 
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