• "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

Yosemite hangs in balance as national parks juggle growth and preservation

Scorpio

Скорпион
Founding Member
Board Elder
Site Mgr
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 25, 2010
Messages
28,470
Likes
36,718
#1
Yosemite hangs in balance as national parks juggle growth and preservation



Gabrielle Canon, USA TODAY

7 hrs ago




Each summer, cars fill the roads that snake through Yosemite, clogging some of the nation’s most iconic scenery with a churning gridlock. There were days this season when more than 8,000 vehicles passed through the gates, and the park’s website warns that visitors may spend hours waiting in traffic only to reach a full parking lot. More than 4 million people visit the park annually and this year is on track to have even more tourists than last.

© hotshotsworldwide/Getty Images breathtaking view of Yosemite national park at sunrise, California
“I hate the comparison but it’s almost like a shopping mall,” said Scott Gediman, the park’s Public Affairs officer. “The parking lot gets full and people start circling looking for a space. People get frustrated and it becomes a dangerous situation if we can’t get shuttle buses through or ambulances through,” he added. “It affects visitor experience but also poses an operational challenge.”

The issue isn’t unique to Yosemite.
The nation’s 418 national parks collectively host more than 318 million visitors each year. As a whole, the system is grappling with close to a $12 billion backlog in deferred maintenance of crumbling infrastructure, growing complaints over long wait times, and increases in both accidents and effects on animals and ecosystems.
Still, there's pressure from the top to expand access and develop new amenities that will attract even more visitors.
Under a directive from the Department of Interior issued last year, the National Park Service has made visitor experience a top priority and is increasing recreational opportunities for tourists in the hopes they will become future advocates and stewards of the land. The park service has partnered with concessionaires and gateway communities to feed this need.
“In order for us to foster an appreciation for parks, people need to come here and visit,” Gediman explained. “I am a firm believer — all of us at the NPS are — that you can certainly watch videos about the park or look at photos but there is no substitution for being here. Hiking on the trails, smelling the smells — just getting the feeling.”
To facilitate those experiences, new amenities are being offered at Yosemite — including luxury lodging, upscale restaurants and controversial telecom towers built to saturate the wilderness in cell coverage — meant to entice a new generation of tourists interested in image and attached to their electronics.
But some say the "improvements" are exacting a steep toll on the nature of the parks.
Conservationists and park purists increasingly are voicing concerns about corporate-influence creeping into the parks, raising questions about whether profit has been prioritized over preservation. As more people are packed in, overcrowding not only threatens ecosystems — it also ruins the visitor experiences needed to secure these spaces.
“I do believe there is a straight-line connection between someone being able to go to a place and have an experience and to care for that place,” said Neal Desai, senior director of field operations for the National Park Conservation Association.

A balancing act but a boon for the budget

Gediman has spent most of his 55 years at Yosemite and has witnessed many changes.
First spending summers there as a kid with his family, he joined the Park Service 29 years ago and has worked to share his love of the park with visitors from around the world ever since. Part of that has been overseeing developments intended accommodate a surging number of tourists.
“We are trying to maximize the space we have, with the idea that we can’t just build endlessly.” He said. “We are trying to be smart about it and think of the dual mission —which really defines everything we are trying to do.”
The Organic Act established the National Park Service in 1916 and tasked it with a directive to both protect the “scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wildlife therein and to provide for the enjoyment” of the lands for current and future generations. In recent years, the conflicting charge has been interpreted to include access, one of the most essential components, and the parks service has tried to continue growing demand while accommodating the increased interest.
At Yosemite, Gediman says they have focused on streamlining the infrastructure. Plans are underway to expand parking and build a new welcome center, new eateries are opening and campsites are being stretched, including at iconic Camp 4 — a cherished spot for climbers.
Many of the changes have been the result of a new concessions contract with Aramark, a $9 billion company that’s three years into a 15-year contract. With plans to invest more than $100 million in upgrades, they have started to remodel and rebrand restaurants in the 128-year-old park like the newly anointed “Basecamp Eatery” that opened last year in Yosemite Valley. Complete with an expanded dining room that seats roughly 300 people and shiny electronic ordering kiosks to reduce lines, it also houses the park system’s first-ever Starbucks location, which opened amidst public outcry and protest.
Since then, things have quieted down, and now Gediman says most visitors are happy to start their mornings at the prolific coffee retailer. He added that the redesign was intended to improve facilities, but also to speed more people through.
“That’s one of the things with the Starbucks,” he said. “It was certainly controversial, but one of the nice things is people can get their coffee and get a muffin and get on the trail.”

From camping to glamping

It’s more than enhancing the infrastructure, though. New amenities are being built both inside and outside the park to increase options for guests looking for luxury.
Advertised as a “destination within a destination,” Rush Creek Lodge opened in 2016 with 143 “tastefully appointed lodge rooms, suites, and hillside villas.” It is owned and operated by Delaware North, Yosemite’s previous concessionaire, which has invested $70 million into the region over the past decade. This year, the company spent $25 million to add another new “upscale cabin development,” and the so-called “Explorer Cabins” opened this summer.
AutoCamp, a San Francisco company that offers lavish accommodations in Airstream trailers, opened its first national park location at Yosemite this year. With carefully designed interiors, complete with “spa inspired bathrooms,” guests can also stay in AutoCamp’s Luxury Tents or cabins. Both come with access to the mid-century modern clubhouse.
Whether or not there was an intentional shift to cater to a new type of clientele, tourists who are flooding into parks are bringing their wallets with them. Across the system, spending has risen roughly 40% since 2013, coming in at more than $20 billion last year, according to a report done by the park service. Lodging accounted for the biggest chunk, with close to $7 billion spent, followed by food, that came in at $4 billion.
Gediman attributes the increase to a shift in how tourists spend time in the park, mostly because there’s just not enough space for everyone.
“Back in the day, 80% of the visitors would come to the park and stay in the park, and 20% would just come for the day,” he said. “Now, that has flipped. There is not enough hotel and campsites to meet the demand and most of the folks are staying outside the park.” Those coming for the day need more services than those who will be spending their nights around a campfire in the woods.
It’s had a big impact on gateway communities.
Yosemite visitors boosted the local economy by more than $624 million in 2018 and both local and national economic interests have been a way officials have signified that the parks offer an important return on investment.
“We are proud to work with our gateway communities to help park visitors discover deep and lasting connections to Yosemite and the surrounding area,” said Yosemite Superintendent Michael Reynolds in a statement. “National park tourism is a significant driver in the national economy, returning $10 for every $1 invested in the National Park Service, and it’s a big factor in our local economy as well.”
That’s one reason why the NPS may be trying hard to remain relevant for younger crowds. The parks service is obliging their needs with internet access, high-end consumer options and—of course—the best instagrammable backdrops. Cell service has expanded alongside upgrades in concessions.
"The ways people find out about—and visit—parks is changing," National Park Service Deputy Director Lena McDowall told the Senate Subcommittee on National Parks in 2017, commenting on how to meet the needs of millennials. “Visitors want to be able to use their mobile devices to share photos and experiences with their friends and family—and they want to take advantage of the many Internet-based resources we have developed.”

Wi-Fi in the wilderness

Not everyone is pleased by increases in tech access in the parks.
Jeff Ruch, who helped found environmental advocacy organization Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, classifies it as a loss for what he calls serenity values. His group has closely tracked the developments and pushes on the federal government to shine more light on what he views as a secretive process to hand public lands over to telecom companies.
PEER also has challenged the agency on how it managed the plan to expand cell service. An audit, called for by the organization and released by the Interior Department Office of Inspector General at the end of July, found the NPS has mismanaged its accounting of how many cell towers are being built and managed, along with the permits required costs recovered, and revenues from leasing the land for the towers to cell companies.
The auditors found that the National Environmental Policy Act, which requires research on the impact to the environment, may have not been performed consistently and that at Yosemite, close to $500,000 in land-use fees went uncollected.
There are also concerns about how visitors experiences will change with better connectivity.
If last year's super bloom fiasco — where hordes of selfie-stick-wielding instagrammers flooded and trampled fields of delicate flowers — is any indication, cell phones can sometimes foster bad behavior. More than that, Ruch says the stewardship the parks hope to impart will be lost behind a screen.
“National parks are surrendering without a fight, the idea that people can’t be disconnected,” he said. “Even if you don’t bring your own device if somebody next to you is ordering stocks or listening to music or hunting Pokémon—it’s hard to commune with nature when you are still electronically tethered."
Gediman says he understands both sides but he added that cellphones can be used in positive ways in the parks.
There’s a new app, for example, created with help from the Yosemite Conservancy and launched this summer, which helps visitors learn about and interact with the environment. It’s also helped Yosemite cut down on map-printing costs, typically given at entrances. Now with more cell coverage at the park, most will pass on printed maps, which Gediman sees as a win for sustainability.
“Like everything, both here and in life, it is a balancing act,” he said, giving a nod to the dual mandate. He and the officials across the system are doing what they can to provide the most memorable experiences while they work to protect the parks they love. Gediman added that concessionaires and gateway communities are partners in that mission and many companies catering to tourists have worked to ensure sustainability is a top priority.
AutoCamp, the new airstream resort for example, helps introduce inexperienced guests to “leave no trace,” principles, added a bus stop at its facility to encourage visitors not to drive into the park, and has invested in sustainable amenities, all in the hopes of having a positive impact on the park.
“We are trying to preserve and protect the park,” he said. “It is a privilege to foster the connection and provide a meaningful fun experience. All of these things are a part of that. It is just about finding that sweet spot, with both lodging and cell phones and Starbucks — all of it," he added. "How do you improve it, to meet the needs of visitors while keeping the traditions?"
This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Yosemite hangs in balance as national parks juggle growth and preservation

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/y...growth-and-preservation/ar-AAGRThX?li=BBnbcA1
 

Merlin

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
2,729
Likes
3,655
#3
2 many fookin' 2 leggahs
That's true for many Chicago suburbs as well. And the problem extends into NW Indiana All the way to Michigan City and beyond.

My world is getting crowded by 2 many fookin' 2 leggahs. Many of them are messin' with their cell phones and driving with their knees. I'd like to move to a quieter, more serene setting; but I don't know where that would be.
 
Last edited:

GOLDBRIX

God,Donald Trump,most in GIM2 I Trust. OTHERS-meh
Sr Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Apr 4, 2010
Messages
10,823
Likes
12,984
#4
Yosemite hangs in balance as national parks juggle growth and preservation



Gabrielle Canon, USA TODAY

7 hrs ago



Each summer, cars fill the roads that snake through Yosemite, clogging some of the nation’s most iconic scenery with a churning gridlock. There were days this season when more than 8,000 vehicles passed through the gates, and the park’s website warns that visitors may spend hours waiting in traffic only to reach a full parking lot. More than 4 million people visit the park annually and this year is on track to have even more tourists than last.

© hotshotsworldwide/Getty Images breathtaking view of Yosemite national park at sunrise, California
“I hate the comparison but it’s almost like a shopping mall,” said Scott Gediman, the park’s Public Affairs officer. “The parking lot gets full and people start circling looking for a space. People get frustrated and it becomes a dangerous situation if we can’t get shuttle buses through or ambulances through,” he added. “It affects visitor experience but also poses an operational challenge.”

The issue isn’t unique to Yosemite.
The nation’s 418 national parks collectively host more than 318 million visitors each year. As a whole, the system is grappling with close to a $12 billion backlog in deferred maintenance of crumbling infrastructure, growing complaints over long wait times, and increases in both accidents and effects on animals and ecosystems.
Still, there's pressure from the top to expand access and develop new amenities that will attract even more visitors.
Under a directive from the Department of Interior issued last year, the National Park Service has made visitor experience a top priority and is increasing recreational opportunities for tourists in the hopes they will become future advocates and stewards of the land. The park service has partnered with concessionaires and gateway communities to feed this need.
“In order for us to foster an appreciation for parks, people need to come here and visit,” Gediman explained. “I am a firm believer — all of us at the NPS are — that you can certainly watch videos about the park or look at photos but there is no substitution for being here. Hiking on the trails, smelling the smells — just getting the feeling.”
To facilitate those experiences, new amenities are being offered at Yosemite — including luxury lodging, upscale restaurants and controversial telecom towers built to saturate the wilderness in cell coverage — meant to entice a new generation of tourists interested in image and attached to their electronics.
But some say the "improvements" are exacting a steep toll on the nature of the parks.
Conservationists and park purists increasingly are voicing concerns about corporate-influence creeping into the parks, raising questions about whether profit has been prioritized over preservation. As more people are packed in, overcrowding not only threatens ecosystems — it also ruins the visitor experiences needed to secure these spaces.
“I do believe there is a straight-line connection between someone being able to go to a place and have an experience and to care for that place,” said Neal Desai, senior director of field operations for the National Park Conservation Association.

A balancing act but a boon for the budget

Gediman has spent most of his 55 years at Yosemite and has witnessed many changes.
First spending summers there as a kid with his family, he joined the Park Service 29 years ago and has worked to share his love of the park with visitors from around the world ever since. Part of that has been overseeing developments intended accommodate a surging number of tourists.
“We are trying to maximize the space we have, with the idea that we can’t just build endlessly.” He said. “We are trying to be smart about it and think of the dual mission —which really defines everything we are trying to do.”
The Organic Act established the National Park Service in 1916 and tasked it with a directive to both protect the “scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wildlife therein and to provide for the enjoyment” of the lands for current and future generations. In recent years, the conflicting charge has been interpreted to include access, one of the most essential components, and the parks service has tried to continue growing demand while accommodating the increased interest.
At Yosemite, Gediman says they have focused on streamlining the infrastructure. Plans are underway to expand parking and build a new welcome center, new eateries are opening and campsites are being stretched, including at iconic Camp 4 — a cherished spot for climbers.
Many of the changes have been the result of a new concessions contract with Aramark, a $9 billion company that’s three years into a 15-year contract. With plans to invest more than $100 million in upgrades, they have started to remodel and rebrand restaurants in the 128-year-old park like the newly anointed “Basecamp Eatery” that opened last year in Yosemite Valley. Complete with an expanded dining room that seats roughly 300 people and shiny electronic ordering kiosks to reduce lines, it also houses the park system’s first-ever Starbucks location, which opened amidst public outcry and protest.
Since then, things have quieted down, and now Gediman says most visitors are happy to start their mornings at the prolific coffee retailer. He added that the redesign was intended to improve facilities, but also to speed more people through.
“That’s one of the things with the Starbucks,” he said. “It was certainly controversial, but one of the nice things is people can get their coffee and get a muffin and get on the trail.”

From camping to glamping

It’s more than enhancing the infrastructure, though. New amenities are being built both inside and outside the park to increase options for guests looking for luxury.
Advertised as a “destination within a destination,” Rush Creek Lodge opened in 2016 with 143 “tastefully appointed lodge rooms, suites, and hillside villas.” It is owned and operated by Delaware North, Yosemite’s previous concessionaire, which has invested $70 million into the region over the past decade. This year, the company spent $25 million to add another new “upscale cabin development,” and the so-called “Explorer Cabins” opened this summer.
AutoCamp, a San Francisco company that offers lavish accommodations in Airstream trailers, opened its first national park location at Yosemite this year. With carefully designed interiors, complete with “spa inspired bathrooms,” guests can also stay in AutoCamp’s Luxury Tents or cabins. Both come with access to the mid-century modern clubhouse.
Whether or not there was an intentional shift to cater to a new type of clientele, tourists who are flooding into parks are bringing their wallets with them. Across the system, spending has risen roughly 40% since 2013, coming in at more than $20 billion last year, according to a report done by the park service. Lodging accounted for the biggest chunk, with close to $7 billion spent, followed by food, that came in at $4 billion.
Gediman attributes the increase to a shift in how tourists spend time in the park, mostly because there’s just not enough space for everyone.
“Back in the day, 80% of the visitors would come to the park and stay in the park, and 20% would just come for the day,” he said. “Now, that has flipped. There is not enough hotel and campsites to meet the demand and most of the folks are staying outside the park.” Those coming for the day need more services than those who will be spending their nights around a campfire in the woods.
It’s had a big impact on gateway communities.
Yosemite visitors boosted the local economy by more than $624 million in 2018 and both local and national economic interests have been a way officials have signified that the parks offer an important return on investment.
“We are proud to work with our gateway communities to help park visitors discover deep and lasting connections to Yosemite and the surrounding area,” said Yosemite Superintendent Michael Reynolds in a statement. “National park tourism is a significant driver in the national economy, returning $10 for every $1 invested in the National Park Service, and it’s a big factor in our local economy as well.”
That’s one reason why the NPS may be trying hard to remain relevant for younger crowds. The parks service is obliging their needs with internet access, high-end consumer options and—of course—the best instagrammable backdrops. Cell service has expanded alongside upgrades in concessions.
"The ways people find out about—and visit—parks is changing," National Park Service Deputy Director Lena McDowall told the Senate Subcommittee on National Parks in 2017, commenting on how to meet the needs of millennials. “Visitors want to be able to use their mobile devices to share photos and experiences with their friends and family—and they want to take advantage of the many Internet-based resources we have developed.”

Wi-Fi in the wilderness

Not everyone is pleased by increases in tech access in the parks.
Jeff Ruch, who helped found environmental advocacy organization Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, classifies it as a loss for what he calls serenity values. His group has closely tracked the developments and pushes on the federal government to shine more light on what he views as a secretive process to hand public lands over to telecom companies.
PEER also has challenged the agency on how it managed the plan to expand cell service. An audit, called for by the organization and released by the Interior Department Office of Inspector General at the end of July, found the NPS has mismanaged its accounting of how many cell towers are being built and managed, along with the permits required costs recovered, and revenues from leasing the land for the towers to cell companies.
The auditors found that the National Environmental Policy Act, which requires research on the impact to the environment, may have not been performed consistently and that at Yosemite, close to $500,000 in land-use fees went uncollected.
There are also concerns about how visitors experiences will change with better connectivity.
If last year's super bloom fiasco — where hordes of selfie-stick-wielding instagrammers flooded and trampled fields of delicate flowers — is any indication, cell phones can sometimes foster bad behavior. More than that, Ruch says the stewardship the parks hope to impart will be lost behind a screen.
“National parks are surrendering without a fight, the idea that people can’t be disconnected,” he said. “Even if you don’t bring your own device if somebody next to you is ordering stocks or listening to music or hunting Pokémon—it’s hard to commune with nature when you are still electronically tethered."
Gediman says he understands both sides but he added that cellphones can be used in positive ways in the parks.
There’s a new app, for example, created with help from the Yosemite Conservancy and launched this summer, which helps visitors learn about and interact with the environment. It’s also helped Yosemite cut down on map-printing costs, typically given at entrances. Now with more cell coverage at the park, most will pass on printed maps, which Gediman sees as a win for sustainability.
“Like everything, both here and in life, it is a balancing act,” he said, giving a nod to the dual mandate. He and the officials across the system are doing what they can to provide the most memorable experiences while they work to protect the parks they love. Gediman added that concessionaires and gateway communities are partners in that mission and many companies catering to tourists have worked to ensure sustainability is a top priority.
AutoCamp, the new airstream resort for example, helps introduce inexperienced guests to “leave no trace,” principles, added a bus stop at its facility to encourage visitors not to drive into the park, and has invested in sustainable amenities, all in the hopes of having a positive impact on the park.
“We are trying to preserve and protect the park,” he said. “It is a privilege to foster the connection and provide a meaningful fun experience. All of these things are a part of that. It is just about finding that sweet spot, with both lodging and cell phones and Starbucks — all of it," he added. "How do you improve it, to meet the needs of visitors while keeping the traditions?"
This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Yosemite hangs in balance as national parks juggle growth and preservation

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/y...growth-and-preservation/ar-AAGRThX?li=BBnbcA1
To the rich and big business parks are just raw land that needs to be developed, $$$$$$$ Nothing more than $$$$$$$$ to be made.
 

DodgebyDave

Metal Messiah
Midas Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
11,267
Likes
12,501
#5
I support the arming of bears. shooting them in the leg works too.

 

Aurumag

Ag mirror of truth Aurum purity of mind
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
9,522
Likes
11,628
Location
State of Jefferson
#6
I prefer to visit Yosemite in the off-season when the park is almost tranquil.

I can stay within 10 miles of home if I want gridlock.
 

DodgebyDave

Metal Messiah
Midas Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
11,267
Likes
12,501
#8
these areas should be left wild. as wild as can be. Let idiots become bear shit.

set up cams and have paramutual betting. Help pay for wolf, bear and especially bison breeding programs.


I'm surprised that at least one of the two coward ass adults didn't push her down to get away.

Regardless I give the bison 8 for the hangtime, 9.5 for form and the little girl a 9.5 for rotation and and a 10 for sticking the landing.
 

DodgebyDave

Metal Messiah
Midas Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
11,267
Likes
12,501
#9
this should be a ride you can pay for

 

GOLDBRIX

God,Donald Trump,most in GIM2 I Trust. OTHERS-meh
Sr Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Apr 4, 2010
Messages
10,823
Likes
12,984
#10
The parents of that girl ought to have been cited with a fine for disturbing wildlife. Who in the hell thinks being in the wide open with an 1-1.5K lbs animal free roaming thought that was a good idea ?
FINE their ass and they need to be glad they only have a hospital bill to pay and not a funeral.
 

GOLDBRIX

God,Donald Trump,most in GIM2 I Trust. OTHERS-meh
Sr Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Apr 4, 2010
Messages
10,823
Likes
12,984
#11

Irons

Deep Sixed
Sr Site Supporter
Mother Lode
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
29,233
Likes
52,568
#12
It is nice and quiet in my neck of the national forest this weekend and it will stay that way until the end of May. BUT there were more tourists around this summer than ever before. It's that damn Trump making America great again. Fookin' 2 leggahs have $$$ for trucks and toys and here they come to rent all the cottages, cabins and campsites. They are a different crowd than years ago but there is a lot of them again.

.
 

GOLDBRIX

God,Donald Trump,most in GIM2 I Trust. OTHERS-meh
Sr Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Apr 4, 2010
Messages
10,823
Likes
12,984
#13
Fookin' 2 leggahs have $$$ for trucks and toys and here they come to rent all the cottages, cabins and campsites.
Doesn't that mean more booty to be found by those careless bobble wearers ?
 

Scorpio

Скорпион
Founding Member
Board Elder
Site Mgr
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 25, 2010
Messages
28,470
Likes
36,718
#16
turn off the wifi and cell towers
never happen, all these little towns drool over city folk dough,
each fighting to get their piece of it,

fighting hard for crumbs, willing to sell out a neighbor to get their 'share'
 

Pyramid

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
1,860
Likes
2,415
Location
The 57th State
#17
National Parks were largely created by the Antiquities act by Teddy Roosevelt and expanded by the creation of the NPS by Woody Wilson around the turn of the 20th century to expose Americans to the wild and scenic areas of our fledgling nation. Access to them by car was fine then, as the population was much smaller and transportation networks far less efficient than now.

A century later, the NPS infrastructure is largely the same with far more people visiting.

I say leave the infrastructure as is. Let the foreign tourists, weekend and Winnebago warriors fight for parking spots and deal with the construction and traffic jams when they are merely driving from one attraction to another. I've been to many of them and the overcrowded tourist traps are appalling. With that being said, if you get 1/4 mile away from the parking lots on the trails or waters, you'll largely have the place to yourself without the lazy, selfie-taking tourists that dont get more than 500' from their car. The wilderness is still there, just have to work a bit more to experience it.
 

ttazzman

Midas Member
Midas Member
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
5,497
Likes
5,668
Location
mid-usa
#18
I prefer to visit Yosemite in the off-season when the park is almost tranquil.

I can stay within 10 miles of home if I want gridlock.
yosemite and redwoods is on my list for next year......can you advise best times of year to visit? ie offseason but accessable etc Thx..... I did Yellowstone a couple of years ago the first week it was open and it was a very pleasant experience....just got back from Rainer/Hood area
 

EO 11110

CENSORSHIP KILLS
Site Supporter
Mother Lode
Joined
Jul 31, 2010
Messages
14,598
Likes
11,380
Location
clown world
#19
i struggle with the claims of the parks seeing rising interest. is it the retiring boomers?

because the generations below them are fully domesticated electronic slave-drones. they don't hunt. they don't fish. hell, they don't even leave the house to frequent retailers. a more pussified indoor population cannot be found in our history

not unlikely these rising demand stories are propaganda, fishing for shekels and/or enviro restrictions
 

tigerwillow1

Silver Member
Silver Miner
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
822
Likes
1,302
#20
About 5 years ago I drove into Yosemite in September on a weekday after school had started. After driving the valley loop a couple of times with no place to park the car anywhere, I blew it off and left. 2 years ago in late September the Mt. Rainier campground (admittedly on a Friday night) was full and I ended up in a forest service campground outside the park. A few years earlier there would have been plenty of space. (I know because I've been there almost every year in late September).
 

Merlin

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
2,729
Likes
3,655
#21
I would love to see some of our scenic treasures. Visiting the Grand Canyon was nearly a religious experience for me -- it is a very spiritual place. So, your telling us tigerwillow1, that Yosemite is congested in Autumn. How about early Spring?
 

PhucilliJerry

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Feb 3, 2011
Messages
1,084
Likes
902
#23
i struggle with the claims of the parks seeing rising interest. is it the retiring boomers?

because the generations below them are fully domesticated electronic slave-drones. they don't hunt. they don't fish. hell, they don't even leave the house to frequent retailers. a more pussified indoor population cannot be found in our history

not unlikely these rising demand stories are propaganda, fishing for shekels and/or enviro restrictions
I can’t speak for other parks/forests but the White Mountain National Forest in NH has seen a boom in visitors over the past decade or so and much of it is from the younger generations. Many coming from MA, CT and NY. The popularity of one particular hike (Franconia Ridge) resulted in nearly mile long rows of parked cars along interstate 93 on weekends and holidays. Now they’ve closed parking on 93 and have shuttle busses from Cannon Mountain to the trailheads.
 

tigerwillow1

Silver Member
Silver Miner
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
822
Likes
1,302
#24
So, your telling us tigerwillow1, that Yosemite is congested in Autumn. How about early Spring?
Somebody else will have to answer that. I just happened to be passing by this one time. When I was previously at Yosemite a few times in the late 70s, there wasn't anything close to the crowds I saw a few years ago.